Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

A 10-year follow-up of a population-based study of people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm, Sweden: changes in disability and the value of different factors in predicting disability and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108382
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2013 Sep 15;332(1-2):121-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2013
Author
Charlotte Chruzander
Sverker Johansson
Kristina Gottberg
Ulrika Einarsson
Sten Fredrikson
Lotta Widén Holmqvist
Charlotte Ytterberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Huddinge, Sweden. charlotte.chruzander@ki.se
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2013 Sep 15;332(1-2):121-7
Date
Sep-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Community Health Planning
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Walking - physiology
Abstract
Most people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) experience progressively worsening disability over a period of decades, thus further knowledge about the long-term changes in different areas of disability is essential.
The aims of this study were to evaluate changes in disability over ten years in PwMS, and to explore the value of personal and disease-specific factors and depressive symptoms in predicting disability. A further aim was to explore the value of these factors as predictors of mortality.
This study was based on a 10-year follow-up of a population-based study in Stockholm (n=166). Home visits were used to collect data on personal and disease-specific factors, walking ability, manual dexterity, cognitive function, mood, activities of daily living (ADL) and social/lifestyle activities.
The proportion of the study population who had disability in cognition, mood and social/lifestyle activities remained stable, while the proportion with disability in walking, manual dexterity and ADL increased. Disease severity predicted an increase in all studied variables of disability except in depressive symptoms. Older age and depressive symptoms were associated with mortality.
This study illustrates the importance of tailored interventions for PwMS and highlights the need for health-care professionals to consider the psychological aspects of the disease. Furthermore, our results indicate that the Expanded Disability Status Scale was a useful tool for predicting future disability.
PubMed ID
23896259 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-year follow-up of a population-based study of people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm, Sweden: changes in health-related quality of life and the value of different factors in predicting health-related quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259017
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2014 Apr 15;339(1-2):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2014
Author
Charlotte Chruzander
Charlotte Ytterberg
Kristina Gottberg
Ulrika Einarsson
Lotta Widén Holmqvist
Sverker Johansson
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2014 Apr 15;339(1-2):57-63
Date
Apr-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Population Surveillance - methods
Predictive value of tests
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Health-related quality of life (HRQL) in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) is negatively affected compared to that of the general population. Cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms have been shown to predict worse HRQL in a short-term perspective. Considering the progressive nature of MS, it is essential to include the long-term (10 years) perspective of HRQL in PwMS.
The aim of this 10-year follow-up of a population-based sample of PwMS was to explore changes in and the predictive value of personal factors, degree of MS disability, depressive symptoms and cognitive impairment on HRQL.
Data on personal and disease-specific factors, mood, and cognitive function was collected. Data on HRQL was collected, seen as a health profile with the Sickness Impact Profile, as a health index with the EuroQol 5D and as a single global question with the EQ Visual Analog Scale.
HRQL worsened over 10 years according to the health profile (Sickness Impact Profile Total and its physical dimension) and according to the health index. The effect sizes were small. HRQL assessed with the single global question remained unchanged. Depressive symptoms and cognitive impairment predicted worse HRQL.
In a 10-year perspective the HRQL with regard to its physical domain or when seen as a total health profile tends to get worse in PwMS. Yet, HRQL with regard to its psychosocial domain and with regard to PwMS' self-rated health, remains stable. There is a potential for health-care professionals to decrease the impact of modifiable factors on HRQL in PwMS by identifying those with depressive symptoms and/or cognitive impairment and initiating evidence-based treatment as well as meeting the need for environmental facilitators aiming at reducing disability.
PubMed ID
24492009 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-year population-based study of people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm, Sweden: use of and satisfaction with care and the value of different factors in predicting use of care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275585
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015;15:480
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Charlotte Chruzander
Sverker Johansson
Kristina Gottberg
Ulrika Einarsson
Jan Hillert
Lotta Widén Holmqvist
Charlotte Ytterberg
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015;15:480
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - utilization
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The national strategy for treatment of chronic diseases - including MS - and changes in the Swedish welfare system, call for analyses of the use of, and patient satisfaction with, care in a long-term perspective. The aim was therefore to explore the use of care and the predictive value of personal factors, disease-specific factors and functioning on the use of care and to explore patient satisfaction with care in a 10-year perspective.
Information regarding personal factors, disease-specific factors, functioning and satisfaction with care was collected by home-visits; use of care was collected from the Stockholm County Council computerised register.
Data from 121 people with MS (PwMS) was collected. Primary care accounted for the majority of all care. Neurology and Rehabilitation Departments together accounted for two-thirds of all hospital outpatient care. Rehabilitation Departments accounted for one-third of the total number of inpatient days. Lower coping capacity, impaired manual dexterity and activity of daily living dependency at baseline, together with progress in MS disability predicted a higher use of care. Overall, patient satisfaction with care was stable over time.
The extensive use of care offers challenges to care coordination. Implementation of person-centred care could be a strategy to increase efficacy/outcome of care.
Notes
Cites: J Neurol Sci. 2014 Apr 15;339(1-2):57-6324492009
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2000 Aug;81(8):1034-810943751
Cites: Scand J Rehabil Med. 2000 Dec;32(4):173-911201624
Cites: Med Care. 1978 Apr;16(4):327-36651398
Cites: Neurology. 1983 Nov;33(11):1444-526685237
Cites: Int Rehabil Med. 1985;7(4):176-814093249
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1987 Jun;50(6):714-93612152
Cites: Scand J Rehabil Med. 1991;23(4):193-2021785028
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1993 Mar;36(6):725-338480217
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 1993;7(1):3-108502852
Cites: Neurology. 1996 Apr;46(4):907-118780061
Cites: J Pers Assess. 1996 Dec;67(3):588-978991972
Cites: Neurology. 1998 Jun;50(6):1594-6009633699
Cites: Md State Med J. 1965 Feb;14:61-514258950
Cites: Mult Scler. 2005 Jun;11(3):328-3715957516
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2006;(1):CD00443116437487
Cites: Mult Scler. 2006 Jun;12(3):340-5316764349
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2006 Jul;38(4):230-616801205
Cites: Eur J Health Econ. 2006 Sep;7 Suppl 2:S75-8517310342
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2007 Apr;58(1):11-2217394612
Cites: BMC Neurol. 2008;8:3618823543
Cites: Pharmacoeconomics. 2008;26(10):847-6018793032
Cites: Can J Neurol Sci. 2007 May;34(2):167-7417598593
Cites: J Neurol. 2008 Sep;255(9):1354-6018677639
Cites: Mult Scler. 2009 Jan;15(1):88-9518701570
Cites: Brain. 2009 May;132(Pt 5):1175-8919339255
Cites: J Manag Care Pharm. 2010 Nov-Dec;16(9):703-1221067256
Cites: J Neurol Sci. 2013 Sep 15;332(1-2):121-723896259
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:36524074396
Cites: J Neurol Sci. 2013 Dec 15;335(1-2):42-724183855
Cites: J Med Philos. 2008 Jun;33(3):241-6118567905
Cites: Mult Scler. 2008 Aug;14(7):962-7118573818
PubMed ID
26499940 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health-related quality of life in partners of persons with MS: a longitudinal 10-year perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264807
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(12):e006097
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kristina Gottberg
C. Chruzander
U. Einarsson
S. Fredrikson
S. Johansson
L. Widén Holmqvist
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(12):e006097
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Depression - etiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Spouses - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS) impacts the health-related quality of life (HRQL) in partners, but knowledge on the longitudinal perspective is needed. The aim was to analyse HRQL in partners of persons with MS living in Sweden a decade ago and after 10 years.
Partners were identified through a population-based study of persons with MS in Stockholm. Information on HRQL (the Sickness Impact profile), personal factors and disease-specific factors, and measures of functioning of persons with MS was collected at both time points mainly by home visits.
Some 64 of 102 identified partners (63%) agreed to participate at baseline, and at 10 years 40 of 54 eligible partners were included (74%). HRQL in partners was worse than in a Swedish, aged-grouped reference population at both baseline and follow-up. Depressive symptoms in persons with MS were independently associated with worse HRQL in partners.
Depressive symptoms in persons with MS were associated with worse HRQL in their partners, and HRQL of partners was continuously impacted in the longitudinal perspective. This knowledge needs to be accounted for in the planning of MS care, together with the development of evidence-based support for depressive symptoms, and engagement in recreational life in both partners and persons with MS.
Notes
Cites: J Neurosci Nurs. 2008 Oct;40(5):304-1118856252
Cites: Mult Scler. 2009 Jan;15(1):88-9518701570
Cites: J Neurosci Nurs. 2010 Dec;42(6):331-4121207771
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2011 Jun;20(5):703-1121127997
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011;(10):CD00817921975778
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(1):53-6121957864
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 2012 Mar;125(3):171-921470195
Cites: Psychol Health. 2012;27(3):324-4621678171
Cites: Eur J Neurol. 2012 Jun;19(6):847-5422233289
Cites: J Neurol Sci. 2013 Sep 15;332(1-2):121-723896259
Cites: Mult Scler. 2008 Aug;14(7):962-7118573818
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2007 Oct;78(10):1097-10217237144
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007;(2):CD00603617443610
Cites: Mult Scler. 2007 Mar;13(2):238-4917439890
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2007 Jan;78(1):60-516847048
Cites: Mult Scler. 2006 Oct;12(5):605-1217086907
Cites: Mult Scler. 2006 Jun;12(3):340-5316764349
Cites: J Neurol Sci. 2006 Apr 15;243(1-2):13-2016380136
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1961 Jun;4:561-7113688369
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1999 Jun;48(11):1507-1510400253
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 1998 Feb;12(1):30-59549023
Cites: Ann Neurol. 1997 Sep;42(3):379-829307263
Cites: Neurology. 1997 Jan;48(1):74-809008497
Cites: J Rehabil Res Dev. 1993;30(2):210-238035350
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 1993;7(1):3-108502852
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1993 Mar;36(6):725-338480217
Cites: Scand J Rehabil Med. 1989;21(4):171-72631192
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2004 Sep;47(5):475-8215312110
Cites: Int Rehabil Med. 1985;7(4):176-814093249
Cites: Neurology. 1983 Nov;33(11):1444-526685237
Cites: Med Care. 1981 Aug;19(8):787-8057278416
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:14220507600
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2000 Aug;81(8):1034-810943751
Cites: Scand J Rheumatol. 1986;15(2):193-2003489290
PubMed ID
25515842 View in PubMed
Less detail

The relationship between walking, manual dexterity, cognition and activity/participation in persons with multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130640
Source
Mult Scler. 2012 May;18(5):639-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Marie Kierkegaard
Ulrika Einarsson
Kristina Gottberg
Lena von Koch
Lotta Widén Holmqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. marie.kierkegaard@karolinska.se
Source
Mult Scler. 2012 May;18(5):639-46
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Cognition
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise Test
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Skills
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Neuropsychological Tests
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Social Participation
Sweden
Walking
Young Adult
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis has a vast impact on health, but the relationship between walking, manual dexterity, cognition and activity/participation is unclear.
The specific aims were to explore the discriminative ability of measures of walking, manual dexterity and cognition, and to identify cut-off values in these measures, for prediction of independence in personal and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL) and activity/participation in social and lifestyle activities.
Data from 164 persons with multiple sclerosis were collected during home visits with the following measures: the 2 × 5 m walk test, the Nine-hole Peg Test, the Symbol Digit Modalities Test, the Katz Personal and Instrumental ADL Indexes, and the Frenchay Activities Index (measuring frequency in social and lifestyle activities).
The 2 × 5 m walk test and the Nine-hole Peg Test had high and better discriminative and predictive ability than the Symbol Digit Modalities Test. Cut-off values were identified. The accuracy of predictions was increased above all by combining the 2 × 5 m walk test and the Nine-hole Peg Test.
The proposed cut-off values in the 2 × 5 m walk test and the Nine-hole Peg Test may be used as indicators of functioning and to identify persons risking activity limitations and participation restrictions. However, further studies are needed to confirm the usefulness in clinical practice.
PubMed ID
21982871 View in PubMed
Less detail