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Cadmium, mercury, and lead in kidney cortex of the general Swedish population: a study of biopsies from living kidney donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61832
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Nov;107(11):867-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
L. Barregård
C. Svalander
A. Schütz
G. Westberg
G. Sällsten
I. Blohmé
J. Mölne
P O Attman
P. Haglind
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. larsbarregard@ymk.gu.se
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Nov;107(11):867-71
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biopsy
Cadmium - analysis
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Diet
Female
Humans
Kidney Cortex - chemistry - pathology
Lead - analysis
Living Donors
Male
Mercury - analysis
Middle Aged
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sweden
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
Cadmium, mercury, and lead concentrations were determined in deep-frozen kidney cortex biopsies taken from 36 living, healthy Swedish kidney donors (18 males and 18 females), who were 30-71 (mean 53) years of age. Information about occupation, smoking, the presence of dental amalgam, and fish consumption could be obtained for 27 of the donors. The samples (median dry weight 0.74 mg) were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the results were transformed to wet-weight concentrations. The median kidney Cd was 17 micrograms/g (95% confidence interval, 14-23 micrograms/g), which was similar in males and females. In 10 active smokers, the median kidney Cd was 24 micrograms/g, and in 12 who never smoked, it was 17 micrograms/g. The median kidney Hg was 0.29 micrograms/g, with higher levels in females (median 0.54 micrograms/g) than in males (median 0.16 micrograms/g). Subjects with amalgam fillings had higher kidney Hg (median 0.47 micrograms/g, n = 20) than those without dental amalgam (median 0.15 micrograms;g/g, n = 6), but kidney Hg was below the detection limit in some samples. Nearly half of the samples had kidney Pb below the detection limit. The median kidney Pb was estimated as 0. 14 micrograms/g. This is the first study of heavy metals in kidney cortex of living, healthy subjects, and the results are relatively similar to those of a few previous autopsy studies, indicating that results from autopsy cases are not seriously biased in relation to kidney metal concentrations in the general population. Cd concentrations in those who never smoked were relatively high, indicating considerable Cd intake from the diet in Sweden. The effect of dental amalgam on kidney Hg was as expected, although the reason for the difference in Hg levels between males and females is unclear.
PubMed ID
10544153 View in PubMed
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Childhood tuberculosis and exposure to indoor air pollution: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269091
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2015 May;19(5):596-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
N. Jafta
P M Jeena
L. Barregard
R N Naidoo
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2015 May;19(5):596-602
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child health
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
Male
Needs Assessment
Pediatrics
Risk assessment
Sweden
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Abstract
Indoor air pollution (IAP) from environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and biomass fuel smoke (BMS) poses respiratory health risks, with children and women bearing the major burden.
We used a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the relation between childhood tuberculosis (TB) and exposure to ETS and BMS.
We searched three databases for epidemiological studies that investigated the association of childhood TB with exposure to ETS and BMS. We calculated pooled estimates and heterogeneity for studies eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis and stratified studies on ETS by outcome.
Five case-control and three cross-sectional studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis and quality assessment. Pooled effect estimates showed that exposure to ETS is associated with tuberculous infection and TB disease (OR 1.9, 95%CI 1.4-2.9) among exposed compared to non-exposed children. TB disease in ETS studies produced a pooled OR of 2.8 (95%CI 0.9-4.8), which was higher than the OR for tuberculous infection (OR 1.9, 95%CI 0.9-2.9) for children exposed to ETS compared to non-exposed children. Studies on BMS exposure were too few and too small to permit a conclusion.
Exposure to ETS increases the risk of childhood TB disease or tuberculous infection.
PubMed ID
25868030 View in PubMed
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Chronic and acute effects of solvents on central nervous system functions in floorlayers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75223
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1986 Feb;43(2):101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1986
Author
K. Ekberg
L. Barregård
S. Hagberg
G. Sällsten
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1986 Feb;43(2):101-6
Date
Feb-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adhesives - adverse effects
Adult
Central Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Floors and Floorcoverings
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Psychological Tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solvents - adverse effects
Substance-Related Disorders - etiology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Floorlayers and age matched carpenters with long (greater than or equal to 20 years) and short (5-10 years) occupational experience were compared with respect to chronic and acute neuropsychiatric, neuropsychological, and general health effects as related to different types of solvent exposure. An increased prevalence of neuropsychiatric illness occurred among floorlayers with long occupational experience, possibly caused by high levels of exposure which were present until the 1970s. The disease appears partly reversible since, at the time of the investigation, all had essentially recovered. Some impairment of performance in psychological tests was seen, however, in this group. Visuoanalytical impairment was associated with indices of exposure to glues based on alcohols whereas contact adhesives appeared more deleterious to perceptual functions. The increased prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms among the floorlayers was interpreted to reflect mainly acute effects on the central nervous system.
PubMed ID
3484970 View in PubMed
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Contact allergy and hand eczema in Swedish dentists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197081
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2000 Oct;43(4):192-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
L M Wallenhammar
U. Ortengren
H. Andreasson
L. Barregård
B. Björkner
S. Karlsson
K. Wrangsjö
B. Meding
Author Affiliation
Occupational Dermatology, National Institute for Working Life, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2000 Oct;43(4):192-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - adverse effects
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Linking Reagents - adverse effects
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Irritant - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - diagnosis - epidemiology
Eczema - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Gold Sodium Thiosulfate - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Irritants - adverse effects
Male
Methacrylates - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Nickel - adverse effects
Perfume - adverse effects
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Thiram - adverse effects
Abstract
Hand eczema and contact allergy in Swedish dentists were studied in a multidisciplinary project. The aims of the study were to establish diagnoses, to investigate the occurrence of contact allergy, in particular to (meth)acrylates, and to evaluate certain consequences of hand eczema. A postal questionnaire on skin symptoms, atopy and occupational experience was mailed to 3,500 dentists aged
PubMed ID
11011917 View in PubMed
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Enzymuria in workers exposed to inorganic mercury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233884
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1988;61(1-2):65-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
L. Barregård
B. Hultberg
A. Schütz
G. Sällsten
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Sahlgren Hospital, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1988;61(1-2):65-9
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylglucosaminidase - urine
Albuminuria - chemically induced
Chemical Industry
Clinical Enzyme Tests
Cross-Sectional Studies
Hexosaminidases - urine
Humans
Kidney Diseases - chemically induced - diagnosis
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mercury - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - diagnosis
Sweden
Abstract
Urinary excretion of beta-hexosaminidase (NAG = N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase) and albumin was examined in 41 chlor-alkali workers exposed to inorganic mercury and 41 age-matched controls. Either U-HG or B-Hg levels for these workers were available dating from the 1960s to the present. Increased U-NAG was seen in workers with a U-Hg today of more than 4 micrograms/mmol creat (about 50 micrograms/l: 35 ug/g creat). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that U-NAG was correlated to U-Hg and integrated dose but not to the present B-Hg level. No albuminuria (detection limit 12.5 mg/l) was found in any of the subjects. In a longitudinal study, no decrease in U-NAG levels was seen in 15 chlor-alkali workers after their vacation (means = 20d). In five workers followed for ten months after a short exposure period, no definite time trend could be seen. The results show that there is a slight effect on renal tubules even at rather low levels of exposure to mercury vapour. The clinical significance of the enzymuria levels found here is, however, debatable.
PubMed ID
3264272 View in PubMed
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Etiologic factors influencing the prevalence of demarcated opacities in permanent first molars in a group of Swedish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15460
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2001 Aug;109(4):230-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
B. Jälevik
J G Norén
G. Klingberg
L. Barregård
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Göteborg University, Sweden. birgitta.jalevik@vgregion.se
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2001 Aug;109(4):230-4
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - complications
Breast Feeding
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Confidence Intervals
Dental Enamel - abnormalities
Drug Therapy
Female
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Genetics
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Molar - abnormalities
Multivariate Analysis
Obstetric Labor Complications
Odds Ratio
Pneumonia - complications
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Statistics
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine possible etiological factors for a developmental enamel defect, i.e. demarcated opacities, affecting the permanent first molars. A questionnaire about possible etiological factors of enamel developmental defects was filled in by the parents of 8-yr-old children (n=516) prior to a dental examination of permanent teeth. Demarcated opacities of permanent first molars had been found in 18.4% of the children in a previous study of these children. Fifteen % had more than one tooth affected indicating systemic causation. Questions were asked about mother's health and medication during pregnancy, birth complications, health and medication of the child during the first 3 yr of life, breast-feeding, heredity, and fluoride supplements. The affected children, especially the boys, were reported to have had more health problems, in particular asthma (but only 4 cases), during the first year of life. Use of antibiotics was also more common among the affected children, but owing to a strong co-variance with health problems these factors could not be separated. Breast-feeding history was similar in children with and without enamel defects. The etiology of hypomineralized first molars is not yet fully understood, but based on the results of this retrospective study, health problems in infancy, especially respiratory diseases, seem to be involved.
PubMed ID
11531068 View in PubMed
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[Exposure to mercury--an evaluation of occupational risk factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230742
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 May 30;109(15):1642-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-1989

Exposure to mercury vapor and impact on health in the dental profession in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52690
Source
J Dent Res. 1997 Jul;76(7):1397-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
S. Langworth
G. Sällsten
L. Barregård
I. Cynkier
M L Lind
E. Söderman
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Dent Res. 1997 Jul;76(7):1397-404
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects - analysis
Dental Assistants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dentists, Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mercury - adverse effects - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Psychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Volatilization
Abstract
Possible adverse effects of mercury exposure in dentistry have been discussed in several studies. The objective of the present study was to carry out detailed measurements of mercury exposure in the dental profession in Sweden, and to search for adverse health effects from such exposure. We examined 22 dentists and 22 dental nurses, working in teams, at six Swedish dental clinics. Measurements of air mercury, performed with personal, active air samplers, showed a median air Hg of 1.8 micrograms/m3 for the dentists, and 2.1 micrograms/m3 for the dental nurses. Spot measurements with a direct reading instrument displayed temporarily elevated air Hg, especially during the preparation and application of amalgam. The average concentration of mercury in whole blood (B-Hg) was 18 nmol/L, in plasma (P-Hg) 5.1 nmol/L, and in urine (U-Hg) 3.0 nmol/mmol creatinine. Possible effects on the central nervous system (CNS) were registered with three questionnaires: Q16, Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI), and the Profile of Mood Scales (POMS). In the Q16, the number of symptoms was statistically significantly higher in the dentistry group compared with an age- and gender-matched control group (n = 44). The urinary excretion of albumin and urinary activity of the tubular enzyme N-acetyl-beta-glucose-aminidase (NAG) did not differ between the two groups. The results confirm that exposure to mercury in the dental profession in Sweden is low. The air Hg levels were mainly influenced by the method of amalgam preparation and inserting, and by the method of air evacuation during drilling and polishing.
PubMed ID
9207773 View in PubMed
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Gamma radiation doses to people living in Western Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159898
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2008 Feb;99(2):394-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
S. Almgren
M. Isaksson
L. Barregard
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Physics, Göteborg University, SU/Sahlgrenska, SE-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden. sara.almgren@radfys.gu.se
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2008 Feb;99(2):394-403
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure
Gamma Rays
Humans
Luminescence
Pilot Projects
Radiation Dosage
Radon - analysis - toxicity
Sweden
Abstract
Indoor environments contribute to gamma radiation in the general population. The aims of the present study were to investigate average gamma radiation doses in a rural and an urban area of Sweden, compare indoor dose rates with personal exposure, and study the effects of building characteristics on radiation levels. Radiation was measured with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). Repeated measurements were performed with TLDs worn by participants (n=46) and placed in their dwellings. Personal dose rates were 0.092microSv/h (rural) and 0.096microSv/h (urban). The mean effective gamma dose rates in dwellings were 0.091microSv/h (rural) and 0.11microSv/h (urban), which are higher than the world average. Dose rates in apartments were higher than in detached houses and higher for concrete than wooden dwellings. Personal dose rates were strongly associated with dwelling dose rates (r(p)=0.68, p
PubMed ID
18069099 View in PubMed
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Hand-arm vibration syndrome in Swedish car mechanics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186114
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2003 Apr;60(4):287-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
L. Barregard
L. Ehrenström
K. Marcus
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Sweden. lars.barregard@ymk.gu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2003 Apr;60(4):287-94
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Automobiles
Hand - innervation
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Raynaud Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
To assess the occurrence of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) in Swedish car mechanics, and the relation between HAVS and duration of exposure.
A total of 806 mechanics answered a questionnaire on vascular and neurological symptoms, and exposure to vibrations. Mechanics with symptoms, and some mechanics without symptoms, were invited to a clinical examination, including also a timed Allen test. Vascular and neurological symptoms were classified using the Stockholm Workshop scales. The mean daily exposure (mainly using nut-runners) was 14 minutes and the mean exposure duration, 12 years. Published data have shown vibration levels in nut-runners of about 3.5 m/s(2).
In the questionnaire, 24% reported cold induced white finger (WF), 25% persistent numbness, and 13%, reduced grip force. The clinical examination showed a prevalence of vibration induced white finger (VWF) of about 15%, mainly in stage 2, and after 20 years, of 25%. A survival analysis showed similar results. We found that the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) model underestimates the risk of VWF. The incidence after 1975 was 19 cases per 1000 person-years. Slow refill times in the timed Allen test were common (15% had a refill time of >20 seconds), and associated with the presence of VWF. The clinical examination revealed neurological symptoms in the hands in about 25% of subjects, mainly at stage 2. After 20 years, the prevalence was 40%. The questionnaire items on WF and numbness both showed likelihood ratios of 13.
HAVS is common among Swedish car mechanics in spite of short daily exposure times. This underlines the need for preventive measures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12660377 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.