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Association of Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference With Physical Functioning: The Vitality 90+ Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265788
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 Jul;70(7):885-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Inna Lisko
Sari Stenholm
Jani Raitanen
Mikko Hurme
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Kristina Tiainen
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 Jul;70(7):885-91
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise Tolerance - physiology
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - physiopathology
Residence Characteristics
Self Report
Thinness - complications - physiopathology
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Both obesity and underweight are associated with impaired physical functioning, but related information on the oldest old population is scarce. Our purpose was to examine whether body mass index, waist circumference (WC), and their combination are associated with physical performance and activities of daily living (ADL) disability in 90-year-old women and men.
Data are from the Vitality 90+ Study, which is a population-based study of persons with age =90 years living in the area of Tampere, Finland. Altogether 416 women and 153 men, aged 90-91 years, provided data on body mass index, WC, chair stand, and Barthel Index. Comorbidity, physical exercise, smoking history, living residence, and sample year were used as covariates in multinomial logistic and logistic regression models.
Women in the highest WC tertile had lower physical performance and were more likely unable to perform the chair stand than women in the lowest WC tertile. Women in the highest WC tertile were also more likely to have ADL disability, compared to the lowest WC tertile. In women, overweight and obesity were associated with ADL disability, but not when WC was included in the model. Men with body mass index =25 kg/m(2) and WC
PubMed ID
25394617 View in PubMed
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Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference as Predictors of Disability in Nonagenarians: The Vitality 90+ Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286877
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Oct 12;72(11):1569-1574
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-12-2017
Author
Inna Lisko
Kristina Tiainen
Jani Raitanen
Juulia Jylhävä
Mikko Hurme
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Sari Stenholm
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Oct 12;72(11):1569-1574
Date
Oct-12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Only scarce data exist on the association between obesity and disability in the oldest old. The purpose of this prospective study is to examine if body mass index and waist circumference (WC) are associated with incident mobility and activities of daily living (ADL) disability in nonagenarians.
We used longitudinal data from the Vitality 90+ Study, which is a population-based study conducted at the area of Tampere, Finland. Altogether 291 women and 134 men, aged 90-91 years, had measured data on body mass index and/or WC and did not have self-reported mobility or ADL disability at baseline. Incident mobility and ADL disability was followed-up on median 3.6 years (range 0.6-7.8 years). Mortality was also followed-up. Multinomial logistic regression models were used for the analyses, as death was treated as an alternative outcome. The follow-up time was taken into account in the analyses.
Neither low or high body mass index, nor low or high WC, were associated with incident mobility disability. In women, the lowest WC tertile (
PubMed ID
28329171 View in PubMed
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Body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio as predictors of mortality in nonagenarians: the Vitality 90+ Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131940
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2011 Nov;66(11):1244-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Inna Lisko
Kristina Tiainen
Sari Stenholm
Tiina Luukkaala
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland. inna.lisko@uta.fi
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2011 Nov;66(11):1244-50
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Body Composition
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Size - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Male
Nutritional Status
Obesity - mortality
Obesity, Abdominal - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The associations of body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity with mortality among very old people are poorly known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of BMI, waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio with mortality in nonagenarians.
This study is part of a prospective population-based study, Vitality 90+, including both community-dwelling and institutionalized persons from Tampere, Finland. Altogether 192 women and 65 men aged 90 years were subjected to anthropometric measurements, a baseline interview, and a 4-year mortality follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models were used in the statistical analyses.
In men, normal weight indicated a three times higher mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR] 3.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-7.06) compared with overweight, and WC was inversely associated with mortality (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-1.00) after adjustment for covariates. In women, the univariate waist-to-hip ratio (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.06-1.92) and BMI-adjusted waist-to-hip ratio (HR 1.45, 95% CI 1.07-1.97) were positively associated with mortality. Also, overweight women whose WC was
PubMed ID
21860016 View in PubMed
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Inflammation, adiposity, and mortality in the oldest old.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120475
Source
Rejuvenation Res. 2012 Oct;15(5):445-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Inna Lisko
Kristina Tiainen
Sari Stenholm
Tiina Luukkaala
Mikko Hurme
Terho Lehtimäki
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland. inna.lisko@uta.fi
Source
Rejuvenation Res. 2012 Oct;15(5):445-52
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - metabolism
Adiposity
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Body Composition
Body mass index
Female
Finland
Humans
Inflammation - metabolism
Linear Models
Male
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Increased proinflammatory status is associated with both increased adiposity and higher mortality risk. Thus, it is paradoxical that mild obesity does not predict increased mortality in older adults. We investigated the association of inflammatory markers with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) in nonagenarians, and the combined effects of BMI, WC, WHR, and inflammatory status on mortality.
This study was based on a prospective population-based study, Vitality 90+, carried out in Tampere, Finland. Altogether, 157 women and 53 men aged 90 years were subjected to anthropometric measurements, blood samples, and a 4-year mortality follow-up. Inflammatory status was based on sex-specific median levels of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a).
In the unadjusted linear regression analyses, IL-1RA, CRP, and TNF-a were positively associated with BMI and WC in women, whereas in men IL-1RA was positively associated with BMI and IL-6 positively with WC. In the models adjusted for diseases, functional status, and smoking, IL-1RA and CRP were positively associated with BMI and WC in women. Low WC and WHR combined with low inflammation protected from mortality in women and high BMI and WC regardless of inflammation protected from mortality in men in the adjusted Cox regression analysis.
In the oldest old, the effect of adiposity in combination with inflammatory status on mortality differs between men and women. More research is needed to disentangle the role of adiposity among the oldest old.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22998329 View in PubMed
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Long-term determinants of muscle strength decline: prospective evidence from the 22-year mini-Finland follow-up survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128285
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jan;60(1):77-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Sari Stenholm
Kristina Tiainen
Taina Rantanen
Päivi Sainio
Markku Heliövaara
Olli Impivaara
Seppo Koskinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Functional Capacity and Welfare, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku and Helsinki, Finland. sari.stenholm@thl.fi
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jan;60(1):77-85
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aging - physiology
Disease Progression
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Hand Strength - physiology
Health Surveys - methods
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle Strength Dynamometer
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sarcopenia - epidemiology - physiopathology
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine long-term changes in handgrip strength and the factors predicting handgrip strength decline.
Longitudinal cohort study with 22 years of follow-up.
Population-based Mini-Finland Health Examination Survey in Finland.
Nine hundred sixty-three men and women aged 30 to 73 at baseline.
Handgrip strength was measured using a handheld dynamometer at baseline and follow-up. Information on potential risk factors, namely lifestyle and chronic conditions, and their changes throughout the follow-up were based on health interviews.
Based on linear mixed-effect models, midlife physically strenuous work, excess body weight, smoking, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and asthma predicted muscle strength decline over 22 years of follow-up (P 
PubMed ID
22211568 View in PubMed
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Predictors of mortality in men and women aged 90 and older: a nine-year follow-up study in the Vitality 90+ study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115624
Source
Age Ageing. 2013 Jul;42(4):468-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Kristina Tiainen
Tiina Luukkaala
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center and School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland. kristina.tiainen@uta.fi
Source
Age Ageing. 2013 Jul;42(4):468-75
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cause of Death
Comorbidity
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Mobility Limitation
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
information about the predictors of mortality among the oldest-old is limited. Also possible gender differences are poorly known.
to examine the predictors of mortality among individuals aged 90 and older, focusing on differences between men and women. We also analysed gender differences in survival at different levels of mobility and activities in daily living (ADL).
this 9-year follow-up study is part of the Vitality 90+ study, a population-based study of people aged 90 and older.
all inhabitants aged 90 and older in the area of Tampere, Finland were contacted, irrespective of health or dwelling place. The study population consisted of 171 men and 717 women.
data were collected with a mailed questionnaire asking questions concerning ADL and mobility, self-rated health, chronic conditions and socio-economic factors. The participation rate was 79%. Cox regression enter models were used for the analysis.
older age, male gender, disability in ADL and mobility, poor self-rated health and institutionalisation increased the risk of mortality in the total study group. In age-adjusted Cox regression models, ADL and mobility were stronger predictors in men than in women (gender interactions, P
PubMed ID
23486170 View in PubMed
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Shared genetic and environmental effects on strength and power in older female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176744
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Jan;37(1):72-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Kristina Tiainen
Sarianna Sipilä
Markku Alén
Eino Heikkinen
Jaakko Kaprio
Markku Koskenvuo
Asko Tolvanen
Satu Pajala
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
The Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35(Viveca), Fin-40014 University of Jyväskylä, Finland. tiainen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Jan;37(1):72-8
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Knee - physiology
Lower Extremity - physiology
Middle Aged
Muscles - physiology
Twins - physiology
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
This study examined the relative contribution of genetic and environmental effects on maximal leg extensor power and also investigated whether leg extensor power and maximum voluntary isometric knee extensor strength share a genetic component.
Muscle functions were measured as part of the Finnish Twin Study on Aging in 101 monozygotic (MZ) and 116 dizygotic (DZ) female twin pairs aged 63-76 yr. Leg extensor power was measured using the Nottingham Leg Extensor Power Rig and maximum voluntary isometric knee extensor strength using an adjustable dynamometer chair. The analyses were carried out using the maximum likelihood method in Mx-program on the raw data set.
A bivariate Cholesky decomposition model showed that leg extensor power and isometric knee extensor strength shared a genetic component in common, which accounted for 32% of the total variance in leg extensor power and 48% in isometric knee extensor strength. In addition, power and strength had a nonshared environmental effect in common accounting for four percent of the variance in power and 52% in strength. Remaining variance for leg extensor power was due to trait-specific shared and nonshared environmental effects.
Observed genetic effect in common for leg extensor power and maximum voluntary isometric knee extensor strength indicated that these two traits are regulated by the same genes. However, also environmental effects have a significant role in explaining the variability in power and strength.
PubMed ID
15632671 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.