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Bronchiolitis-associated hospitalizations among American Indian and Alaska Native children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6083
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2000 Jan;19(1):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
S A Lowther
D K Shay
R C Holman
M J Clarke
S F Kaufman
L J Anderson
Author Affiliation
Respiratory and Enteric Viruses Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. SGL6@cdc.gov
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2000 Jan;19(1):11-7
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Bronchiolitis - ethnology - virology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - diagnosis - ethnology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract illness among infants and young children. Respiratory system diseases account for a large proportion of hospitalizations in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children; however, aggregate estimates of RSV-associated hospitalizations among AI/AN children have not been made. METHODS: We used Indian Health Service hospitalization data from 1990 through 1995 to describe hospitalizations associated with bronchiolitis, the most characteristic clinical manifestation of RSV infection, among AI/AN children
Notes
Comment In: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2000 May;19(5):49210819360
PubMed ID
10643844 View in PubMed
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Human rabies in the United States, 1960 to 1979: epidemiology, diagnosis, and prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240546
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1984 May;100(5):728-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1984
Author
L J Anderson
K G Nicholson
R V Tauxe
W G Winkler
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1984 May;100(5):728-35
Date
May-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - analysis - cerebrospinal fluid
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Immunization, Passive
Male
Middle Aged
Rabies - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy - transmission
Rabies virus - immunology
Time Factors
United States
Vaccination
Abstract
Thirty-eight cases of human rabies occurred in the United States and its territories from 1960 to 1979. The major source of exposure to rabies has changed from indigenous dogs and cats in the 1940s and 1950s to wild carnivores and bats (11 of the 27 cases with known exposures); unusual exposures (3 cases) and exposures in a foreign country (7 cases) have also become more important. No exposure could be identified for 6 of the 38 cases. Two patients received optimal prophylaxis, 14 suboptimal, and 22 no prophylaxis after exposure. Some cases might have been prevented by an increased awareness of the risks and treatment for exposure to rabies, and use of the new rabies vaccines. The diagnosis was often made late in the clinical course including after death in 8 cases. This delay, in part, resulted from the diversity in the clinical presentation. Rabies should be considered in any case of encephalitis or myelitis. Laboratory confirmation of the diagnosis was often delayed. Testing for serum antibodies was the most reliable test in unvaccinated patients, and isolation of virus was the test most likely to be positive early in the illness.
PubMed ID
6712036 View in PubMed
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Investigation of porcine parvovirus among persons with hemophilia receiving Hyate:C porcine factor VIII concentrate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198136
Source
Transfusion. 2000 Jun;40(6):708-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
J M Soucie
D D Erdman
B L Evatt
L J Anderson
T J Török
M. El-Jamil
E. Barnhart
M. Tepper
H N Burrill
A M Pickett
W L Mengeling
Author Affiliation
Division of AIDS, STD, and TB Laboratory Research, and the Respiratory and Enterovirus Branch, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30033, USA. jps9@cdc.gov
Source
Transfusion. 2000 Jun;40(6):708-11
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Canada - epidemiology
DNA, Viral - blood
Drug Contamination
Factor VIII - adverse effects
Hemophilia A - complications - therapy
Humans
Male
Parvoviridae - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Parvoviridae Infections - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Retrospective Studies
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Single-Blind Method
Swine - blood - virology
Swine Diseases - transmission
United States - epidemiology
Viremia - veterinary
Zoonoses
Abstract
Porcine clotting factor has been used for more than 15 years to treat severe bleeding episodes in persons with hemophilia who have antibodies to human clotting factor. In 1996, QC procedures revealed for the first time the presence of porcine parvovirus (PPV) in the product. This report describes an investigation to determine the extent of product contamination and to evaluate past recipients of porcine clotting factor (Hyate:C, Speywood Biopharm) for evidence of PPV infection.
Stored specimens from 22 lots of previously released Hyate:C were tested for the presence of PPV DNA by PCR and nested PCR assays. Serum specimens from 98 recipients of Hyate:C and 24 controls who did not receive Hyate:C were tested for PPV antibodies by an immunofluorescence assay.
PPV DNA was detected in product from 21 of the 22 lots of Hyate:C, primarily by nested PCR testing. In contrast, none of the serum specimens from the 98 Hyate:C recipients tested positive for PPV IgG antibodies.
The risk of human disease from percutaneous exposure to low levels of PPV seems to be low. Nevertheless, the theoretical risk of human infection with PPV has led to manufacturing changes, including PCR screening of all porcine plasma, which are designed to eliminate this risk.
PubMed ID
10864993 View in PubMed
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Multicenter study of strains of respiratory syncytial virus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226594
Source
J Infect Dis. 1991 Apr;163(4):687-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
L J Anderson
R M Hendry
L T Pierik
C. Tsou
K. McIntosh
Author Affiliation
Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia.
Source
J Infect Dis. 1991 Apr;163(4):687-92
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens, Viral - analysis
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Infant
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses - classification - immunology - isolation & purification
Respirovirus Infections - microbiology
United States
Abstract
Two major groups of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) strains, A and B, have been identified and their patterns of isolation determined in different communities but not simultaneously in multiple communities. In this study, we tested 483 RSV isolates from 14 university laboratories in the United States and Canada for the 1984/1985 and 1985/1986 RSV seasons; 303 (63%) isolates were group A, 114 (24%) were group B, and 66 (14%) could not be grouped. Isolates were subdivided into six subgroups within group A and three within group B; up to six and often four or more different subgroups were isolated in the same laboratory during the same RSV season. The pattern of group and subgroup isolations varied among laboratories during the same year and between years for the same laboratory. These differences suggest that RSV outbreaks are community, possibly regional, but not national phenomena. The ability to identify group and subgroup differences in isolates is a powerful tool for epidemiologic studies of RSV.
PubMed ID
2010623 View in PubMed
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