Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS) Farm Program: results from finisher pig surveillance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138988
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Nov;57 Suppl 1:71-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
A. Deckert
S. Gow
L. Rosengren
D. Léger
B. Avery
D. Daignault
L. Dutil
R. Reid-Smith
R. Irwin
Author Affiliation
Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph, Canada. anne_deckert@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Nov;57 Suppl 1:71-84
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Canada
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - drug effects - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - drug therapy - microbiology - veterinary
Feces - microbiology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests - veterinary
Population Surveillance
Salmonella - drug effects - isolation & purification
Salmonella Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Swine
Swine Diseases - drug therapy - microbiology
Abstract
In 2006, the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS) Farm Program was implemented in sentinel grower-finisher swine herds in Québec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta. Herds were visited 1-3 times annually. Faecal samples were collected from pens of close-to-market (CTM) weight (>80 kg) pigs and antimicrobial use (AMU) data were collected via questionnaires. Samples were cultured for generic Escherichia coli and Salmonella and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. This paper describes the findings of this program between 2006 and 2008. Eighty-nine, 115 and 96 herds participated in this program in 2006, 2007 and 2008 respectively. Over the 3 years, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) levels remained consistent. During this period, resistance to one or more antimicrobials was detected in 56-63% of the Salmonella spp. isolates and 84-86% of E. coli isolates. Resistance to five or more antimicrobials was detected in 13-23% of Salmonella and 12-13% of E. coli. Resistance to drugs classified as very important to human health (Category I) by the Veterinary Drug Directorate (VDD), Health Canada, was less than or equal to 1% in both organisms. AMU data were provided by 100 herds in 2007 and 95 herds in 2008. Nine herds in 2007 and five herds in 2008 reported no AMU. The most common route of antimicrobial administration (75-79% of herds) was via feed, predominantly macrolides/lincosamides (66-68% of herds). In both 2007 and 2008, the primary reasons given for macrolide/lincosamide use were disease prevention, growth promotion and treatment of enteric disease. The Category I antimicrobials, ceftiofur and virginiamycin were not used in feed or water in any herds in 2008, but virginiamycin was used in feed in two herds in 2007. Parenteral ceftiofur was used in 29 herds (29%) in 2007 and 20 herds (21%) in 2008. The reasons for ceftiofur use included treatment of lameness, respiratory disease and enteric disease.
PubMed ID
21083820 View in PubMed
Less detail

A questionnaire on the health, management, and performance of cow-calf herds in Qu├ębec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200780
Source
Can Vet J. 1999 Sep;40(9):649-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
L. Dutil
G. Fecteau
E. Bouchard
D. Dutremblay
J. Paré
Source
Can Vet J. 1999 Sep;40(9):649-56
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - statistics & numerical data
Animals
Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Breeding - statistics & numerical data
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Pneumonia - mortality - veterinary
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Abstract
Questionnaires were mailed to 520 cow-calf producers in Québec in order to compare management practices and herd performance according to herd size (small: or = 40 females) and in 4 geographic areas for the 1995 calving season. Owners of large herds adopted management practice and preventive measures more often than did owners of small herds. Average calving and weaning rates were 95% and 87% respectively. Average perinatal and preweaning mortality rates were between 4.9% and 5.6%. A greater percentage of owners with large herds than owners of small herds reported diarrhea and pneumonia problems. Among large herds, the number of herds experiencing pneumonia and calf mortality associated with diarrhea tended to be higher in areas of the northwest. Calf mortality due to pneumonia was higher in the northeast. No regional variation was found among small herds. Further research is needed to identify diseases risk factors.
Notes
Cites: Can J Comp Med. 1985 Jan;49(1):27-333986678
Cites: Can J Comp Med. 1985 Jan;49(1):1-92985213
Cites: CMAJ. 1987 Mar 15;136(6):583-53815228
PubMed ID
10495908 View in PubMed
Less detail