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18 records – page 1 of 2.

Benzylpenicillin plus an aminoglycoside versus meropenem in neutropenic lymphoma and leukaemia patients with a suspected bacterial infection: a randomized, controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280370
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2017 Mar;23(3):179-187
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
D. Torfoss
T. Fladhagen
H. Holte
L. Brinch
F H Schjesvold
Y. Fløisand
E. Nyquist
J. Dalgaard
P. Meyer
A K Lehmann
J. Hammerstrøm
T. Skjelbakken
E A Høiby
L. Sandvik
S. Kvaløy
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2017 Mar;23(3):179-187
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aminoglycosides - administration & dosage
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Leukemia - complications
Lymphoma - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neutropenia - complications
Norway
Penicillin G - administration & dosage
Prospective Studies
Thienamycins - administration & dosage
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
In Norway, initial treatment of febrile neutropenia (FN) has traditionally been benzylpenicillin plus an aminoglycoside. Internationally, FN is often treated with a broad-spectrum ß-lactam antibiotic. We aimed to compare these two regimens in a prospective, randomized, trial in patients with lymphoma or leukaemia with an expected period of neutropenia =7 days, and a suspected bacterial infection.
Adult neutropenic patients with lymphoma or leukaemia, and a suspected bacterial infection, were randomized for treatment with benzylpenicillin plus an aminoglycoside or meropenem. The primary endpoint was clinical success, defined as no modification of antibiotics and clinical stability 72 h after randomization.
Among 322 randomized patients, 297 proved evaluable for analyses. Fifty-nine per cent (95% CI 51%-66%), (87/148) of the patients given benzylpenicillin plus an aminoglycoside were clinically stable, and had no antibiotic modifications 72 h after randomization, compared with 82% (95% CI 75%-87%), (122/149) of the patients given meropenem (p
PubMed ID
27793737 View in PubMed
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Carrier rate of resistant enterococci in a tertiary care hospital in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201753
Source
APMIS. 1999 Jun;107(6):545-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
D. Torfoss
P. Aukrust
L. Brinch
O. Mathiesen
G S Simonsen
A K Axelsen
P. Gaustad
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Microbiology, The National Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
APMIS. 1999 Jun;107(6):545-9
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anal Canal - microbiology
Bacterial Proteins - analysis
Carbon-Oxygen Ligases - analysis
Carrier state
Digestive System Surgical Procedures
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Enterococcus - chemistry - drug effects
Female
Gentamicins - pharmacology
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology
Hematology
Hospitals
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Surgery Department, Hospital
Vancomycin - pharmacology
beta-Lactam Resistance
Abstract
The prevalence of resistant enterococci varies geographically. In the present study we looked at the carrier rate of resistant enterococci in the hematology and gastrointestinal surgery units of a tertiary care hospital in Norway. Anal swabs were taken from all 82 hospitalized patients on 4 different dates, at least 4 weeks apart, in 1995. 51% had positive cultures for enterococci. 6% of all patients carried enterococci resistant to ampicillin. 7% carried enterococci with high-level gentamicin resistance. Two strains resistant to vancomycin were found, including the first vanA Enterococcus faecium isolated in a Norwegian hospital. There was a correlation between use of antibiotics and being a carrier of enterococci per se, but the correlation with resistant enterococci did not reach statistical significance owing to the small number of isolates. The carrier rates both for presence of enterococci and for resistant enterococci were generally lower than those found in other studies.
PubMed ID
10379681 View in PubMed
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[Chronic myeloid leukemia in health regions 1, 3, 4 and 5 during the period 1990-96]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20967
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 May 10;119(12):1733-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1999
Author
J. Lamvik
L. Brinch
I M Dahl
M. Sjo
I. Nesthus
J M Tangen
S. Berentsen
B. Ly
F V Shammas
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling, Regionsykehuset i Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 May 10;119(12):1733-6
Date
May-10-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
English Abstract
Female
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Abstract
The aim of the present investigation was to obtain information about treatment, clinical course and outcome for all patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia through a six-year period in a defined part of Norway. A total number of 141 patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria. This is equivalent to 0.9 patients per 100,000 per year. The median age was 62 years. More than 70% of the patients were primarily treated with hydroxyurea, either alone or combined with interferon. 40 out of 57 patients younger than 55 years underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Median survival for all patients was 36 months with an estimated five-year survival rate of 33%. Patients older than 55 years had a median survival of 30 months with 16% alive after five years. The five-year survival rate for patients younger than 55 years was 56%, for transplanted patients 72%. 60 of 84 patients older than 55 years have died after 4 1/2 years median observation time. Two thirds of those died of leukaemia; one third of other causes. 23 of 57 patients younger than 55 years have died. 11 of them had had transplantations and most of them died from transplantation-related causes, while leukaemia was the dominating cause of death in the others.
PubMed ID
10380587 View in PubMed
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Cost analysis of autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18424
Source
Clin Lab Haematol. 2003 Jun;25(3):179-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
V. Mishra
S. Vaaler
L. Brinch
Author Affiliation
Health Professional Support Department, The Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. vinod.mishra@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Clin Lab Haematol. 2003 Jun;25(3):179-84
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cryopreservation - economics
Female
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization - economics
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - economics - therapy
Nursing Care
Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation - economics
Prospective Studies
Transplantation, Autologous
Abstract
High-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) support is a common but expensive treatment for various hematological malignancies. A prospective cost analysis of evaluation/mobilization and the HDC + PBSC phase for patients with multiple myeloma was performed. Eleven consecutive patients at the National University Hospital Oslo, taking part in a Nordic treatment protocol, were included in the analysis during the period from May 1999 to December 2000. Clinical and resource use data were obtained prospectively on a daily basis registration and from patient records.The total cost for the evaluation/mobilization and the HDC + PBSC phase varied from 22,999 US dollars to 61,722 US dollars (mean 38,186 US dollars; median 30,569 US dollars). The mean length of hospital stay for the evaluation/mobilization phase was 8 days (range 4-17 days) and for the HDC + PBSC phase 19 days (range 14-29 days). A statistically significant correlation was found between the length of hospital stay and hospital costs for both phases (P
PubMed ID
12755795 View in PubMed
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Cost of autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: the Norwegian experience from a multicenter cost study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174911
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2005 Jun;35(12):1149-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
V. Mishra
S. Andresen
L. Brinch
S. Kvaløy
P. Ernst
M K Lønset
J M Tangen
J. Wikelund
C. Flatum
E. Baggerød
B. Helle
S. Vaaler
T P Hagen
Author Affiliation
Health Professional Support Department, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. vinod.mishra@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2005 Jun;35(12):1149-53
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cryopreservation - economics
Cytapheresis - economics
Financing, Government
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization - economics
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Norway
Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation - economics
Prospective Studies
Transplantation, Autologous
Abstract
High-dose therapy with autologous blood progenitor cell support is now routinely used for patients with certain malignant lymphomas and multiple myeloma. We performed a prospective cost analysis of the mobilization, harvesting and cryopreservation phases and the high-dose therapy with stem cell reinfusion and hospitalization phases. In total, 40 consecutive patients were studied at four different university hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data on direct costs were obtained on a daily basis. Data on indirect costs were allocated to the specific patient based on estimates of relevant department costs (ie the service department's costs), and by means of predefined allocation keys. All cost data were calculated at 2001 prices. The mean total costs for the two phases were US$ 32,160 (range US$ 19,092-50,550). The mean total length of hospital stay for two phases was 31 days (range 27-37). A large part of the actual cost in the harvest phase was attributed to stem cell mobilization, including growth factors, harvesting and cryopreservation. In the high-dose chemotherapy phase, the most significant part of the costs was nursing staff. Average total costs were considerably higher than actual DRG-based reimbursement from the government, indicating that the treatment of these patients was heavily subsidized by the basic hospital grants.
PubMed ID
15880133 View in PubMed
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Health-related quality of life in multiple myeloma patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy with autologous blood stem-cell support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19364
Source
Med Oncol. 2001;18(1):65-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
N. Gulbrandsen
F. Wisløff
L. Brinch
K. Carlson
I M Dahl
P. Gimsing
E. Hippe
M. Hjorth
L M Knudsen
J. Lamvik
S. Lenhoff
E. Løfvenberg
I. Nesthus
J L Nielsen
I. Turesson
J. Westin
Author Affiliation
Department of Hematology, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. nina.gulbrandsen@ioks.uio.no
Source
Med Oncol. 2001;18(1):65-77
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Appetite
Female
Health status
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Male
Melphalan - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - drug therapy
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sleep Disorders - chemically induced
Social Behavior
Social Support
Survival Analysis
Abstract
In a population-based study, the Nordic Myeloma Study Group found a survival advantage for high-dose melphalan with autologous blood stem-cell support compared to conventional chemotherapy in myeloma patients under 60 yr of age (risk ratio: 1.62; confidence interval [CI] 1.22-2.15; p = 0.001). A study of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was integrated in the trial, using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Of the 274 patients receiving intensive therapy 221 (81%) were compared to 113 (94%) of 120 patients receiving conventional melphalan-prednisone treatment. Prior to treatment, there were no statistically significant differences in any HRQoL score between the two groups. One month after the start of induction chemotherapy, the patients on intensive treatment had more sleep disturbance than the control patients. At 6 mo, corresponding to a mean of 52 d after high-dose melphalan, the patients on intensive treatment had moderately lower scores for global QoL and role and social functioning and there was also a significantly higher score for appetite loss. At 12 and 24 mo, the HRQoL was similar to that of the control patients. At 36 mo, there was a trend toward less fatigue, pain, nausea, and appetite loss in the intensive-treatment group. Thus, the 18 mo of prolonged survival seem to be associated with a good health-related quality of life. Despite the moderate HRQoL reduction associated with the early intensive chemotherapy phase, this treatment modality must be regarded as an important step forward in the care of multiple myeloma.
PubMed ID
11778972 View in PubMed
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[High dose therapy with autologous stem cell support--finally a progress in myelomatosis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19513
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Aug 30;121(20):2402-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-2001
Author
F. Wisløff
J M Tangen
L. Brinch
I M Dahl
F X Gruber
J. Hammerstrøm
A. Waage
I. Nesthus
P. Ernst
Author Affiliation
Hematologisk avdeling Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. f.g.b.wisloff@ioks.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Aug 30;121(20):2402-6
Date
Aug-30-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating - administration & dosage
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal - administration & dosage
Clinical Trials
Comparative Study
Cost-Benefit Analysis
English Abstract
Follow-Up Studies
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Melphalan - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Prednisone - administration & dosage
Prognosis
Transplantation, Autologous
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Since the introduction of the simple cyclic oral treatment with melphalan and prednisone in the late 1960s, there has been no substantial improvement in the therapy of multiple myeloma. In 1994, the Nordic Myeloma Study Group initiated a population-based, prospective study to evaluate the impact on survival of high dose chemotherapy in newly diagnosed, symptomatic patients under 60 years of age, compared to a conventionally treated control group. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 274 patients were treated according to a specified high dose protocol and compared to 274 patients from previous population-based trials fulfilling the same eligibility criteria. RESULTS: Median survival was 44 months in the control group and 62 months in the intensive treatment group (risk ratio 1.65; 95% CI = 1.28-2.14, P = 0.0001). A study of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) which was integrated in the trial showed a moderately reduced HRQoL associated with the intensive treatment phase, but no statistically significant difference beyond the first year of follow-up. In a cost-utility analysis of the trial, the cost per (quality-adjusted life years) was estimated at USD 26,000. INTERPRETATION: The incremental cost of the treatment is within what is usually thought to be acceptable limits. Further improvement of the results and reduction of stay in hospital would give an even more favourable cost-utility ratio.
PubMed ID
11603051 View in PubMed
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Impact on survival of high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell support in patients younger than 60 years with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma: a population-based study. Nordic Myeloma Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20679
Source
Blood. 2000 Jan 1;95(1):7-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2000
Author
S. Lenhoff
M. Hjorth
E. Holmberg
I. Turesson
J. Westin
J L Nielsen
F. Wislöff
L. Brinch
K. Carlson
M. Carlsson
I M Dahl
P. Gimsing
E. Hippe
H. Johnsen
J. Lamvik
E. Löfvenberg
I. Nesthus
S. Rödjer
Author Affiliation
Department of Hematology, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Blood. 2000 Jan 1;95(1):7-11
Date
Jan-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Confidence Intervals
Dexamethasone - administration & dosage
Disease-Free Survival
Doxorubicin - administration & dosage
Female
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - mortality - therapy
Remission Induction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salvage Therapy
Scandinavia
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Vincristine - administration & dosage
Abstract
High-dose therapy has become a common treatment for myeloma. The objectives of this study were to estimate in a prospective, population-based setting the impact on survival of high-dose therapy in newly diagnosed, symptomatic patients less than 60 years old and to compare the results with those of conventionally treated historic controls. The prospective population comprised 348 patients. Of these, 274 were treated according to a specified intensive-therapy protocol (Nordic Myeloma Study Group [NMSG] #5/94) and constituted the intensive-therapy group. The historic population consisted of 313 patients identified from 5 previous population-based Nordic studies. Of these, 274 fulfilled the eligibility criteria for high-dose therapy stated in NMSG #5/94 and constituted the control group. The expected numbers of patients in the prospective population and the historic population were 450 and 410, respectively, estimated from previously established data on the incidence in this population and the population base for each study. Survival was prolonged in the intensive-therapy group compared with the control group (risk ratio for the control group 1.62; 95% confidence interval 1.22-2.15; P =.001). These groups represented more than 60% of the expected number of patients. When survival for all the registered patients in the 2 populations was compared, representing more than 75% of the expected number of patients, the advantage for the prospective population persisted (risk ratio for the historic population 1.46; 95% confidence interval 1.14-1.86; P =. 002). These results indicate that the introduction of high-dose therapy for newly diagnosed myeloma has resulted in prolonged survival for the total patient population aged less than 60 years. (Blood. 2000; 95:7-11)
PubMed ID
10607678 View in PubMed
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Late relapses after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood: a population-based study from the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25613
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 1989;17(1):45-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
R. Nygaard
P J Moe
H. Brincker
N. Clausen
R. Nyman
M. Perkkiö
M E Eilertsen
O J Johansen
M. Väre
L. Brinch
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 1989;17(1):45-7
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - mortality - therapy
Male
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scandinavia
Abstract
Seven late relapses of acute lymphoblastic leukemia occurring 5.5 to 12.3 years after cessation of therapy are reported in 986 patients who had discontinued treatment for leukemia acquired before the age of 15. The study covers patients from the five Nordic countries. Of the 434 patients with ALL who had passed 5 years of follow-up without recurrence, seven have subsequently relapsed so far; an estimated cumulative proportion of 6.9% within the 10 years. In addition, we report a girl 15.9 years old at diagnosis who relapsed 7.3 years after cessation of therapy. These findings confirm that "cure" of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated in the 1970s cannot be considered definite, even 5 years after discontinuation of therapy.
PubMed ID
2913474 View in PubMed
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Lung transplantation for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after allo-SCT.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119884
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2013 May;48(5):703-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
A M Holm
G C Riise
L. Hansson
L. Brinch
O. Bjørtuft
M. Iversen
S. Simonsen
Y. Fløisand
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. a.m.holm@medisin.uio.no
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2013 May;48(5):703-7
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bronchiolitis Obliterans - epidemiology - surgery
Child
Female
Graft vs Host Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Hematologic Neoplasms - surgery
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - adverse effects - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Lung Transplantation - adverse effects - methods - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Chronic GVHD (cGVHD) associated bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) is a serious complication after allo-SCT, and lung transplantation (LTx) may be the ultimate treatment option. To evaluate this treatment, data on all patients with LTx after allo-SCT ever performed in Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland were recorded and compared with survival data from the Scandiatransplant registry. In total, LTx after allo-SCT had been performed in 13 patients. Allo-SCT was done because of AML (n=6), CML (n=3), ALL (n=2), immunodeficiency (n=1) and aplastic anemia (n=1). All developed clinical cGVHD, with median interval from allo-SCT to LTx of 8.2 (0.7-16) years. Median age at LTx was 34 (16-55) years, and the median postoperative observation time was 4.2 (0.1-15) years. Two patients died, one due to septicemia, the other of relapsing leukemia, after 2 and 14 months, respectively. Four developed BOS, one of these was retransplanted. The survival did not significantly differ from the survival in matched LTx controls, being 90% 1 year and 75% 5 years after LTx compared with 85% and 68% in the controls. We therefore suggest that LTx may be considered in carefully selected patients with BOS due to cGVHD after allo-SCT.
PubMed ID
23064037 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.