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Changes in restorative caries treatment in 15-year-olds in Oslo, Norway, 1979-1996.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184612
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2003 Aug;31(4):246-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Anne Løvberg Gimmestad
Dorthe Holst
Knut Fylkesnes
Author Affiliation
Dental Faculty, Community Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. annelgi@odont.uio.no
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2003 Aug;31(4):246-51
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
DMF Index
Decision Making
Dental Caries - epidemiology - therapy
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Abstract
To examine changing patterns regarding restorative treatment criteria for dental caries.
A representative sample (n = 215) was drawn from all 15-year-olds receiving dental treatment in the Public Dental Service (PDS) in Oslo, Norway for each of the years 1979, 1989, 1993 and 1996. Information from clinical records and bitewing radiographs on caries treatment was collected. The results presented in this paper pertain to 198, 201, 209 and 208 subjects in each group.
The results revealed dramatic changes in the use of restorative treatment criteria. Only 16% of tooth surfaces were treated in 1996 according to the criteria from 1979. The number of sound surfaces was found to have increased by 39% whereas the number of filled surfaces was reduced by 92%. In spite of more stringent criteria for restorative treatment, the number of D4 lesions did not increase.
The practice of change in restorative treatment continued during the 17 years of study. Though the number of decayed surfaces appeared to be stable during the period, in reality, there was a reduction in caries occurrence during the first 10-year period (1979-1989). A conceptual model of dentists' caries-related treatment decisions outlined by Bader & Shugars may be used to explain parts of the rapid change in the criteria used in the PDS in Oslo.
PubMed ID
12846846 View in PubMed
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The Finnmark Intervention Study: do community-based intervention programmes threaten self-rated health and well-being? Experiences from BÃ¥tsfjord, a fishing village in North Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3296
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2005 Feb;15(1):91-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Beate Søholt Lupton
Vinjar Fønnebø
Anne Johanne Søgaard
Knut Fylkesnes
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2005 Feb;15(1):91-6
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Fisheries
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Loneliness
Male
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Abstract
AIM: Examine negative side-effects on self-rated health and well-being of a community-based intervention in a fishing community in the Norwegian Arctic. METHOD: A cohort study with quasi-experimental design with one intervention community and three control communities from the same area. There was a baseline screening (1987), three years intervention (1988-1991) and a rescreening (1993). Of the invited (aged 20-62 years in 1987), 668 (64%) males and 656 (72%) females met at both screenings. The main outcome variables were self-rated health, mental health variables, and preoccupation with health. Those answering the relevant questions at both screenings were analysed. High-risk and low-risk males were analysed separately. There were too few females in the high-risk group to do separate analyses. RESULTS: The main findings among the low-risk group were: Males in Batsfjord did not differ from males in the control communities. Among females, there was a reduction in the proportion depressed of 20.4% points in Batsfjord and 9.6% in the control communities (p adjusted=0.060). There was also a decrease in the proportion lonely of 19.2% points and 5.8% respectively (p adjusted=0.005). In the male high-risk group there was a decrease in the proportion lonely by 14.7% points in Batsfjord and an increase by 5.9% in the control communities (p adjusted=0.004). CONCLUSION: We have not found that an intervention programme using local empowerment, mass strategies, and intervention on high-risk cases has serious negative side effects on self-rated health, well-being or preoccupation with health.
PubMed ID
15788810 View in PubMed
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