Skip header and navigation

Refine By

13 records – page 1 of 2.

Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Dec 16;124(24):3178
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-2004

Consultations for gastroenteritis in general practice and out-of-hours services in Norway 2006-15.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310697
Source
Fam Pract. 2019 10 08; 36(5):614-620
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-08-2019
Author
Knut Erik Emberland
Knut-Arne Wensaas
Sverre Litleskare
Guri Rortveit
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Fam Pract. 2019 10 08; 36(5):614-620
Date
10-08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
After-Hours Care - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Family Practice - organization & administration
Female
Gastroenteritis - diagnosis - virology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Point-of-Care Testing - organization & administration
Primary Health Care - methods
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Most of the patients with gastroenteritis seeking health care services are managed in primary care; yet, little is known about these consultations. Syndromic-based surveillance of gastrointestinal infections is used in several countries, including Norway.
To investigate the extent of, and explore characteristics associated with, consultations for gastroenteritis in primary care and to compare consultations in daytime general practice and out-of-hours (OOH) services in Norway.
Registry-based study using reimbursement claims data from all consultations in general practice and OOH services in Norway over the 10-year period, 2006-15.
The main outcome variable was whether the consultation took place in general practice or OOH services. Possible associations with patient age and sex, time and use of point-of-care C-reactive protein (CRP) testing and sickness certificate issuing were investigated.
Gastroenteritis consultations (n = 1 281 048) represented 0.9% of all consultations in primary care (n = 140 199 637), of which 84.4% were conducted in general practice and 15.6% in OOH services. Young children and young adults dominated among the patients. Point-of-care CRP testing was used in 36.1% of the consultations. Sickness certificates were issued in 43.6% of consultations with patients in working age. Age-specific time variations in consultation frequencies peaking in winter months were observed.
The proportion of gastroenteritis consultations was higher in the OOH services when compared with daytime general practice. Young children and young adults dominated among the patients. The seasonal variation in consultation frequency is similar to that shown for gastroenteritis caused by norovirus.
PubMed ID
30689824 View in PubMed
Less detail

General practice consultations and use of prescription drugs after changes to school absence policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287475
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 09 05;137(16)
Publication Type
Article
Date
09-05-2017
Author
Inger Johanne Bakken
Knut-Arne Wensaas
Kari Furu
Gry Marysol Grøneng
Camilla Stoltenberg
Simon Øverland
Siri Eldevik Håberg
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 09 05;137(16)
Date
09-05-2017
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Analgesics - supply & distribution
Anti-Bacterial Agents - supply & distribution
Antitussive Agents - supply & distribution
Contraceptive Agents - supply & distribution
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Gastrointestinal Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Headache - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Multi-Ingredient Cold, Flu, and Allergy Medications - supply & distribution
Norway - epidemiology
Policy
Psychotropic Drugs - supply & distribution
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Regression Analysis
Remote Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Schools - standards
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
New rules for absence with stricter requirements for documentation were introduced in upper secondary schools in the autumn of 2016. We investigated the use of general practice services and dispensing of prescription drugs among 16?–?18-year-olds in the autumn of 2016 and compared this with equivalent figures for the period 2013?–?15.
We retrieved information on consultations in general practice (GP) and dispensing of prescription drugs to 15?–?18-year-olds in the period 2013?–?16 from the Directorate of Health’s system for control and payment of health reimbursements (KUHR) and the Norwegian Prescription Database respectively. The number of consultations and dispensing of drugs were compared to previous years using Poisson regression (reference year 2015). The incidence rate ratio (IRR) was used as an outcome measure.
The number of GP consultations for 16?–?18-year-olds was 30?% higher in the autumn of 2016 than in the autumn of 2015 (IRR 1.30, 95?% confidence interval (CI) 1.29?–?1.31). In the same period, the dispensing of drugs to this age group increased by 8?% (IRR 1.08, 95?% CI 1.08?–?1.09). Among the diagnosis groups, respiratory tract infections had the largest increase (IRR 2.21, 95?% CI 2.17?–?2.25). The largest increase in drug dispensing was found for remedies for coughs and colds (IRR 1.73, 95?% CI 1.65?–?1.80).
The increase in consultations in general practice and dispensing of drugs to 16?–?18-year-olds coincided in time with the introduction of new rules for absence from school. We hold it to be highly likely that the changes were caused by the stricter rules for documentation of absence from school.
PubMed ID
28871761 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of atopic disease on the risk of post-infectious fatigue and irritable bowel syndrome 3 years after Giardia infection. A historic cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122989
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Sep;47(8-9):956-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Gunnhild S Hunskar
Nina Langeland
Knut-Arne Wensaas
Kurt Hanevik
Geir Egil Eide
Kristine Mørch
Guri Rortveit
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. gunnhild.hunskar@student.uib.no
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Sep;47(8-9):956-61
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Disease Outbreaks
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Giardiasis - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Infant
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate whether atopic disease influences the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and chronic fatigue (CF) after giardiasis.
A questionnaire was sent to all confirmed cases of giardiasis after a Norwegian outbreak, with response rate of 65.3% (817/1252). Controls were randomly selected matched on age and sex, with response rate of 31.4% (1128/3598). Associations were evaluated by use of logistic regression analyses.
In the Giardia exposed group, 47.8% of those with asthma had IBS compared with 45.3% in those without asthma (p = 0.662). For controls, corresponding percentages were 23.9% and 12.2% (p
PubMed ID
22746290 View in PubMed
Less detail

Influenza-like illness in Norway: clinical course, attitudes towards vaccination and preventive measures during the 2009 pandemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131578
Source
Fam Pract. 2012 Apr;29(2):139-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Kristian A Simonsen
Steinar Hunskaar
Knut-Arne Wensaas
Sverre Rørtveit
Rebecca Cox
Gro Njølstad
Guri Rortveit
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for General Practice, Uni Health, Bergen, Norway. kristian.simonsen@isf.uib.no
Source
Fam Pract. 2012 Apr;29(2):139-46
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza Vaccines - therapeutic use
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pandemics
Patient compliance
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To document clinical characteristics of influenza-like illness, reported use of health preventive measures and attitudes towards vaccination among patients with influenza-like illness in general practice during the influenza pandemic in 2009.
Cross-sectional survey in general practice. Patients, who were identified as having influenza-like illness during the peak of the influenza pandemic activity in Norway, were eligible for inclusion in the study. A questionnaire was sent 2-4 weeks after the patients visit to the GP with influenza-like illness diagnosis during October to December 2009, from general practices in Norway. A sample of responders >18 years also had a blood test to check for serological response to the pandemic H1N1 virus.
Questionnaires were sent to 1324 patients, and 357 (27%) were returned. Fever (91% versus 49%, P
PubMed ID
21896504 View in PubMed
Less detail

Irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue 3 years after acute giardiasis: historic cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131379
Source
Gut. 2012 Feb;61(2):214-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Knut-Arne Wensaas
Nina Langeland
Kurt Hanevik
Kristine Mørch
Geir Egil Eide
Guri Rortveit
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. knut-arne.wensaas@uni.no
Source
Gut. 2012 Feb;61(2):214-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease
Disease Outbreaks
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Giardiasis - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
Giardia lamblia is a common cause of gastroenteritis worldwide, but there is limited knowledge about the long-term complications.
To estimate the relative risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and chronic fatigue 3 years after acute giardiasis.
Controlled historic cohort study with 3 years' follow-up. Data collected by mailed questionnaire.
Waterborne outbreak of giardiasis in the city of Bergen, Norway.
817 patients exposed to Giardia lamblia infection verified by detection of cysts in stool samples and 1128 matched controls.
IBS and chronic fatigue.
The prevalence of IBS in the exposed group was 46.1%, compared with 14.0% in the control group, and the adjusted RR=3.4 (95% CI 2.9 to 3.8). Chronic fatigue was reported by 46.1% of the exposed group and 12.0% of the controls, the adjusted RR was 4.0 (95% CI 3.5 to 4.5). IBS and chronic fatigue were associated and the RR for the exposed group of having a combination of the two outcomes was 6.8 (95% CI 5.3 to 8.5). The RR was also increased for having just one of the two syndromes, 1.8 for IBS (95% CI 1.4 to 2.3) and 2.2 for chronic fatigue (95% CI 1.7 to 2.8).
Infection with Giardia lamblia in a non-endemic area was associated with a high prevalence of IBS and chronic fatigue 3 years after acute illness, and the risk was significantly higher than in the control group. This shows that the potential consequences of giardiasis are more serious than previously known. Further studies are needed, especially in areas where giardiasis is endemic.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011 Nov;8(11):59721989158
PubMed ID
21911849 View in PubMed
Less detail

Irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue 6 years after giardia infection: a controlled prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264060
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Nov 15;59(10):1394-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2014
Author
Kurt Hanevik
Knut-Arne Wensaas
Guri Rortveit
Geir Egil Eide
Kristine Mørch
Nina Langeland
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Nov 15;59(10):1394-400
Date
Nov-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Child
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Giardiasis - complications
Humans
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
Functional gastrointestinal disorders and fatigue may follow acute infections. This study aimed to estimate the persistence, prevalence, and risk of irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue 6 years after Giardia infection.
We performed a controlled prospective study of a cohort of 1252 individuals who had laboratory-confirmed Giardia infection during a waterborne outbreak in 2004. In total, 748 cohort cases (exposed) and 878 matched controls responded to a postal questionnaire 6 years later (in 2010). Responses were compared to data from the same cohort 3 years before (in 2007).
The prevalences of irritable bowel syndrome (39.4%) by Rome III criteria and chronic fatigue (30.8%) in the exposed group 6 years after giardiasis were significantly elevated compared with controls, with adjusted relative risks (RRs) of 3.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-3.9) and 2.9 (95% CI, 2.3-3.4), respectively. In the exposed group, the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome decreased by 6.7% (RR, 0.85 [95% CI, .77-.93]), whereas the prevalence of chronic fatigue decreased by 15.3% from 3 to 6 years after Giardia infection (RR, 0.69 [95% CI, .62-.77]). Giardia exposure was a significant risk factor for persistence of both conditions, and increasing age was a risk factor for persisting chronic fatigue.
Giardia infection in a nonendemic setting is associated with an increased risk for irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue 6 years later. The prevalences of both conditions decrease over time, indicating that this intestinal protozoan parasite may elicit very long-term, but slowly self-limiting, complications.
Notes
Cites: Gut. 2012 Feb;61(2):214-921911849
Cites: J Travel Med. 2014 May-Jun;21(3):153-824621006
Cites: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Sep;47(8-9):956-6122746290
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2012;12:25823061432
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Jul 1;33(1):110-411389503
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2001 Jul;15(7):959-6411421870
Cites: BMC Gastroenterol. 2013;13:2823399438
Cites: Psychol Med. 2009 Nov;39(11):1913-2119366500
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2009;9:20620003489
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2010 Apr;138(4):1502-1320044998
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010;10:16320346102
Cites: Gut. 2010 May;59(5):605-1120427395
Cites: Fam Pract. 2010 Jun;27(3):255-920308244
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2011;11:9721501483
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2002 Apr;122(4):1140-5611910364
Cites: Gut. 2002 Sep;51(3):410-312171965
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Jan 25;326(7382):21912543843
Cites: Gut. 2004 Aug;53(8):1096-10115247174
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1993;37(2):147-538463991
Cites: QJM. 2002 Aug;95(8):527-3812145392
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1998 Jul;45(1):53-659720855
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Nov 18;280(19):1690-19832001
Cites: Acta Unio Int Contra Cancrum. 1953;9(3):531-4113124110
Cites: Q J Med. 1962 Jul;31:307-2213878459
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2005 Jul;129(1):98-10416012939
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Dec 1;41 Suppl 8:S577-8616267722
Cites: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jun;41(6):650-616716962
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2006 May-Jun;68(3):463-916738080
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:14116725025
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2006 Aug;131(2):445-50; quiz 66016890598
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Sep 16;333(7568):57516950834
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2007 May;102(5):1064-917313500
Cites: J Infect. 2007 Dec;55(6):524-3017964658
Cites: J Infect. 2008 Apr;56(4):268-7318328567
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Sep 1;28(5):638-4718564325
Cites: Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2009 May;103(5):530-219185898
Cites: BMC Gastroenterol. 2009;9:2719383162
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jun;107(6):891-922525306
PubMed ID
25115874 View in PubMed
Less detail

Perceived food intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome in a population 3 years after a giardiasis-outbreak: a historical cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271459
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2015;15:164
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sverre Litleskare
Knut-Arne Wensaas
Geir Egil Eide
Kurt Hanevik
Gudrun Elise Kahrs
Nina Langeland
Guri Rortveit
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2015;15:164
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fermentation
Food
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Giardiasis - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Perception
Prevalence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies have shown an increased prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) after acute gastroenteritis. Food as a precipitating and perpetuating factor in IBS has gained recent interest, but food intolerance following gastroenteritis is less investigated. The aims of this study were firstly, to compare perceived food intolerance in a group previously exposed to Giardia lamblia with a control group; secondly, to explore the relation with IBS status; and thirdly, to investigate associations with content of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) in foods reported.
This is a historical cohort study with mailed questionnaire to 1252 Giardia exposed and a control cohort matched by gender and age. Differences between groups were investigated using bivariate and multivariate analyses.
The questionnaire response rate in the exposed group was 65.3 % (817/1252) and in the control group 31.4 % (1128/3598). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for perceived food intolerance for the exposed group was 2.00 with 95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.65 to 2.42, as compared with the control group. Perceived intolerance for dairy products was the most frequently reported intolerance, with an adjusted OR for the exposed of 1.95 (95 % CI: 1.51 to 2.51). Perceived intolerance for fatty foods, vegetables, fruit, cereals and alcohol was also significantly higher in the exposed group. The groups did not differ in perceived intolerance to spicy foods, coffee or soda. The association between exposure to Giardia infection and perceived food intolerance differed between the IBS group and the no-IBS group, but IBS was not a significant effect modifier for the association. Perceived intolerance for high FODMAP foods (adjusted OR 1.91) and low FODMAP foods (adjusted OR 1.55) was significantly associated with exposure status.
Exposure to Giardia infection was associated with perceived food intolerance 3 years after giardiasis. IBS status did not alter the association between exposure status and perceived food intolerance. Perceived intolerance to high FODMAP foods and low FODMAP foods were both statistically significantly associated with exposure to Giardia infection.
Notes
Cites: World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Apr 14;20(14):3976-8524744587
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2009 Jan 28;57(2):554-6519123815
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 Apr 27;177(18):1503-725922242
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Aug 8;55(16):6619-2717625872
Cites: Digestion. 2001;63(2):108-1511244249
Cites: Gut. 2012 Feb;61(2):214-921911849
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2011 Oct;24(5):487-9521615553
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2011 Apr;24(2):154-7621332832
Cites: J Gastroenterol. 2011 Feb;46(2):164-7420848144
Cites: J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Feb;25(2):252-820136989
Cites: Int J Mol Med. 2012 May;29(5):723-3122366773
Cites: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012 Jul;10(7):712-721.e422426087
Cites: J Nutr. 2012 Aug;142(8):1510-822739368
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2001 Apr;15(4):439-4911284772
Cites: Gut. 1989 Aug;30(8):1099-1042767507
Cites: Lancet. 1994 May 7;343(8906):1127-307910231
Cites: Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 1996 Sep;25(3):493-5158863037
Cites: Dig Dis Sci. 2005 Feb;50(2):259-6115745082
Cites: J Nutr. 2006 Feb;136(2):459-6516424128
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 May;60(5):667-7216391571
Cites: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jun;41(6):650-616716962
Cites: Clin Ther. 2006 Oct;28(10):1726-35; discussion 1710-117157129
Cites: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2007 Apr;5(4):457-6017289440
Cites: Dig Liver Dis. 2009 Nov;41(11):788-9319665956
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2014 Apr;27 Suppl 2:36-4723659729
Cites: World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Mar 14;20(10):2456-6924627583
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2014 Jan;146(1):67-75.e524076059
Cites: Int J Clin Pract. 2013 Sep;67(9):895-90323701141
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Jun;37(11):1074-8323574302
Cites: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Sep;47(8-9):956-6122746290
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Nov 15;59(10):1394-40025115874
PubMed ID
26585714 View in PubMed
Less detail

The relationship between irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, chronic fatigue and overactive bladder syndrome: a controlled study 6 years after acute gastrointestinal infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269795
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2015;15:66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Robert Persson
Knut-Arne Wensaas
Kurt Hanevik
Geir Egil Eide
Nina Langeland
Guri Rortveit
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2015;15:66
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Dyspepsia - complications
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - complications
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Giardiasis - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Risk factors
Urinary Bladder, Overactive - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate in a cohort with previous gastrointestinal infection and a control group the prevalence of overactive bladder syndrome (OAB), and how it was associated with three other functional disorders; irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (FD) and chronic fatigue (CF).
Controlled historic cohort study including 724 individuals with laboratory confirmed giardiasis six years earlier, and 847 controls matched by gender and age. Prevalence and odds ratios (OR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.
The prevalence of OAB was 18.7 % (134/716) in the exposed group and 13.6 % (113/833) in the control group (p = 0.007). The association between OAB and IBS was strong in the control group (OR: 2.42; 95 % CI: 1.45 to 4.04), but insignificant in the Giardia exposed (OR: 1.29; 95 % CI: 0.88 to 1.88). The association between OAB and FD was weak in both groups. CF was strongly associated with OAB (OR: 2.73; 95 % CI: 1.85 to 4.02 in the exposed and OR: 2.79; 95 % CI: 1.69 to 4.62 in the controls), and this association remained when comorbid conditions were excluded.
Sporadic IBS was associated with increased risk of OAB, whereas post-infectious IBS was not. An apparent association between OAB and previous Giardia infection can be ascribed to comorbid functional disorders.
Notes
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 May 1;134(9 Pt 2):868-8111346323
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Aug 3;325(7358):265-812153926
Cites: Urology. 2003 Jan;61(1):37-4912559262
Cites: World J Urol. 2003 May;20(6):327-3612811491
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1974 May;99(5):325-324825599
Cites: IARC Sci Publ. 1980;(32):5-3387216345
Cites: Gut. 1986 Jan;27(1):37-403949235
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1993;37(2):147-538463991
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1994 Dec 15;121(12):953-97978722
Cites: Eur Urol. 2005 Mar;47(3):273-615716186
Cites: Eur Urol. 2005 Oct;48(4):622-715964133
Cites: J Urol. 2006 Mar;175(3 Pt 2):S5-1016458739
Cites: J Urol. 2006 Mar;175(3 Pt 1):1063-6; discussion 106616469618
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2006 Apr;130(5):1466-7916678560
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2006 Apr;130(5):1480-9116678561
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Sep 16;333(7568):57516950834
Cites: Eur Urol. 2006 Dec;50(6):1306-14; discussion 1314-517049716
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2007 Dec;102(12):2777-8018042107
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2007 Dec;102(12):2767-7617900326
Cites: BMC Gastroenterol. 2009;9:2719383162
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2009 May;136(6):1979-8819457422
Cites: Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2011 Jun;23(6):524-e20221255194
Cites: J Intern Med. 2011 Oct;270(4):327-3821777306
Cites: Gut. 2012 Feb;61(2):214-921911849
Cites: Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2012 Sep;24(9):821-722616664
Cites: Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2012 Oct;24(10):895-91322863120
Cites: J Urol. 2013 Jan;189(1 Suppl):S66-7423234637
Cites: Int J Clin Pract. 2013 Mar;67(3):205-1623409689
Cites: BJU Int. 2013 Apr;111(4):647-5223106867
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Nov 15;59(10):1394-40025115874
Comment In: Eur Urol. 2015 Dec;68(6):1099-10026545571
PubMed ID
26058591 View in PubMed
Less detail

Severity of Giardia infection associated with post-infectious fatigue and abdominal symptoms two years after.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98621
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2009;9:206
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Kristine Mørch
Kurt Hanevik
Guri Rortveit
Knut-Arne Wensaas
Geir Egil Eide
Trygve Hausken
Nina Langeland
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Tropical Infectious Diseases, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. mokr@helse-bergen.no
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2009;9:206
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - epidemiology - parasitology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Constipation - epidemiology - parasitology
Diarrhea - epidemiology - parasitology
Disease Outbreaks
Fatigue - epidemiology - parasitology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Giardiasis - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nausea - epidemiology - parasitology
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A high rate of post-infectious fatigue and abdominal symptoms two years after a waterborne outbreak of giardiasis in Bergen, Norway in 2004 has previously been reported. The aim of this report was to identify risk factors associated with such manifestations. METHODS: All laboratory confirmed cases of giardiasis (n = 1262) during the outbreak in Bergen in 2004 received a postal questionnaire two years after. Degree of post-infectious abdominal symptoms and fatigue, as well as previous abdominal problems, was recorded. In the statistical analyses number of treatment courses, treatment refractory infection, delayed education and sick leave were used as indices of protracted and severe Giardia infection. Age, gender, previous abdominal problems and symptoms during infection were also analysed as possible risk factors. Simple and multiple ordinal logistic regression models were used for the analyses. RESULTS: The response rate was 81% (1017/1262), 64% were women and median age was 31 years (range 3-93), compared to 61% women and 30 years (range 2-93) among all 1262 cases. Factors in multiple regression analysis significantly associated with abdominal symptoms two years after infection were: More than one treatment course, treatment refractory infection, delayed education, bloating and female gender. Abdominal problems prior to Giardia infection were not associated with post-infectious abdominal symptoms. More than one treatment course, delayed education, sick leave more than 2 weeks, and malaise at the time of infection, were significantly associated with fatigue in the multiple regression analysis, as were increasing age and previous abdominal problems. CONCLUSION: Protracted and severe giardiasis seemed to be a risk factor for post-infectious fatigue and abdominal symptoms two years after clearing the Giardia infection.
PubMed ID
20003489 View in PubMed
Less detail

13 records – page 1 of 2.