Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Children's nutrient intake at preschool and at home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32101
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2001 May;90(5):483-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
H. Sepp
M. Lennernäs
R. Pettersson
L. Abrahamsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Domestic Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden. Hanna.Sepp@ihv.uu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2001 May;90(5):483-91
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Nutrition
Child, Preschool
Diet
Diet Records
Energy intake
Female
Food Services
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools, Nursery
Sweden
Abstract
A preschool-based dietary survey, using 7-d records, was carried out in a suburb of Stockholm. The aim was to assess the intake of food and the quality of the diet of preschool children aged 3-5 y at preschool and at home, and to compare the dietary intake with the Swedish dietary recommendations for preschool children. The respective mean intakes of protein, fat, carbohydrates and sucrose, expressed as a percentage of total energy intake were 14, 38, 50 and 9 at preschool, and at home 14, 36, 52 and 12 on weekdays, 14, 34, 55 and 16 on weekend days. The mean intakes of seven vitamins and minerals were low only for selenium as compared with the recommended level. No differences were found in nutrient density between diet at preschool and diet at home, with the exception of dietary fibre (higher at preschool). On weekdays there was a significantly higher nutrient density for calcium, zinc, selenium, vitamin A, riboflavin, vitamin C and dietary fibre compared with weekend days. CONCLUSION: The average intakes of energy and nutrients per meal at preschool compared with the recommended levels for children aged 4-6 y were low for all meals (breakfast, lunch and afternoon snack). This, however, was compensated for by home meals.
PubMed ID
11430705 View in PubMed
Less detail

A national framework for district nurses' uniform documentation patient records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210364
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1997;46:401-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
I. Rising
M. Ehnfors
L. Abrahamsson
A. Borgström
B M Forsgren
S. Hellström
Author Affiliation
Centre for Medical Informatics in General Practice, Sollentuna, Sweden.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1997;46:401-3
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Forms and Records Control - methods
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - organization & administration
Nursing Records
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
Vocabulary, Controlled
PubMed ID
10184816 View in PubMed
Less detail

[One year experience from a separate youth health centre at Kristianstad]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74698
Source
Lakartidningen. 1973 Aug 15;70(33):2847-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1973

Production economics analysis of investment initiated to improve working environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199243
Source
Appl Ergon. 2000 Feb;31(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
L. Abrahamsson
Author Affiliation
Industrial Production Environment, Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden. Lena.Abrahamsson@arb.luth.se
Source
Appl Ergon. 2000 Feb;31(1):1-7
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost Savings
Environment Design
Human Engineering - economics
Humans
Metallurgy - economics
Steel
Sweden
Workplace
Abstract
This article describes the results of an evaluation of a new work place for ladle preparation at Swedish Steel in Luleå, Sweden. The company initiated a development project related to ladle service work, in order to come to grips with the difficult working environment and problems associated with absenteeism due to illness and occupational injuries. The evaluation was performed for the first three years after implementation of the project and it shows that the new work place considerably improved working conditions and increased both the quality and efficiency of production. The purpose of this article is also to discuss some methodological problems. The follow-up of the various changes in working environment and personnel statistics was fairly simple to carry out. But in terms of production effects, the company's in-house production follow-up system proved to be too unspecified and oversimplified. It was also difficult to decide which changes should count as effects of the new work place and to value these in monetary terms. The profitability calculation shows that an investment initiated to improve the working environment can yield good profitability.
PubMed ID
10709746 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quality of rolled barley flakes as affected by batch of grain and processing technique.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62096
Source
Plant Foods Hum Nutr. 1994 Feb;45(2):145-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
B. Sundberg
L. Abrahamsson
P. Aman
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
Source
Plant Foods Hum Nutr. 1994 Feb;45(2):145-54
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dietary Carbohydrates - analysis
Dietary Fiber - analysis
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Food Handling
Hordeum - chemistry
Humans
Nutritive Value
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Starch - analysis
Sweden
Taste
Viscosity
Abstract
Rolled barely flakes were prepared from three different batches of grain by pearling, steaming and rolling. Autoclaved and malted barleys from the three batches were also processed in the same way. Analysis of the nine products showed that both batch of barley and process had significant effects on chemical composition and viscosity. Puddings were prepared from the products and mechanical consistency, juiciness and grain consistency were graded on both newly prepared and heated puddings by a sensory taste panel. Batch of barley had no effect on mechanical consistency but significant effects on juiciness and grain consistency. Type of processing had significant effect on all three parameters for both newly prepared and heated puddings.
PubMed ID
8153065 View in PubMed
Less detail