Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Alcohol consumption, types of alcoholic beverages and risk of venous thromboembolism - the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134175
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2011 Aug;106(2):272-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Ida J Hansen-Krone
Sigrid K Brækkan
Kristin F Enga
Tom Wilsgaard
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hematological research group in Tromsø (HERG), Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. ida.j.hansen-krone@uit.no
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2011 Aug;106(2):272-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Beer
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - etiology - prevention & control
Wine
Abstract
Moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to protect against cardiovascular diseases. The association between alcohol consumption, especially types of alcoholic beverages, and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is less well described. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of alcohol consumption and different alcoholic beverages on risk of VTE. Information on alcohol consumption was collected by a self-administrated questionnaire in 26,662 subjects, aged 25-97 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study, in 1994-1995. Subjects were followed through September 1, 2007 with incident VTE as the primary outcome. There were 460 incident VTE-events during a median of 12.5 years of follow-up. Total alcohol consumption was not associated with risk of incident VTE. However, subjects consuming = 3 units of liquor per week had 53% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotalers in analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, cancer, previous cardiovascular disease, physical activity and higher education (HR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.00-2.33). Contrary, subjects with a wine intake of = 3 units/week had 22% reduced risk of VTE (HR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.47-1.30), further adjustment for liquor and beer intake strengthened the protective effect of wine (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.30-1.00). Frequent binge drinkers (= 1/week) had a 17% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotallers (HR 1.17, 95% CI: 0.66-2.09), and a 47% increased risk compared to non-binge drinkers (HR 1.47, 95% CI: 0.85-2.54). In conclusion, liquor consumption and binge drinking was associated with increased risk of VTE, whereas wine consumption was possibly associated with reduced risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
21614415 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atrial fibrillation and future risk of venous thromboembolism - the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257483
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2014 Oct 21;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-2014
Author
Kristin F Enga
Ina Rye-Holmboe
Erin M Hald
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Tom Wilsgaard
Sigrid K Braekkan
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
K.G. Jebsen Thrombosis Research and Expertise Center, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway; Hematological Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2014 Oct 21;
Date
Oct-21-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Whether atrial fibrillation is related to risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is not extensively studied. Therefore, we investigated the association between atrial fibrillation and future risk of VTE in a population-based cohort.
In total, 29 975 subjects were recruited from three surveys of the Tromsø study and followed from enrolment (1994-95, 2001-02 and 2007-08) through 2010. Incident events of atrial fibrillation and VTE during follow-up were recorded. Information on potential confounders was obtained at baseline. Cox-regression models with atrial fibrillation as time-dependent variable were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for VTE with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
During 16 years of median follow-up, 1604 subjects were diagnosed with atrial fibrillation and 614 with incident VTE. The risk of VTE was substantially increased during the first 6 months after diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (HR 8.44, 95% CI: 5.61-12.69), and remained increased throughout the study period (HR: 1.43, 95% CI 1.43-1.99) compared to those without atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation displayed higher risk estimates for pulmonary embolism (HR: 11.84, 6.80-20.63) than for deep vein thrombosis (HR: 6.20, 3.37-11.39), during the first 6 months, and was still associated with pulmonary embolism (HR: 1.96, 95% CI: 1.24-3.10) but not with deep vein thrombosis (HR: 1.08, 95% CI: 0.66-1.75) more than 6 months after diagnosis.
Atrial fibrillation was associated with increased risk of VTE, and pulmonary embolism in particular. Our findings support the concept that isolated pulmonary embolism may originate from right atrial thrombi due to atrial fibrillation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
PubMed ID
25330989 View in PubMed
Less detail

Emotional states and future risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127168
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2012 Mar;107(3):485-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Kristin F Enga
Sigrid K Brækkan
Ida J Hansen-Krone
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hematological Research Group (HERG), Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. kristin.f.enga@uit.no
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2012 Mar;107(3):485-93
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depression - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Emotions - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Abstract
Emotional states of depression and loneliness are reported to be associated with higher risk and optimism with lower risk of arterial cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death. The relation between emotional states and risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been explored previously. We aimed to investigate the associations between self-reported emotional states and risk of incident VTE in a population-based, prospective study. The frequency of feeling depressed, lonely and happy/optimistic were registered by self-administered questionnaires, along with major co-morbidities and lifestyle habits, in 25,964 subjects aged 25-96 years, enrolled in the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995. Incident VTE-events were registered from the date of inclusion until September 1, 2007. There were 440 incident VTE-events during a median of 12.4 years of follow-up. Subjects who often felt depressed had 1.6-fold (95% CI:1.02-2.50) higher risk of VTE compared to those not depressed in analyses adjusted for other risk factors (age, sex , body mass index, oestrogens), lifestyle (smoking, alcohol consumption, educational level) and co-morbidities (diabetes, CVD, and cancer). Often feeling lonely was not associated with VTE. However, the incidence rate of VTE in subjects who concurrently felt often lonely and depressed was higher than for depression alone (age-and sex-adjusted incidence rate: 3.27 vs. 2.21). Oppositely, subjects who often felt happy/optimistic had 40% reduced risk of VTE (HR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.41-0.87). Our findings suggest that self-reported emotional states are associated with risk of VTE. Depressive feelings were associated with increased risk, while happiness/optimism was associated with reduced risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
22318455 View in PubMed
Less detail

Family history of myocardial infarction and cause-specific risk of myocardial infarction and venous thromboembolism: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264896
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2014 Oct;7(5):684-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Caroline Lind
Kristin F Enga
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Sigrid K Brækkan
John-Bjarne Hansen
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2014 Oct;7(5):684-91
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atherosclerosis - diagnosis - genetics
Family Health
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - genetics
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - diagnosis - genetics
Abstract
A family history of myocardial infarction (FHMI) has been shown to increase the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The mechanism underlying the association remains unclear. Therefore, we aimed to determine the risks of MI and VTE by FHMI using a cause-specific model and to explore whether atherosclerotic risk factors could explain the association between FHMI and VTE in a population-based cohort.
The study included 21 624 subjects recruited from the Tromsø Study in 1994 to 1995 and 2001 to 2002. Incident MI and VTE events were registered from date of enrollment to end of follow-up, December 31, 2010. There were 1311 MIs and 428 VTEs during a median follow-up of 15.8 years. FHMI was associated with a 52% increased risk of MI (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-1.70) and a 26% increased risk of VTE (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.55) in the cause-specific Cox model. Similar results were found using the traditional Cox model. The risk estimates by status of FHMI were highest for unprovoked deep vein thrombosis (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-2.56), and the risk increased with increasing number of affected relatives. Modifiable atherosclerotic risk factors slightly altered the association between FHMI and MI but had a negligible effect on the association between FHMI and VTE.
FHMI was associated with increased risk of both MI and VTE in a cause-specific model. Apparently, the association between FHMI and VTE applied to unprovoked deep vein thrombosis and was not explained by modifiable atherosclerotic risk factors.
PubMed ID
25087051 View in PubMed
Less detail

Heart healthy diet and risk of myocardial infarction and venous thromboembolism. The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123041
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2012 Sep;108(3):554-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Ida J Hansen-Krone
Kristin F Enga
Inger Njølstad
John-Bjarne Hansen
Sigrid K Braekkan
Author Affiliation
Hematological Research Group, Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. ida.j.hansen-krone@uit.no
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2012 Sep;108(3):554-60
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Body mass index
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats
Dietary Fiber
Female
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Habits
Humans
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Milk
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk
Risk Reduction Behavior
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Vegetables
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Prudent dietary patterns are associated with reduced risk of arterial cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Limited data exist on the relation between diet and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The aim of our prospective, population based study was to investigate the association of a heart healthy diet on risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and VTE. Information on dietary habits was available in 18,062 subjects, aged 25-69, who participated in the fourth Tromsø study, 1994-1995. Dietary patterns were assessed by a slightly modified version of the validated SmartDiet score; a 13-item questionnaire producing a diet score based on the intakes of fat, fibre, fruit and vegetables. Incident events of MI (n=518) and VTE (n=172) were recorded to the end of follow-up December 31, 2005 (median follow-up 10.8 years). Cox-regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR). A healthy diet score of >27 points (upper tertile) was associated with 17% reduced risk of MI (HR: 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66-1.06), and no association with VTE (HR: 1.01; 95%CI: 0.66-1.56), compared to
PubMed ID
22739999 View in PubMed
Less detail

High fish plus fish oil intake is associated with slightly reduced risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104487
Source
J Nutr. 2014 Jun;144(6):861-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Ida J Hansen-Krone
Kristin F Enga
Julie M Südduth-Klinger
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Tom Wilsgaard
Steven Watkins
Sigrid K Brækkan
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hematological Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
J Nutr. 2014 Jun;144(6):861-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Body mass index
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Dietary Supplements
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Fish Oils - administration & dosage
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Current knowledge of the effect of fish consumption on risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is scarce and diverging. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of fish consumption and fish oil supplements on the risk of VTE in a population-based cohort. Weekly intake of fish for dinner and intake of fish oil supplements during the previous year were registered in 23,621 persons aged 25-97 y who participated in the Tromsø Study from 1994 to 1995. Incident VTE events were registered throughout follow-up (31 December 2010). Cox-regression models were used to calculate HRs for VTE, adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, physical activity, and education level. During a median of 15.8 y of follow-up there were 536 incident VTE events. High fish consumption was associated with a slightly reduced risk of VTE. Participants who ate fish =3 times/wk had 22% lower risk of VTE than those who consumed fish 1-1.9 times/wk (multivariable HR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.60, 1.01; P = 0.06). The addition of fish oil supplements strengthened the inverse association with risk of VTE. Participants who consumed fish =3 times/wk who additionally used fish oil supplements had 48% lower risk than those who consumed fish 1-1.9 times/wk but did not use fish oil supplements (HR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.79; P = 0.002). In conclusion, a high weekly intake (=3 times/wk) of fish was associated with a slightly reduced risk of VTE, and the addition of fish oil supplements strengthened the inverse effect.
PubMed ID
24744307 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of incident venous thromboembolism on risk of arterial thrombotic diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105991
Source
Circulation. 2014 Feb 25;129(8):855-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-25-2014
Author
Caroline Lind
Linda E Flinterman
Kristin F Enga
Marianne T Severinsen
Søren R Kristensen
Sigrid K Braekkan
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Suzanne C Cannegieter
Kim Overvad
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hematological Research Group (C.L., K.F.E., S.K.B., J.-B.H.), Brain and Circulation Research Group (E.B.M.), Department of Clinical Medicine, and Department of Community Medicine (I.N.), University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark (L.E.F., K.O.); Division of Internal Medicine (K.F.E., S.K.B., J.-B.H.) and Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology (E.B.M.), University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Haematology (M.T.S.) and Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Center (S.R.K.) and Department of Cardiology (K.O.), Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; and Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands (S.C.C.).
Source
Circulation. 2014 Feb 25;129(8):855-63
Date
Feb-25-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Stroke - epidemiology - mortality
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Growing evidence supports an association between venous thromboembolism (VTE) and arterial thrombotic diseases (ie, myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke). We aimed to study the association between VTE and future arterial events and to determine the population attributable risk of arterial events by VTE in a large prospective cohort recruited from the general population.
In 1994 to 1995 and 1993 to 1997, 81 687 subjects were included in the Tromsø Study and in the Diet, Cancer and Health Study and followed up to the date of incident venous and arterial events (myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke), death or migration, or to the end of the study period (2010 and 2008, respectively). There were 1208 cases of VTE and 90 subsequent arterial events during a median follow-up of 12.2 years. An association between VTE and future arterial events was found in all women and men aged 65 years. Women
PubMed ID
24270266 View in PubMed
Less detail

Venous thromboembolism increases the risk of atrial fibrillation: the Tromso study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105428
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2014;3(1):e000483
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Erin M Hald
Kristin F Enga
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Tom Wilsgaard
Sigrid K Braekkan
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hematological Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2014;3(1):e000483
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Venous Thromboembolism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Pulmonary embolism (PE) may trigger atrial fibrillation through increased right atrial pressure and subsequent atrial strain, but the degree of evidence is low. In this study, we wanted to investigate the impact of incident venous thromboembolism (VTE) on future risk of atrial fibrillation in a prospective population-based study.
The study included 29 974 subjects recruited from the Tromsø study (1994-1995, 2001-2002, 2007-2008). Incident VTE and atrial fibrillation events were registered from date of enrolment to end of follow-up, December 31, 2010. Cox proportional hazard regression models using age as time-scale and VTE as a time-dependent variable were used to estimate crude and multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) for atrial fibrillation with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During 16 years of follow up, 540 (1.8%) subjects had an incident VTE event, and 1662 (5.54%) were diagnosed with atrial fibrillation. Among those with VTE, 50 (9.3%) developed subsequent atrial fibrillation. Patients with VTE had 63% higher risk of atrial fibrillation compared to subjects without VTE (multivariable-adjusted HR: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.22 to 2.17). The risk of atrial fibrillation was particularly high during the first 6 months after the VTE event (HR 4.00, 95% CI: 2.21 to 7.25) and among those with PE (HR 1.78, 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.80).
We found that incident VTE was associated with future risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings support the hypothesis that PE may lead to cardiac dysfunctions that, in turn, could trigger atrial fibrillation.
Notes
Cites: J Interv Card Electrophysiol. 2000 Jun;4(2):369-8210936003
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2014 Apr;31(4):308-1223349355
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 Aug 9-23;164(15):1685-915302640
Cites: Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 1975 Jan-Feb;17(4):247-57123074
Cites: Clin Cardiol. 2004 Dec;27(12):693-715628112
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2005 May;25(5):843-815863641
Cites: Am Heart J. 2007 Jan;153(1):127-3217174650
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2007 Oct;28(20):2517-2417670755
Cites: Med Clin North Am. 2008 Jan;92(1):17-40, ix18060995
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2008 Sep;29(18):2276-31518757870
Cites: Chest. 2009 Nov;136(5):1202-1019542256
Cites: Med Princ Pract. 2010;19(2):16620134183
Cites: Am J Med. 2010 May;123(5):426-3120399319
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 May 15;171(10):1109-1520418276
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2010 Jul 9;142(2):e25-619135742
Cites: Respir Med. 2010 Sep;104(9):1370-620418082
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2010 Oct;31(19):2369-42920802247
Cites: J Card Fail. 2010 Oct;16(10):827-3420932465
Cites: J Thromb Haemost. 2012 Mar;10(3):347-5122212132
Cites: Lancet. 2012 May 12;379(9828):1835-4622494827
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;41(4):961-721422063
Cites: Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Oct;20(5):729-3622588086
Cites: Thromb Haemost. 2003 Dec;90(6):1158-6214652651
PubMed ID
24385452 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.