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American Indian--Alaska Native youth health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3576
Source
JAMA. 1992 Mar 25;267(12):1637-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-25-1992
Author
R W Blum
B. Harmon
L. Harris
L. Bergeisen
M D Resnick
Author Affiliation
Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, University of Minnesota, Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis 55455.
Source
JAMA. 1992 Mar 25;267(12):1637-44
Date
Mar-25-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology
Child Abuse - ethnology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk-Taking
Self Concept
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Smoking - ethnology
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Suicide, Attempted - ethnology
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To assess risk behaviors, health problems, worries and concerns, and resiliency-promoting factors among American Indian-Alaska Native adolescents. DESIGN--Survey. SETTING--Nonurban schools from eight Indian Health Service areas. PARTICIPANTS--A total of 13,454 seventh- through 12th-grade American Indian-Alaska Native youths. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--revised version of the Adolescent Health Survey, a comprehensive, anonymous, self-report questionnaire with 162 items addressing 10 dimensions of health. RESULTS--Poor physical health was reported by 2% of the study sample and was significantly correlated with social risk factors of physical and/or sexual abuse, suicide attempts, substance abuse, poor school performance, and nutritional inadequacies. Injury risk behaviors included never wearing seatbelts (44%), drinking and driving (37.9% of driving 10th through 12th graders), and riding with a driver who had been drinking (21.8%). Physical and sexual abuse prevalence was 10% and 13%, respectively, with 23.9% of females reporting physical abuse and 21.6% of females reporting sexual abuse by the 12th grade. Almost 6% of the entire sample endorsed signs of severe emotional distress. Eleven percent of the teens surveyed knew someone who had killed himself or herself, and 17% had attempted suicide themselves. Sixty-five percent of males and 56.8% of females reported having had intercourse by the 12th grade. Weekly or more frequent alcohol use rose from 8.2% of seventh graders to 14.1% by the 12th grade; for males, the survey noted an increase in regular alcohol use of 3% to 5% a year to 27.3% by the 12th grade. For each variable measured, rates are much higher for American Indian adolescents than those for rural white Minnesota youth, except for age at first intercourse and alcohol use. CONCLUSIONS--American Indian-Alaska Native adolescents reported high rates of health-compromising behaviors and risk factors related to unintentional injury, substance use, poor self-assessed health status, emotional distress, and suicide. Interventions must be culturally sensitive, acknowledge the heterogeneity of Indian populations, be grounded in cultural traditions that promote health, and be developed with full participation of the involved communities.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 1992 Aug 19;268(7):8741640612
PubMed ID
1542173 View in PubMed
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Bivariate mixture modeling of transferrin saturation and serum ferritin concentration in Asians, African Americans, Hispanics, and whites in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159308
Source
Transl Res. 2008 Feb;151(2):97-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Christine E McLaren
Victor R Gordeuk
Wen-Pin Chen
James C Barton
Ronald T Acton
Mark Speechley
Oswaldo Castro
Paul C Adams
Beverly M Snively
Emily L Harris
David M Reboussin
Geoffrey J McLachlan
Richard Bean
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Irvine, California, USA. cmclaren@uci.edu
Source
Transl Res. 2008 Feb;151(2):97-109
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Continental Population Groups - genetics
Female
Ferritins - blood
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Hemochromatosis - blood - genetics
Humans
Iron Overload - blood - genetics
Male
Models, Genetic
Odds Ratio
Transferrin - metabolism
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Bivariate mixture modeling was used to analyze joint population distributions of transferrin saturation (TS) and serum ferritin concentration (SF) measured in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study. Four components (C1, C2, C3, and C4) with successively age-adjusted increasing means for TS and SF were identified in data from 26,832 African Americans, 12,620 Asians, 12,264 Hispanics, and 43,254 whites. The largest component, C2, had normal mean TS (21% to 26% for women, 29% to 30% for men) and SF (43-82 microg/L for women, 165-242 microg/L for men), which consisted of component proportions greater than 0.59 for women and greater than 0.68 for men. C3 and C4 had progressively greater mean values for TS and SF with progressively lesser component proportions. C1 had mean TS values less than 16% for women (
Notes
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PubMed ID
18201677 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Regist Nurse. 1990 Feb;2(1):26-31, 38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
L. Harris
Source
Regist Nurse. 1990 Feb;2(1):26-31, 38
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Environmental health
Environmental monitoring
Health Policy
Humans
Ontario
Public health nursing
PubMed ID
2315531 View in PubMed
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Clinical manifestations of hemochromatosis in HFE C282Y homozygotes identified by screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154147
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Nov;22(11):923-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Gordon D McLaren
Christine E McLaren
Paul C Adams
James C Barton
David M Reboussin
Victor R Gordeuk
Ronald T Acton
Emily L Harris
Mark R Speechley
Phyliss Sholinsky
Fitzroy W Dawkins
Beverly M Snively
Thomas M Vogt
John H Eckfeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Veteran's Affairs Long Beach Healthcare Systems, Long Beach, California 90822, USA. gordon.mclaren@va.gov
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Nov;22(11):923-30
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
DNA - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Testing - methods
Hemochromatosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Histocompatibility Antigens Class I - blood - genetics
Homozygote
Humans
Iron - blood
Male
Membrane Proteins - blood - genetics
Middle Aged
Mutation
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Patients with hemochromatosis may suffer organ damage from iron overload, often with serious clinical consequences.
To assess prevalences of self-reported symptoms and clinical signs and conditions in persons homozygous for the hemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutation (C282Y) identified by screening.
Participants were adults 25 years of age or older enrolled in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study. C282Y homozygotes (n=282) were compared with control participants without the HFE C282Y or H63D alleles (ie, wild type/wild type; n=364).
Previously diagnosed C282Y homozygotes and newly diagnosed homozygotes with elevated serum ferritin levels had higher prevalences of certain symptoms such as chronic fatigue (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.34 to 5.95, and OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.07 to 3.75, respectively), and had more hyperpigmentation on physical examination (OR 4.7; 95% CI 1.50 to 15.06, and OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.10 to 12.16, respectively) and swelling or tenderness of the second and third metacarpophalangeal joints (OR 4.2; 95% CI 1.37 to 13.03, and OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.17 to 9.49, respectively) than control subjects. Joint stiffness was also more common among newly diagnosed C282Y homozygotes with elevated serum ferritin than among control subjects (OR 2.7; 95% CI 1.38 to 5.30). However, the sex- and age-adjusted prevalences of self-reported symptoms and signs of liver disease, heart disease, diabetes and most other major clinical manifestations of hemochromatosis were similar in C282Y homozygotes and control subjects.
Some symptoms and conditions associated with hemochromatosis were more prevalent among C282Y homozygotes identified by screening than among control subjects, but prevalences of most outcomes were similar in C282Y homozygotes and controls in this primary care-based study.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19018338 View in PubMed
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The evolving pattern of symptomatic coronary artery disease in the United States and Canada: baseline characteristics of the Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive DruG Evaluation (COURAGE) trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165638
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2007 Jan 15;99(2):208-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2007
Author
William E Boden
Robert A O'rourke
Koon K Teo
Pamela M Hartigan
David J Maron
William Kostuk
Merril Knudtson
Marcin Dada
Paul Casperson
Crystal L Harris
John A Spertus
Leslee Shaw
Bernard R Chaitman
G B John Mancini
Daniel S Berman
Gerald Gau
William S Weintraub
Author Affiliation
VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, Connecticut, USA. wboden@kaleidahealth.org
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2007 Jan 15;99(2):208-12
Date
Jan-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - radiography - therapy
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Revascularization - methods
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Thrombolytic Therapy - methods
Time Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Major improvements in medical therapy and percutaneous coronary intervention for coronary artery disease (CAD) have emerged during the previous 2 decades, but no randomized trial in patients with stable CAD has been powered to compare these 2 strategies for the hard clinical end points of death or myocardial infarction (MI), and previous studies have not evaluated the effect of coronary stents and intensive medical therapy on cardiac events during long-term follow-up. Between 1999 and 2004, 2,287 patients with documented myocardial ischemia and angiographically confirmed CAD were randomized to the Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive DruG Evaluation (COURAGE) trial, with a principal hypothesis that a strategy of percutaneous coronary intervention plus intensive, guideline-driven medical therapy would be superior to a strategy of intensive medical therapy alone. The primary end point was a composite of all-cause mortality or acute MI (time to first event) during a 2.5- to 7-year (median 5) follow-up. Baseline characteristics were a mean age of 62 +/- 5 years, 85% men, and 86% Caucasian. Mean duration of angina before randomization was 26 months (average 10 episodes/week), and 29% of patients were smokers, 67% had hypertension, 38% had previous MI, 71% had dyslipidemia, 34% had diabetes, 27% had previous revascularization, and 69% had multivessel CAD. Approximately 55% of patients met established criteria for the metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, baseline characteristics of the COURAGE trial study population indicate a highly symptomatic group of patients with CAD who have a significant duration and frequency of antecedent angina pectoris and a high prevalence of cardiac risk factors.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Cardiol. 2007 Nov 15;100(10):160418051252
PubMed ID
17223420 View in PubMed
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Heart mass and blood pressure have separate genetic determinants in the New Zealand genetically hypertensive (GH) rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54786
Source
J Hypertens. 1995 Apr;13(4):397-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
E L Harris
E L Phelan
C M Thompson
J A Millar
M R Grigor
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
Source
J Hypertens. 1995 Apr;13(4):397-404
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Base Sequence
Blood Pressure - genetics - physiology
Cardiomegaly - genetics - physiopathology
DNA - genetics
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Genotype
Guanylate Cyclase - genetics
Hypertension - genetics - physiopathology
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Receptors, Atrial Natriuretic Factor - genetics
Renin - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Chromosomes - genetics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine associations between cardiovascular parameters and genotype in 205 F2 rats of both sexes and lineages from reciprocal crosses made between rats of the New Zealand genetically hypertensive (GH) and Brown Norway (BN) rat strains. METHODS: Systolic tail blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, pulse rate, heart mass, body mass and relative heart mass were determined for each rat in the age range 17-19 weeks, and DNA polymorphisms were examined for the guanylyl cyclase A (GCA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and renin (REN) genes. RESULTS: The phenotypic data indicated the presence of genes on the X and Y chromosomes that affected blood pressure. The GH GCA allele, in males only, and the GH ACE allele, in females only, both cosegregated with increased blood pressure. The ACE effect was confined to rats of one lineage only, namely those with GH grandfathers. A cosegregation of the GH REN allele with decreased blood pressure was also detected in females with BN grandfathers. In contrast, the GH REN allele cosegregated with a smaller heart in males only, whereas the GH ACE allele cosegregated with a larger heart both in males and in females. In males this was the consequence of a decrease in body mass with no change in absolute heart mass, whereas in females there were changes in both of these parameters. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that cardiac hypertrophy and blood pressure have independent genetic determinants in the GH rat, and indicate the importance of sex in determining the phenotypic expression of genes underlying cardiovascular pathology.
PubMed ID
7629399 View in PubMed
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Hospital management principles applicable to the veterinary teaching hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177690
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2004;31(3):273-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Donna L Harris
James W Lloyd
Mike Marrinan
Author Affiliation
College of Veterinary Medicine, A110 Veterinary Medical Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2004;31(3):273-80
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Education, Veterinary - organization & administration
Hospital Administration - methods
Hospitals, Animal
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
United States
Abstract
The Skills, Knowledge, Aptitude, and Attitude (SKA) Subcommittee of the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues (NCVEI) has identified the need for veterinary teaching hospitals (VTH) to be at the forefront of progressive business management to serve as a model for both students and practitioners to emulate. To provide a foundation for developing a model, this study reviewed pertinent literature applicable to the management of a VTH. Much of the literature relevant to VTH management relates to work completed for the human side of medicine (academic health centers, or AHCs) or to the private sector. This review explores management practices in strategic planning, financial management, human resource management, marketing, pricing, operations, and legal issues. It is concluded that strategic management is important to provide the foundation for success in the VTH. In addition, periodic financial reports are recommended, as are the development and use of benchmarks for financial management. Establishing positive, motivating human resource practices is also suggested, along with development of a marketing plan based on a clear understanding of VTH core competencies and the market's specific needs.
PubMed ID
15510343 View in PubMed
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Importance of heritable and nonheritable variation in cancer susceptibility: evidence from a twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22189
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Feb 19;89(4):270-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-1997
Author
E L Harris
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Feb 19;89(4):270-2
Date
Feb-19-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Disease Susceptibility
Diseases in Twins - etiology - genetics
Humans
Neoplasms - etiology - genetics
Research Design
Sweden
Twin Studies
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Notes
Comment On: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Feb 19;89(4):287-939048832
PubMed ID
9048826 View in PubMed
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Reoperation in adults with repair of tetralogy of fallot: indications and outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201322
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1999 Aug;118(2):245-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
E N Oechslin
D A Harrison
L. Harris
E. Downar
G D Webb
S S Siu
W G Williams
Author Affiliation
Toronto Congenital Cardiac Centre for Adults, The Toronto Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1999 Aug;118(2):245-51
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Cryosurgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - etiology - mortality - surgery
Pulmonary Valve Insufficiency - etiology - mortality - surgery
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Tachycardia - etiology - mortality - surgery
Tetralogy of Fallot - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Outflow Obstruction - etiology - mortality - surgery
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to review indications, surgical procedures, and outcomes in adults with repaired tetralogy of Fallot referred for reoperation.
Sixty consecutive adults (age >/= 18 years) who underwent reoperation between 1975 and 1997 after previous repair of tetralogy of Fallot were reviewed. Mean age at corrective repair was 13.3 +/- 9.6 years and at reoperation 33.3 +/- 9.6 years. Mean follow-up after reoperation is 5.0 +/- 4.9 years.
Long-term complications of the right ventricular outflow tract (n = 45, 75%) were the most common indications for reoperation: severe pulmonary regurgitation (n = 23, 38%) and conduit failure (n = 13, 22%) were most frequent. Less common indications were ventricular septal patch leak (n = 6) and severe tricuspid regurgitation (n = 3). A history of sustained ventricular tachycardia was present in 20 patients (33%) and supraventricular tachycardia occurred in 9 patients (15%). A bioprosthetic valve to reconstruct the right ventricular outflow tract was used in 42 patients. Additional procedures (n = 115) to correct other residual lesions were required in 46 patients (77%). There was no perioperative mortality. Actuarial 10-year survival is 92% +/- 6%. At most recent follow-up, 93% of the patients are in New York Heart Association classification I or II. Sustained ventricular tachycardia occurred in 4 patients (7%) during follow-up.
Long-term complications of the right ventricular outflow tract were the main reason for reoperation. Mid-term survival and functional improvement after reoperation are excellent.
PubMed ID
10424997 View in PubMed
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