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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1988;93(2):187-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
L. Frödin
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1988;93(2):187-8
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Sweden
Transplantation - mortality
PubMed ID
3206728 View in PubMed
Less detail

A randomized multicenter trial of cyclosporin and prednisolone versus cyclosporin, azathioprine, and prednisolone following primary living donor renal transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52816
Source
Transpl Int. 1994 May;7(3):207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
A. Lindholm
D. Albrechtsen
A. Flatmark
G. Tufveson
N H Persson
L. Frödin
C G Groth
Author Affiliation
Department of Transplantation Surgery, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Transpl Int. 1994 May;7(3):207-15
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Azathioprine - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Cyclosporine - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Graft Rejection - prevention & control
Graft Survival - drug effects
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - physiology
Male
Norway
Prednisolone - therapeutic use
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Transplantation, Homologous
Abstract
A total of 195 consecutive recipients of primary living donor renal transplants were randomized to receive either cyclosporin (CyA) and prednisolone (double therapy) or CyA, prednisolone, and azathioprine (triple therapy). There was no significant difference in patient or graft survival, incidence of acute rejection episodes, or major complications between the groups. The graft survival at 5 years was 71.5% in patients receiving double therapy and 71.6% in patients receiving triple therapy. In a Cox regression analysis, recipient age and occurrence of acute rejection were the only independently significant variables affecting graft survival, whereas treatment schedule did not. Renal function was stable throughout the observation period and did not differ between the double and triple therapy groups. A linear regression analysis showed that recipient age, donor age, gender, and occurrence of acute rejection significantly influenced the serum creatinine level. This and previous similar prospective studies in cadaveric renal transplantation indicate that there is no advantage of routinely adding azathioprine to a double drug regimen.
PubMed ID
8060471 View in PubMed
Less detail

Causes of graft loss and mortality in cyclosporine-treated cadaveric kidney graft recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235642
Source
Transplant Proc. 1987 Feb;19(1 Pt 2):1831-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1987

Is kidney transplantation in sensitized recipients justified?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52771
Source
Transpl Int. 1996;9 Suppl 1:S49-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
A. Bersztel
J. Wadström
G. Tufveson
G. Gannedahl
M. Bengtsson
C. Bergström
L. Frödin
K. Claesson
B. Wikström
J. Wahlberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Transpl Int. 1996;9 Suppl 1:S49-53
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cadaver
Female
Graft Survival
Histocompatibility testing
Humans
Immunization
Kidney Transplantation - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine if it is justified to use the scarce resources of cadaveric kidneys on HLA-sensitized patients, by reviewing the initial and long-term outcome of cadaveric renal transplantation at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. Between January 1988 and December 1994, 402 renal transplantations were performed. The patients were divided into one group of sensitized recipients (peak panel antibody reactivity > or = 25%; n = 84) and a second of non-sensitized recipients (panel reactive antibodies
PubMed ID
8959790 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer risk after renal transplantation in the Nordic countries, 1964-1986.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23350
Source
Int J Cancer. 1995 Jan 17;60(2):183-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-1995
Author
S A Birkeland
H H Storm
L U Lamm
L. Barlow
I. Blohmé
B. Forsberg
B. Eklund
O. Fjeldborg
M. Friedberg
L. Frödin
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1995 Jan 17;60(2):183-9
Date
Jan-17-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Time Factors
Abstract
The theory that cancer may arise under conditions of reduced immune capacity is supported by observations of humans with immune deficiencies such as occur following organ transplants. However, no study on humans has been done in which the reference population was the same as that in which the cancer cases arose and in which there was a sufficiently long period of follow-up. Information on 5,692 Nordic recipients of renal transplants in 1964-1982 was linked with the national cancer registries (1964-1986) and population registries. Person-years at risk were calculated from the date of first transplantation until death or the end of the study period and were multiplied by the appropriate age- and calender-specific incidence rates to obtain the expected numbers of cancers. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated after stratification by a number of recorded variables. Altogether, 32,392 person-years were accrued, and 471 cancers occurred, yielding overall SIR of 4.6 (95% CI, 4.0 to 5.2) for males and 4.5 (95% CI, 4.0 to 5.2) for females. Significant overall 2- to 5-fold excess risks in both sexes were seen for cancers of the colon, larynx, lung and bladder, and in men also for cancers of the prostate and testis. Notably high risks, 10-fold to 30-fold above expectation, were associated with cancers of the lip, skin (non-melanoma), kidney and endocrine glands, also with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and in women also with cancers of the cervix and vulva-vagina. Among a number of donor and recipient variables studied, including tissue types and compatibility (ABO, HLA, DR), age below 45 years at the time of transplantation was the most important determinant for increased risk at most sites. Kidney transplantation increases the risk of cancer in the short and in the long term, consistent with the theory that an impaired immune system allows carcinogenic factors to act. The tumor risk is small in comparison with the benefits of transplants, but patients should be followed up for signs of cancer.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2002 Mar 10;98(2):316-911857425
PubMed ID
7829213 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.