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Educational achievements of children of parents with multiple sclerosis: A nationwide register-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281724
Source
J Neurol. 2016 Nov;263(11):2229-2237
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
J Y Moberg
M. Magyari
N. Koch-Henriksen
L C Thygesen
B. Laursen
P. Soelberg Sørensen
Source
J Neurol. 2016 Nov;263(11):2229-2237
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Child of Impaired Parents - education - psychology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - psychology
Parents - psychology
Probability
Registries
Sex Distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Little is known about the impact of parental multiple sclerosis (MS) on offspring's educational attainment. The objective of the study was to examine educational achievements in offspring of parents with MS compared with matched children of parents without MS in a nationwide register-based cohort study. Children of all Danish-born residents with onset between 1950 and 1986 were identified by linking the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry with the Civil Registration System. Twins, children with MS, and emigrated persons were excluded. The reference cohort consisted of randomly drawn individuals from the Civil Registration System without parental MS matched 8:1 to the MS offspring by sex and year of birth. Information about education was linked to the cohorts from nationwide educational registries. We included 4177 children of MS parents and 33,416 reference persons. Children of MS parents achieved statistically significant higher average grades than the reference cohort in their final exam of basic school with a mean grade difference of 0.46 (95 % CI 0.22-0.69; p = 0.0002). We found no difference in achievement of educational level above basic school (OR 1.04; 95 % CI 0.98-1.10; p = 0.20). There was a trend toward more MS offspring attaining health-related educations (OR 1.10; 95 % CI 1.00-1.21; p = 0.06). In conclusion, children of MS parents showed a small advantage in grade point average in final examinations in basic school, and they more often tended toward health-related educations. This study revealed no negative consequences of parental MS on grades and highest educational level achieved.
PubMed ID
27541043 View in PubMed
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Evaluating the use and limitations of the Danish National Patient Register in register-based research using an example of multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133486
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2012 Mar;125(3):213-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
K. Mason
L C Thygesen
E. Stenager
H. Brønnum-Hansen
N. Koch-Henriksen
Author Affiliation
The University of Manchester, UK.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2012 Mar;125(3):213-7
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospital Departments - standards - utilization
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Neurology - standards
Registries - standards
Abstract
The Danish National Patient Register, Landspatientregistret (LPR), is a register of all hospital discharges and outpatient treatments in Denmark.
It is increasingly used in research so it is important to understand to what extent this can be used as an accurate source of information. Virtually all patients in Denmark with multiple sclerosis (MS) are reported to the Combined MS Registry (DMSR), so this was used as the standard which the LPR was compared against.
All residents of Denmark are assigned a unique Civil Register (CPR) number; this was used to compare data between registers. The LPR completeness was estimated by the proportion of cases from the DMSR that could be retrieved from the LPR. The LPR validity was estimated by the proportion of cases, listed in the LPR and DMSR, in whom the MS diagnosis could be confirmed as definite/probable/possible by the DMSR.
We found that 86.9% of those who were DMSR listed with an approved MS diagnosis were also listed in the LPR with a MS diagnosis. The diagnosis was valid in 96.3% of patients listed in the LPR when compared against the DMSR.
The low completeness reduces the usefulness of the LPR in epidemiological MS research, in particular incidence studies. The study also found that the completeness of the LPR could be increased to 92.8% by including LPR records from other departments in addition, but this reduced the validity of the LPR to 95.1%. However, these results cannot uncritically be applied to registration of other diseases in the LPR.
PubMed ID
21699500 View in PubMed
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High readmission rate after heart valve surgery: A nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272062
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015;189:96-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
K L Sibilitz
S K Berg
L C Thygesen
T B Hansen
L. Køber
C. Hassager
A-D Zwisler
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015;189:96-104
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Valve Diseases - mortality - surgery - ultrasonography
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - methods - mortality
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk assessment
Self Report
Sickness Impact Profile
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
After heart valve surgery, knowledge on long-term self-reported health status and readmission is lacking. Thus, the optimal strategy for out-patient management after surgery remains unclear.
Using a nationwide survey with linkage to Danish registers with one year follow-up, we included all adults 6-12 months after heart valve surgery irrespective of valve procedure, during Jan-June 2011 (n = 867). Participants completed a questionnaire regarding health-status (n = 742), and answers were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Readmission rates and mortality were investigated.
After valve surgery, the self-reported health was lower (Short Form-36 (SF-36) Physical Component Scale (PCS): 44.5 vs. 50.6 and Mental Component Scale (MCS): 51.9 vs. 55.0, p
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 1;202:79626476031
PubMed ID
25889437 View in PubMed
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Increased 30-day mortality in patients with diabetes undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277216
Source
Colorectal Dis. 2016 Jan;18(1):O22-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
T. Fransgaard
L C Thygesen
I. Gögenur
Source
Colorectal Dis. 2016 Jan;18(1):O22-9
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - surgery
Comorbidity
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Metformin - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Mortality
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Abstract
The primary aim of the study was to determine whether preexisting diabetes is associated with increased 30-day mortality after curative resection of colorectal cancer (CRC). The association between antidiabetic treatment and 30-day mortality was also examined.
Patients diagnosed with CRC between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2012 were identified through the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group National Clinical Database (DCCG). The Danish National Patient Register (NPR) collated all hospital contacts in Denmark and the diagnosis of diabetes was identified by combining NPR data with the use of antidiabetic drugs identified through the Danish National Prescription Registry and DCCG. The 30-day mortality was examined by the Kaplan-Meier method with the log-rank test and the Cox regression model used to test statistical significance.
The study included 29 353 patients, of whom 3250 had preexisting diabetes. The 30-day mortality was significantly increased in patients with CRC and preexisting diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.35, P = 0.03). The type of antidiabetic medication used was not associated with 30-day mortality.
Preexisting diabetes was associated with a higher short-term mortality in patients with CRC. No association between the type of antidiabetic medication and short-term mortality could be shown.
PubMed ID
26467438 View in PubMed
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