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Can learning potential in schizophrenia be assessed with the standard CVLT-II? An exploratory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158202
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2008 Apr;49(2):179-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Anja Vaskinn
Kjetil Sundet
Svein Friis
Torill Ueland
Carmen Simonsen
Astrid B Birkenaes
John A Engh
Stein Opjordsmoen
Ole A Andreassen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. anja.vaskinn@medisin.uio.no
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2008 Apr;49(2):179-86
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aptitude
Cognition
Female
Humans
Learning
Learning Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Male
Mental Recall
Neuropsychological Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Schizophrenia - complications
Schizophrenic Psychology
Semantics
Social Behavior
Verbal Learning
Abstract
This study examined the potential of using the regular administration of a common neuropsychological test, the CVLT-II, to assess learning potential in schizophrenia. Based on List A trial 1 performance and the learning slope, a schizophrenia sample was divided into three learning potential groups (non-learners, learners and high-achievers) that differed in the use of learning strategies. High-achievers utilized more semantic clustering than learners and non-learners, and non-learners were less consistent in words recalled than the other two groups. This standard administration approach is a promising, time-saving alternative to the modified tests of learning potential used so far.
PubMed ID
18352988 View in PubMed
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Cannabis use and premorbid functioning as predictors of poorer neurocognition in schizophrenia spectrum disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118693
Source
Schizophr Res. 2013 Jan;143(1):84-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
P Andreas Ringen
Ingrid Melle
Akiah O Berg
Ingrid Agartz
Olav Spigset
Carmen Simonsen
Kjetil Sundet
Ole A Andreassen
Author Affiliation
KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, N-0424 Oslo, Norway. p.a.ringen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Schizophr Res. 2013 Jan;143(1):84-9
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attention
Cannabinoids - urine
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Executive Function
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - complications - epidemiology - psychology - urine
Memory
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychomotor Performance
Regression Analysis
Schizophrenia - complications - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Verbal Learning
Young Adult
Abstract
Evidence of associations between neurocognitive function and cannabis use in schizophrenia is inconclusive. However, direct measures of cannabis intake and premorbid function are rarely explored in this context. We investigated the relation between cannabis use, determined by its presence in urine, and neurocognitive functioning in schizophrenia controlling for the potential bias of premorbid functioning.
Naturalistic study of 364 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder from catchment areas in Oslo, Norway. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between cannabis in urine and measures of neurocognitive functioning, with adjustment for confounders, including premorbid functioning.
Cannabis was detected in the urine of 21 patients, who had significant dysfunction in several neurocognitive domains independent of a current diagnosis of cannabis abuse. However, level of premorbid functioning explained the associations for all measures.
Differences in premorbid functioning may explain apparent differences in neurocognitive function between schizophrenia spectrum patients using cannabis or not. The findings suggest that illness-related traits present early in life can affect both later cannabis use and neurocognition, probably by complex mechanisms.
PubMed ID
23178107 View in PubMed
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Catechol O-methyltransferase variants and cognitive performance in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder versus controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142371
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Sep;122(1-3):31-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Katrine V Wirgenes
Srdjan Djurovic
Kjetil Sundet
Ingrid Agartz
Morten Mattingsdal
Lavinia Athanasiu
Ingrid Melle
Ole A Andreassen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Sep;122(1-3):31-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Bipolar Disorder - complications - genetics
Catechol O-Methyltransferase - genetics
Cognition Disorders - etiology - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Male
Methionine - genetics
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Schizophrenia - complications - genetics
Valine - genetics
Abstract
The gene encoding Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT), a dopamine catabolic enzyme, is an important candidate gene in several psychiatric disorders. Several studies have shown an association between the functional Val(158)Met polymorphism and cognitive performance. However, the results have been inconsistent and there are few studies addressing other COMT single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).
We investigated SNPs across the whole COMT gene, including the Val(158)Met polymorphism, for a putative effect on working memory, executive function and IQ in 315 patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and 340 healthy controls.
We replicated the association between the Val(158)Met variant and working memory performance, and found a significant interaction between this SNP and diagnosis, with patients with schizophrenia showing a specific, reduced performance on the 2-back test. Several other COMT SNPs were associated with different cognitive functions, but did not remain significant after controlling for multiple testing. We also found significant interaction effects between the SNP variants and gender.
The present study replicates earlier findings showing an association between the functional Val(158)Met polymorphism and working memory performance, with schizophrenia subjects particularly vulnerable. Furthermore, our findings suggest that other parts of the COMT gene seem to affect several related cognitive domains, which further support the notion that COMT is a modifier gene in prefrontal dopamine functioning.
PubMed ID
20605701 View in PubMed
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The Chernobyl accident and cognitive functioning: a study of Norwegian adolescents exposed in utero.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139670
Source
Dev Neuropsychol. 2010;35(6):643-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kristin Sverdvik Heiervang
Sarnoff Mednick
Kjetil Sundet
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. k.s.heiervang@psykologi.uio.no
Source
Dev Neuropsychol. 2010;35(6):643-55
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Brain - radiation effects
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Cognition - radiation effects
Disasters
Executive Function - radiation effects
Female
Humans
Male
Memory, Short-Term - radiation effects
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - psychology
Psychomotor Performance - radiation effects
Radioactive Hazard Release
Verbal Learning - radiation effects
Abstract
The results of investigations on the cognitive outcomes of adolescents exposed prenatally to radiation from Chernobyl are inconsistent. In 2005 through 2006, we assessed individuals exposed prenatally (N = 84) and controls (N = 94) using a broad neuropsychological test battery. Neuropsychological performance was significantly weaker in the 84 adolescents exposed prenatally compared to the 94 controls on measures of verbal working memory, verbal memory, and executive functioning when controlling for possible confounders. Our findings add new and important support to the hypothesis that the Chernobyl accident had a specific effect on the neuropsychological functioning of those exposed prenatally.
PubMed ID
21038158 View in PubMed
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[Congenital hypothyroidism and the impact of thyroxine treatment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29346
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Nov 17;125(22):3101-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-17-2005
Author
Beate Ørbeck
Kjetil Sundet
Jens Veilemand Jørgensen
Bengt Frode Kase
Sonja Heyerdahl
Author Affiliation
Regionsenter for barn og unges psykiske helse, Helseregion Øst & Sør (R-BUP), Postboks 23 Tåsen, 0801 Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Nov 17;125(22):3101-3
Date
Nov-17-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Cognition
Congenital Hypothyroidism - drug therapy - genetics - psychology
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Practice Guidelines
Socioeconomic Factors
Thyroxine - administration & dosage
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We have studied the significance of the thyroxine treatment for neuropsychological functioning in young adults with congenital hypothyroidism. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This is a neuropsychological follow-up study of a three-year cohort of early treated congenital hypothyroidism in Norway (N = 49) at age 20. Siblings comprise the control group (N = 41, 21 years). RESULTS: The patient group performed weaker than the control group on cognitive and motor measures. They reported somewhat more psychosocial problems; fewer completed high school. A more severe hypothyroidism at the time of diagnosis was associated with a larger motor deficit at age 20. Better cognitive function in young adulthood was associated with a higher thyroxine starting dose and serum thyroxine level in the first years of life. Blood samples in young adulthood showed elevated thyrotropin levels in 45% of the patients. INTERPRETATION: This study supports the new guidelines for treatment of congenital hypothyroidism with a higher starting dose of 10-15 microg thyroxine/kg/24 hours. The young adults are in need of better medical follow up.
PubMed ID
16299564 View in PubMed
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Congenital hypothyroidism: influence of disease severity and L-thyroxine treatment on intellectual, motor, and school-associated outcomes in young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58359
Source
Pediatrics. 2003 Oct;112(4):923-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Beate Oerbeck
Kjetil Sundet
Bengt F Kase
Sonja Heyerdahl
Author Affiliation
Regional Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Region East and South, Oslo, Norway. beate.orbeck@r-bup.no
Source
Pediatrics. 2003 Oct;112(4):923-30
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Comparative Study
Congenital Hypothyroidism
Educational Measurement
Female
Humans
Hypothyroidism - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Intelligence Tests
Learning Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Neonatal Screening
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Psychomotor Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Siblings
Socioeconomic Factors
Thyroxine - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe intellectual, motor, and school-associated outcome in young adults with early treated congenital hypothyroidism (CH) and to study the association between long-term outcome and CH variables acting at different points in time during early development (CH severity and early L-thyroxine treatment levels [0-6 years]). METHODS: Neuropsychological tests were administered to all 49 subjects with CH identified during the first 3 years of the Norwegian neonatal screening program (1979-1981) at a mean age of 20 years and to 41 sibling control subjects (mean age: 21 years). RESULTS: The CH group attained significantly lower scores than control subjects on intellectual, motor, and school-associated tests (total IQ: 102.4 [standard deviation: 13] vs 111.4 [standard deviation: 13]). Twelve (24%) of the 49 CH subjects had not completed senior high school, in contrast to 6% of the control subjects. CH severity (pretreatment serum thyroxine [T4]) correlated primarily with motor tests, whereas early L-thyroxine treatment levels were related to verbal IQ and school-associated tests. In multiple regression analysis, initial L-thyroxine dose (beta = 0.32) and mean serum T4 level during the second year (beta = 0.48) predicted Verbal IQ, whereas mean serum T4 level during the second year (beta = 0.44) predicted Arithmetic. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term outcome revealed enduring cognitive and motor deficits in young adults with CH relative to control subjects. Verbal functions and Arithmetic were associated with L-thyroxine treatment variables, suggesting that more optimal treatment might be possible. Motor outcome was associated with CH severity, indicating a prenatal effect.
PubMed ID
14523187 View in PubMed
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A double blind evaluation of cognitive decline in a Norwegian cohort of asymptomatic carriers of Huntington's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147371
Source
J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2010 Jul;32(6):590-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Marleen R van Walsem
Kjetil Sundet
Lars Retterstøl
Øyvind Sundseth
Author Affiliation
Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Centre for Rare Disorders, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2010 Jul;32(6):590-8
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Huntington Disease - complications - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Trinucleotide Repeats - genetics
Abstract
Previous studies investigating subclinical signs of cognitive decline in presymptomatic carriers of Huntington's disease (HD) have shown conflicting results. The current study examines cognition in 105 at-risk individuals, using a broad neuropsychological test battery and adopting strict inclusion criteria for attaining a homogeneous sample. Results obtained by analyses of variance and effect size calculations indicate no clinical evidence of significant cognitive decline in asymptomatic HD carriers very far from onset of illness compared to noncarriers. Closeness to disease onset amongst gene carriers influenced cognition negatively whereas cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeat size did not. The findings call for longitudinal follow-up studies using a combination of clinical instruments and experimental paradigms to pinpoint when subtle cognitive deficits occur and within which of the cognitive domains.
PubMed ID
19916101 View in PubMed
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Excessive cannabis use is associated with earlier age at onset in bipolar disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137601
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2011 Sep;261(6):397-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Trine V Lagerberg
Kjetil Sundet
Sofie R Aminoff
Akiah O Berg
Petter A Ringen
Ole A Andreassen
Ingrid Melle
Author Affiliation
Department of Research and Development, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Norway. t.v.lagerberg@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2011 Sep;261(6):397-405
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Confidence Intervals
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate which factors are associated with age at onset in bipolar disorder with a specific focus on excessive alcohol and cannabis use, and the sequence of the onsets of excessive substance use and bipolar disorder. We investigated a naturalistic sample of 151 patients with bipolar I and II disorder receiving psychiatric treatment. Whether the presence of excessive substance use prior to bipolar disorder onset or the type of substance used (alcohol or cannabis) was associated with differences in age at onset was investigated using hierarchical and multiple linear regression analyses, adjusting for potential confounders. Patients with excessive alcohol use had a significantly later onset compared with patients with excessive cannabis use. Excessive general substance use prior to bipolar disorder onset was associated with a later onset. However, excessive cannabis use was associated with an earlier onset whether it preceded or followed bipolar disorder onset, also after adjusting for possible confounders. Excessive use of alcohol or other substances was not independently associated with age at onset in multivariate analyses. Alcohol use was associated with a later onset compared with cannabis use, suggesting different relationships to the onset of bipolar disorder. Lifetime use of cannabis predicted an earlier onset, independent of the sequence of onsets. This indicates that an early onset may increase the risk of cannabis use and that cannabis use may trigger bipolar disorder in vulnerable individuals.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21267743 View in PubMed
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Excessive substance use in bipolar disorder is associated with impaired functioning rather than clinical characteristics, a descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98240
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Trine V Lagerberg
Ole A Andreassen
Petter A Ringen
Akiah O Berg
Sara Larsson
Ingrid Agartz
Kjetil Sundet
Ingrid Melle
Author Affiliation
Section for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital, Bygg 49, Kirkevn, 166 N-0407 Oslo, Norway. t.v.lagerberg@medisin.uio.no
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Comorbidity
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Street Drugs - adverse effects
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is a strong association between bipolar disorder (BD) and substance use disorder (SUD). The clinical and functional correlates of SUD in BD are still unclear and little is known about the role of excessive substance use that does not meet SUD criteria. Thus, the aims of the current study were to investigate lifetime rates of illicit substance use in BD relative to the normal population and if there are differences in clinical and functional features between BD patients with and without excessive substance use. METHODS: 125 consecutively recruited BD in- and outpatients from the Oslo University Hospitals and 327 persons randomly drawn from the population in Oslo, Norway participated. Clinical and functional variables were assessed. Excessive substance use was defined as DSM-IV SUD and/or excessive use according to predefined criteria. RESULTS: The rate of lifetime illicit substance use was significantly higher among patients compared to the reference population (OR = 3.03, CI = 1.9-4.8, p
PubMed ID
20105311 View in PubMed
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Frequency and characteristics of recurrent major depressed patients with unimpaired executive functions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45662
Source
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2005;6(1):36-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Kirsten I Stordal
Astri J Lundervold
Arnstein Mykletun
Arve Asbjørnsen
Eva Biringer
Jens Egeland
Asa Hammar
Nils Inge Landrø
Atle Roness
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Kjetil Sundet
Anders Lund
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, Section of Psychiatry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. kirsten.irene.stordal@helse-bergen.no
Source
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2005;6(1):36-44
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aptitude
Cognition Disorders - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Intelligence
Male
Mathematical Computing
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Prognosis
Psychometrics
Recurrence
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Major depression is associated with impairment of cognitive functions, and especially higher-order cognitive processes referred to as executive functions (EF). Whether this is a general finding is unclear. Patients without EF impairment may have different treatment needs than patients with EF impairment, and will probably have a better everyday functioning. Thus, it is important to identify the prevalence and characteristics of depressed patients without EF impairment. Forty-three patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (19-51 years) and 50 healthy controls were included in the study. The subjects were assessed with neuropsychological tests selected to measure central areas of EF, and screened on clinical and demographic variables. Within the depressed group, a total of 56% were defined as EF unimpaired. These patients were characterised by higher intellectual abilities and fewer depression episodes than the subgroup of patients with EF impairment. The subgroups were similar in age at debut of illness, severity of depression, general psychopathology and global level of functioning. In conclusion, about half of patients with recurrent major depression have normal EF. Since cognitive impairment and depressive symptomatology seem to be distinct dimensions, a neuropsychological investigation could help to ensure optimal treatment in patients with recurrent major depression.
PubMed ID
16097404 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.