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Biobanks collected for routine healthcare purposes: build-up and use for epidemiologic research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140048
Source
Methods Mol Biol. 2011;675:113-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Joakim Dillner
Kristin Andersson
Author Affiliation
Bio Banking and Molecular Resource, Infrastructure of Sweden (BBMRIse), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Methods Mol Biol. 2011;675:113-25
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks - ethics
Epidemiologic Studies
Finland
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
The routine health services collect large amount of samples for biobanking, particularly in clinical laboratory medicine, mainly for clinical diagnostic purposes. These samples provide a large-scale and clinically relevant biobanking infrastructure that can be used for research if these conditions apply. There must be a system for database management that can obtain data on clinical endpoints, vital status, and additional required information via registry linkages. There must be an appropriate ethical system for handling consent for research use. There should be an active effort to optimize the usefulness of clinical biobanks also for research use. Major steps in this direction include measures to stop the ongoing discarding of old samples, reformatting to minimize pick-up times, external quality assurance and formal accreditation of biobanks, building of a dedicated high-quality database that is regularly used for registry linkages, and considerations on whether usefulness and accessibility for research can be optimized by extended saving or pre-treatment of samples. Systematic clinical biobanking could become a major asset for clinical research and public health if biobanking is considered as a routine part of everyday clinical practice, and the science of biobanking is considered an essential part of the science of laboratory medicine.
PubMed ID
20949385 View in PubMed
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Prospective seroepidemiologic study of human papillomavirus and other risk factors in cervical cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130529
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Dec;20(12):2541-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Lisen Arnheim Dahlström
Kristin Andersson
Tapio Luostarinen
Steinar Thoresen
Helga Ögmundsdottír
Laufey Tryggvadottír
Fredrik Wiklund
Gry B Skare
Carina Eklund
Kia Sjölin
Egil Jellum
Pentti Koskela
Göran Wadell
Matti Lehtinen
Joakim Dillner
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Dec;20(12):2541-50
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Human papillomavirus 16 - isolation & purification
Human papillomavirus 18 - isolation & purification
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - virology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - virology
Tumor Virus Infections - complications - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
Several sexually transmitted infections (STI) have been reported to interact with human papillomavirus (HPV) in the etiology of cervical cancer. A large cohort study is required to obtain a both unbiased and stable estimate of their effects.
Four major biobanks in the Nordic Countries containing samples from about 1,000,000 subjects were linked with nation-wide cancer registries. Serum samples from 604 women with invasive cervical cancer (ICC) diagnosed on average 10 years after sampling and 2,980 matched control women were retrieved and analyzed with serology for key STI.
Exposure to HPV16 was the strongest risk factor for cervical cancer [OR = 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.0-3.0], particularly for squamous cell carcinoma (OR = 2.9; 95% CI, 2.2-3.7). HPV18 was strongly associated with increased risk for adenocarcinoma (OR = 2.3; 95% CI, 1.3-4.1). Baseline seropositivity for HPV16 did not confer any increased risk for HPV18 DNA-positive cancer and conversely HPV18 seropositivity had no association with HPV16 DNA-positive cancers. HPV6 had no effect on its own (OR = 1.1; 95% CI, 0.9-1.3), but had an antagonistic effect on the risk conferred by HPV16 (P
PubMed ID
21994401 View in PubMed
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Prospective study of human papillomavirus seropositivity and risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126154
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Apr 1;175(7):685-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2012
Author
Kristin Andersson
Kristina M Michael
Tapio Luostarinen
Tim Waterboer
Randi Gislefoss
Timo Hakulinen
Ola Forslund
Michael Pawlita
Joakim Dillner
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Apr 1;175(7):685-95
Date
Apr-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Papillomaviridae
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been associated with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in case-control studies, but there are limited data from prospective studies assessing whether virus exposure predicts risk of future cancer development. Two major biobanks, the Southern Sweden Microbiology Biobank (1971-2003) and the Janus Biobank (1973-2003) in Norway, containing samples from 850,000 donors, were searched for incident skin cancer for up to 30 years using registry linkages. Altogether, 2,623 donors with samples taken before diagnosis of SCC or basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin were identified. Prediagnostic samples and samples from 2,623 matched controls were tested for antibodies against 33 types of HPV. Baseline seropositivity to HPV types in genus ß species 2 was associated with SCC risk (odds ratio = 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 1.7); this was also the case for samples taken more than 18 years before diagnosis (odds ratio = 1.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 2.8). Type-specific persistent seropositivity entailed elevated point estimates for SCC risk for 29 HPV types and decreased point estimates for only 3 types. After multiple hypothesis adjustment, HPV 76 was significantly associated with SCC risk and HPV 9 with BCC risk. In summary, seropositivity for certain HPV types was associated with an increased risk for future development of SCC and BCC.
PubMed ID
22419740 View in PubMed
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Pseudovirion-binding and neutralizing antibodies to cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPV) correlated with the presence of HPV DNA in skin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116969
Source
J Gen Virol. 2013 May;94(Pt 5):1096-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Helena Faust
Kristin Andersson
Ola Forslund
Joakim Dillner
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
J Gen Virol. 2013 May;94(Pt 5):1096-103
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Neutralizing - blood
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Austria - epidemiology
Biopsy
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology - virology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - virology
Case-Control Studies
DNA, Viral - genetics
Humans
Keratosis, Actinic - epidemiology - virology
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - genetics - immunology - metabolism
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Skin - virology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Species Specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Whereas the antibody response to the anogenital human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is known to be mainly type-specific, correlated with the presence of viral DNA and mainly directed to conformational epitopes of the virion, it is not known if this applies also to the antibody response to cutaneous HPVs. For 434 non-immunosuppressed patients with skin lesions (squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma of the skin, actinic keratosis and benign skin lesions), we compared HPV DNA status with seroreactivity to HPV pseudovirions (PsV) and to GST-L1 fusion proteins from HPV types -5, -6, -15, -16, -32 and -38. Biopsies from the skin lesions were tested for the presence of HPV DNA using three different PCR methods, with typing by sequencing. Serum samples from subjects with HPV DNA-positive biopsies and randomly selected serum samples from subjects with HPV DNA-negative biopsies were also tested with neutralization assays with HPV5, -38 and -76 PsV. Agreement of the three serological methods varied from poor to moderate. Type-specific seroprevalences among patients positive for the same type of HPV DNA (sensitivity of serology) was improved with the PsV-based method (mean of 40%, maximum 63%) compared with the GST-L1 method (mean of 20%, maximum of 25%). Neutralization was the most sensitive assay for HPV38 (50%). In summary, cutaneous HPVs also appear to induce a type-specific antibody response that correlates with the presence of HPV DNA and that can be detected with improved sensitivity using PsV-based serology.
PubMed ID
23343629 View in PubMed
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Repeat prescriptions: refill adherence in relation to patient and prescriber characteristics, reimbursement level and type of medication.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29511
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2005 Dec;15(6):621-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Kristin Andersson
Arne Melander
Carin Svensson
Owe Lind
J Lars G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
NEPI Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2005 Dec;15(6):621-6
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmacies
Prescriptions, Drug
Reimbursement Mechanisms
State Medicine
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Repeat prescribing used in long-term pharmacotherapy is often associated with inadequate patient medication, including non-adherence. In this paper we explore patients' drug refill adherence with repeat prescriptions and relate refill data to patient age and gender, type of prescriber, type of prescribed drug, and reimbursement level. METHODS: During one week of 2002, copies of 3636 repeat prescriptions filled at 16 large Swedish pharmacies were collected. Satisfactory refill adherence was defined as dispensed refills covering 80-120% of the prescribed treatment time. Under- and oversupplying were defined as 120% coverage, respectively. RESULTS: The average level of refill adherence was 57%, and the level of under- and oversupplying 21% and 22%, respectively. There was no gender difference. Patients who were exempt from payment had higher oversupplies than others (33% versus 19%), and patients of general practitioners had higher refill adherence than patients of hospital physicians. The highest refill adherence was observed for contraceptives (81%) and the lowest for anti-asthmatics, proton pump inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (30-40%). CONCLUSIONS: Refill non-adherence includes both under- and oversupplying and may vary due to different attitudes between prescribers and between patients. Different therapeutic indications and reimbursement systems are other apparent causes. These observations should be considered in programs aiming to assist patients in following medication prescriptions.
PubMed ID
16126746 View in PubMed
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