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[Data from different Moscow polyclinics on the utilization of vaccination against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, and measles in children of first 3 years of life].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242990
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1982 Aug;(8):112-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1982
Author
N L Sukhorukova
M P Korzhenkova
L A Sigaeva
T M Zybina
N M Maksimova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1982 Aug;(8):112-6
Date
Aug-1982
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Diphtheria - prevention & control
Diphtheria Toxoid - administration & dosage
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Infant
Measles - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Moscow
Pertussis Vaccine - administration & dosage
Tetanus - prevention & control
Tetanus Toxoid - administration & dosage
Vaccination - utilization
Whooping Cough - prevention & control
Abstract
The coverage of children by immunization against diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus during the first 3 years of life as indicated in forms No. 112 and No. 63 in 4 districts of Moscow was studied on the basis of the analysis of 1688 children's development histories. The coverage of children by immunization was found to be on the average 71.7%, fluctuating in individual districts from 58.6% to 85.9%. Immunization against measles covered 41.8% of children with fluctuations 24.2-51.2%. The most frequent reasons for the absence of prophylactic immunization in children during the first 3 years of life, or belated immunization in comparison with the specified terms, were contraindications due to neurological diseases (40.4%), exudative diathesis (15.9%) and recurrent viral infections (16.2%). Medical objections to immunization without sufficient grounds constituted 12.1% of all contraindications; among such objections those given by neuropathologists (9.8%) and pediatricians (2.3%) prevailed. To increase the coverage of children by immunization in the specified terms, the use of such measures as improving work with parents (explaining to them the importance of timely prophylactic immunization) and strict observance of instructions on medical contraindications may be considered most effective.
PubMed ID
7180259 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiological evaluation of the effectiveness of the obligatory isolation of whooping cough patients in schools].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251017
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1976 Jun;(6):108-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1976
Author
E A Okinshevich
L A Sigaeva
L S Kuznetsova
M K Naumova
M S Petrova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1976 Jun;(6):108-11
Date
Jun-1976
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Moscow
Pertussis Vaccine - administration & dosage
Quarantine
School Health Services
Whooping Cough - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
Analysis of observations carried out under practical conditions (165 patients with pertussis from 48 foci) and the results of controlled epidemiological trial on the discontinuance of compulsory isolation of pertussis patients at schools (12 classes, 402 children) showed that isolation of the patients failed to stop the spread of infection in the focus. This was attributed to incomplete detection of the patients and their late isolation in conditions of wide incidence of mild forms and formes frustes of pertussis. When patients suffering from pertussis were left at school, there occurred no increase in the spread of the infection in the focus, in duration or severity of the disease and no increase of the period of discharge of the causative agent. However, the number of days of the patient's absence from school was greatly reduced. Taking into consideration the absence of an attack-like cough in patients with formes frustes, short duration and preponderance of the attacks at night in patients with a mild form of pertussis, no disturbances in the general condition of the child, and also no indications to the treatment, schoolchildren should be isolated by clinical indications only (pyrexia, marked catarrhal phenomena, frequent attack-like cough, complications, concomitant diseases); they can be admitted to school as soon as the mentioned signs subsided irrespective of the time lapse from the onset of the disease.
PubMed ID
948948 View in PubMed
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[Intensity of the epidemic process of whooping cough under conditions of mass immunization over a period of many years].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249627
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1977 Sep;(9):20-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1977
Author
L S Kuznetsova
L A Sigaeva
A M Kondrat'eva
E A Okinshevich
N D Vinnichek
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1977 Sep;(9):20-7
Date
Sep-1977
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Immunity, Active
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Moscow
Time Factors
Vaccination
Whooping Cough - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Abstract
On the basis of analysis of whooping cough incidence in 1959 to 1975 in Moscow the authors present characteristics of the epidemic process under conditions of planned many-year immunization of children against this infection. Whooping cough morbidity proved to undergo significant changes-from sharp falls the first 8 years of immunization to a relative stabilization with a gradual reduction the last 5 years. Marked seasonal and periodic elevations persist against the background of reduction of morbidity. Preschool- and schoolchildren are equally involved in the epidemic process; the most frequently involved are nonvaccinated children aged 1 year and 4 to 10 years, which lost postvaccinal immunity. Further reduction of the severity of whooping cough and increase in the number of unimanifested forms of the infection was noted. This was apparently connected not only with immunization, but also with the reduction of the virulence of H. pertusis detected in studying the cultures isolated in Moscow from 1967 to 1974. The intensity indices of the epidemic process in whooping cough pointed to the necessity of using a more effective vaccine for the protection of children from whooping cough, despite the noted reduction of morbidity, and diminished severity of the course of the disease, and of the causative agent virulence.
PubMed ID
596020 View in PubMed
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[Role of adenoviruses in the development of group infections in children].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256025
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1971 Nov;48(11):140-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1971

[Whooping cough morbidity and inoculation status].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237352
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1986 Mar;(3):43-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1986
Author
L A Sigaeva
L S Kuznetsova
E A Okinshevich
I M Tymchakovskaia
N V Sirotina
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1986 Mar;(3):43-8
Date
Mar-1986
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Immunization
Immunization, Secondary
Pertussis Vaccine - immunology
Russia
Seasons
Urban Population
Whooping Cough - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The analysis of pertussis morbidity and the state of immunity to pertussis has made it possible to evaluate the existing epidemiological situation as unfavorable. The restraining influence of specific prophylaxis on the epidemic process of pertussis becomes weaker due to the growing number of nonimmunized children; for this reason, the maximum morbidity rate in pertussis is observed among children under 5 years of age, as it was at the period before the introduction of mass immunization against pertussis. To prevent further possible increase in the intensity of the epidemic process of pertussis and in the severity of the clinical course of the disease, the number of children under 3 years of age, not immunized against pertussis, must be reduced by limiting the number of children exempted from immunization on medical grounds and by increasing the proportion of children immunized from the age of 3 months.
PubMed ID
2939667 View in PubMed
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