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An international psychometric testing of the care dependency scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198946
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Apr;31(4):944-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
A. Dijkstra
L. Brown
B. Havens
T I Romeren
R. Zanotti
T. Dassen
W. van den Heuvel
Author Affiliation
Northern Centre For Healthcare Research, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. ate.dijkstra@med.rug.nl
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Apr;31(4):944-52
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dementia - diagnosis
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Humans
International Cooperation
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Norway
Nursing Homes
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - methods
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In an international study, psychometric properties of the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) were examined by analysing data gathered in Dutch, Canadian, Italian and Norwegian nursing homes. For that purpose, from these countries a convenience sample was developed consisting of 525 patients with dementia. The English, Italian and Norwegian research instruments were translations of the original Dutch CDS. Psychometric evaluations of the CDS were carried out for each country separately as well as for the four countries combined. High alpha coefficients between 0.94 and 0.97 were calculated. Subsequent test-retest and inter-rater reliability revealed moderate to substantial Kappa values. Factor analysis resulted in a one-factor solution. The scalability of the CDS was demonstrated by means of Mokken scale analysis. One of the main outcomes of the cross-cultural comparison was that the findings in the four countries show more similarities than differences, so that the scale can be used appropriately in nursing home practice.
PubMed ID
10759991 View in PubMed
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Attitudes toward HPV testing: interview findings from a random sample of women in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161038
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2007 Oct;28(9):782-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
L. Brown
P. Ritvo
R. Howlett
M. Cotterchio
A. Matthew
B. Rosen
J. Murphy
V. Mai
Author Affiliation
Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2007 Oct;28(9):782-98
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Female
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Ontario
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology
Vaginal Smears - statistics & numerical data
Women's health
Abstract
As most women diagnosed with cervical carcinoma have been "inadequately screened," improvements in screening are critical. After abnormal Pap test findings (through liquid-based cytology), residual specimens now can be tested simultaneously for oncogenic types of Human Papilloma virus (HPV). If these "reflex" HPV tests are negative, Pap tests need not be repeated for 12 months. Women with positive oncogenic HPV tests, however, can be referred immediately for colposcopy. There has been concern that "stigma" issues could be associated with positive HPV status (because of its sexual transmission) that might cause women to avoid this reflex HPV testing. We addressed this concern by assessing whether stigma issues surface in relation to HPV testing. We randomly selected 20 women and administered to them semistructured telephone interviews that included responses to a scenario of reflex HPV-DNA testing. Interview transcripts were analyzed qualitatively. Highly limited knowledge levels were found about HPV, but, following education about screening options, there was no rejection of HPV testing. In conclusion, it appears that women favor reflex HPV testing due to its "convenience" and perceptions that it is "the least intrusive option more definitive than Pap testing."
PubMed ID
17907007 View in PubMed
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The Canadian elder standard - pricing the cost of basic needs for the Canadian elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145075
Source
Can J Aging. 2010 Mar;29(1):39-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Bonnie-Jeanne MacDonald
Doug Andrews
Robert L Brown
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. BonnieJeanne_MacDonald@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Aging. 2010 Mar;29(1):39-56
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Income Tax
Male
Needs Assessment - economics
Poverty - classification
Retirement
Social Security - economics
Social Welfare
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
We determined the after-tax income required to finance basic needs for Canadian elders living with different circumstances in terms of age, gender, city of residence, household size, homeowner or renter status, means of transportation, and health status. Using 2001 as our base year, we priced the typical expenses for food, shelter, medical, transportation, miscellaneous basic living items and home-based long-term care for elders living in five Canadian cities. This is the first Canadian study of basic living expenses tailored to elders instead of adults in general, prepared on an absolute rather than a relative basis. We also accounted for an individual's unique life circumstances and established the varying effect that they have on the cost of basic expenses, particularly for home care. We found that the maximum Guaranteed Income Supplement and Old Age Security benefit did not meet the cost of basic needs for an elder living in poor circumstances.
PubMed ID
20202264 View in PubMed
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The Canadian National Retirement Risk Index: employing statistics Canada's LifePaths to measure the financial security of future Canadian seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133004
Source
Can Public Policy. 2011;37(Suppl):S73-S94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Bonnie-Jeanne MacDonald
Kevin D Moore
He Chen
Robert L Brown
Source
Can Public Policy. 2011;37(Suppl):S73-S94
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - ethnology
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Government - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Middle Aged
Pensions - history
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Public Policy - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Research - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Residence Characteristics - history
Retirement - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors - history
Abstract
This article measures a Canadian National Retirement Risk Index (NRRI). Originally developed by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, the NRRI is a forward-looking measure that evaluates the proportion of working-aged individuals who are at risk of not maintaining their standard of living in retirement. The Canadian retirement income system has been very effective in reducing elderly poverty, but our results suggest that it has been much less successful in maintaining the living standards of Canadians after retirement. Since the earlier years of the new millennium, we find that approximately one-third of retiring Canadians have been unable to maintain their working-age consumption after retirement—a trend that is projected to worsen significantly for future Canadian retirees. The release of the Canadian NRRI is timely given the widespread concern that the current Canadian retirement income system is inadequate. Many proposals have recently emerged to extend and/or enhance Canadian public pensions, and the NRRI is a tool to test their merit. The methodology underlying the Canadian NRRI is uniquely sophisticated and comprehensive on account of our employment of Statistics Canada’s LifePaths, a state-of-the-art stochastic microsimulation model of the Canadian population. For instance, the Canadian NRRI is novel in that it models all of the relevant sources of consumption before and after retirement, while accounting for important features that are typically neglected in retirement adequacy studies such as family size, the variation of consumption over a person’s lifetime, and the heterogeneity among the life courses of individuals.
PubMed ID
21751486 View in PubMed
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Cholesterol and Recurrent Events: a secondary prevention trial for normolipidemic patients. CARE Investigators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214291
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1995 Sep 28;76(9):98C-106C
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-1995
Author
M A Pfeffer
F M Sacks
L A Moyé
L. Brown
J L Rouleau
L H Hartley
J. Rouleau
R. Grimm
F. Sestier
W. Wickemeyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1995 Sep 28;76(9):98C-106C
Date
Sep-28-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - drug therapy - prevention & control
Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
United States
Abstract
Although elevated plasma cholesterol levels represent a well-established and significant risk for developing atherosclerosis, there is a wide spectrum of cholesterol levels in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Most secondary prevention studies have generated convincing evidence that cholesterol reduction in patients with high cholesterol levels is associated with improved clinical outcome by reducing risk of further cardiovascular events. However, other risk factors may play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of coronary disease in the majority of patients with near-normal cholesterol values. The Cholesterol and Recurrent Events (CARE) study was designed to address whether the pharmacologic reduction of cholesterol levels with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, pravastatin, would reduce the sum of fatal coronary artery disease (CAD) and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) in patients who have survived an MI yet have a total cholesterol value
PubMed ID
7572695 View in PubMed
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Comparison of event and procedure rates following percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in patients with and without previous coronary artery bypass graft surgery [the ROSETTA (Routine versus Selective Exercise Treadmill Testing after Angioplasty) Registry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191825
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2002 Feb 1;89(3):251-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2002
Author
Philippe Garzon
Richard Sheppard
Mark J Eisenberg
David Schechter
Jeffrey Lefkovits
Evelyne Goudreau
Koon Hou Mak
David L Brown
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2002 Feb 1;89(3):251-6
Date
Feb-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - utilization
Coronary Artery Bypass
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Incidence
Israel - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Singapore - epidemiology
Stents
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
Victoria - epidemiology
Abstract
To compare 6-month post-percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) outcomes and cardiac procedure use among patients with and without prior coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, we examined 791 patients who were enrolled in the Routine versus Selective Exercise Treadmill Testing after Angioplasty (ROSETTA) Registry. The ROSETTA Registry is a prospective, multicenter registry that examines the use of functional testing after successful PTCA. Most patients were men (76%, mean age 61 +/- 11 years) who underwent single-vessel PTCA (85%) with stent implantation (58%). Baseline and procedural characteristics differed between patients with a prior CABG (n = 131) and patients with no prior CABG (n = 660), including Canadian Cardiovascular Society angina class III to IV (60% vs 49%, respectively, p = 0.03) and stenosis involving the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (10% vs 22%, p = 0.004). Event rates among patients with prior CABG were higher than among patients with no prior CABG, including unstable angina (19% vs 11%, p = 0.02), myocardial infarction (2% vs 1%, p = 0.2), death (4% vs 2%, p = 0.08), and composite clinical events (22% vs 12%, p = 0.003). Furthermore, patients with prior CABG had higher rates of follow-up cardiac procedures, including angiography (24% vs 14%, p = 0.008) and PTCA (13% vs 7%, p = 0.04), but not repeat CABG (2% vs 3%, p = 0.8). A multivariate analysis that included baseline clinical and procedural characteristics demonstrated that prior CABG was a significant independent predictor of clinical events and cardiac procedure use (odds ratio 2.3, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 3.5, p = 0.0001). Within the prior CABG group, patients with a PTCA of a bypass graft had a higher composite clinical event rate than patients with a PTCA of a native vessel (32% vs 17%, p = 0.05). In contrast, patients with a PTCA of a native vessel had event rates similar to those of patients with no prior CABG (17% vs 12%, p = 0.2). Thus, post-CABG patients have an increased risk of developing a cardiac event or needing a follow-up cardiac procedure during the 6 months after PTCA.
PubMed ID
11809424 View in PubMed
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Comparison of six-month outcomes of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in patients > or =75 with those <75 years of age (the ROSETTA registry).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194412
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2001 Jun 15;87(12):1392-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2001

Cost analysis of DNA-based testing in a large Canadian family with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178509
Source
Clin Genet. 2004 Oct;66(4):349-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
D M Gilchrist
D W Morrish
P J Bridge
J L Brown
Author Affiliation
Medical Genetics Clinic, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Clin Genet. 2004 Oct;66(4):349-52
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Medullary - genetics
Costs and Cost Analysis
DNA - analysis
DNA Mutational Analysis
Family
Female
Genetic Testing - economics
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Hirschsprung Disease - genetics
Humans
Male
Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2a - economics - genetics - surgery
Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2b - economics - genetics - surgery
Oncogene Proteins - genetics
Pedigree
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ret
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases - genetics
Thyroid Neoplasms - genetics - pathology
Thyroidectomy
Abstract
One of the major goals of genetic testing is the reduction of morbidity and mortality. Given the appropriate circumstances, this can result in reduction in health care costs. Such savings can be demonstrated most effectively in large families with mutations in well characterized, dominantly acting genes. In our large family, a point mutation TGC>CGC in exon 10 of the RET proto-oncogene, which results in a missense mutation (Cys620Arg), was identified in two individuals. The proband has medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), as did her deceased mother. One son has MTC and Hirschsprung's disease. The proband's mother had nine siblings; the proband has three siblings, another son, and 69 maternal cousins. Genetic testing has been performed on the closest relatives and has identified four individuals with, and 54 individuals without, a familial RET mutation. Significant cost savings have been realized in both genetic testing and clinical surveillance. In this family, for every at-risk individual identified as a true-negative, the minimum yearly savings in clinical surveillance is 508 dollars per person. As demonstrated by this case, economic costs of genetic diagnostics should take into account the potential saved monies in tests, both molecular and clinical.
PubMed ID
15355438 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.