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13 records – page 1 of 2.

Antipsychotic medication and length of stay at a psychiatric maximum-security unit in Norway (1987-2000).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169616
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2006;60(2):132-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Sabine Renkel
Kirsten Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Regional sikkerhetsavd, Brøset/St.Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. sabine.renkel@pst-stfk.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2006;60(2):132-6
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Clopenthixol - therapeutic use
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Maximum Tolerated Dose
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Schizophrenia - drug therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Time Factors
Violence - prevention & control
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate psychopharmacological treatment and the length of stay (LOS) of patients with schizophrenia in a maximum-security psychiatric unit. Data were collected from the hospital files of 82 consecutively admitted patients with schizophrenia who were both admitted and discharged between the years 1987 and 2000. Psychotropic medication and LOS at the time of discharge were registered. Ninety-five per cent of the patients received antipsychotic medication. Zuclopenthixol was the most frequent medication, given to 43% of the patients. Antipsychotic polypharmacy was found in 20% of the cases. Twenty-seven per cent of the patients were medicated with doses above the recommended therapeutic dose range. During the study period, there was no change in the administration and number of psychotropics, but there was an increase in the dosage of antipsychotics. However, LOS was unchanged during the same time. This supports other findings, which suggest that there is no clinical benefit of higher antipsychotic dosage. It is suggested that an optimized medication practice could yield beneficiary effects, not only for schizophrenic symptoms, but also for violence in schizophrenic patients.
PubMed ID
16635932 View in PubMed
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Association between combined properdin and mannose-binding lectin deficiency and infection with Neisseria meningitidis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29317
Source
Mol Immunol. 2006 Feb;43(5):473-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Lise Bathum
Heidi Hansen
Børge Teisner
Claus Koch
Peter Garred
Kirsten Rasmussen
Palle Wang
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. l.bathum@ouh.fyns-amt.dk
Source
Mol Immunol. 2006 Feb;43(5):473-9
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alleles
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Complement Pathway, Alternative
DNA Mutational Analysis
Denmark
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Epistasis, Genetic
Exons - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Mannose-Binding Lectin - blood - deficiency - genetics
Meningitis, Meningococcal - genetics
Neisseria meningitidis
Pedigree
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions (Genetics) - genetics
Properdin - deficiency - genetics
RNA Splice Sites - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Individuals genetically deficient of properdin are more susceptible to meningococcal disease. Likewise low concentration or decreased biological activity of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is associated with higher incidence of bacterial infections during childhood. In this study we report our findings in a Danish family with a remarkably high incidence of meningococcal meningitis-in total four cases, one of them fatal. METHODS: Properdin and MBL were quantified by ELISA and the properdin gene was screened for sequence variations using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and subsequent sequencing of abnormal patterns. The MBL gene was genotyped for the three known variant alleles (B, C and D) as well as three promoter polymorphisms (-221Y/X, -550H/L and +4P/Q). RESULTS: Two out of six males with undetectable properdin activity had meningitis. They had also low MBL serum levels or carried an MBL variant allele, whereas high MBL concentrations were measured in three out of four properdin deficient males--without meningitis. A splice site mutation in exon 10 (c.1487-2A>G) was found in the properdin gene and co segregated with biochemically measured properdin deficiency. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that a combined deficiency of both properdin and MBL increases the risk of infection with Neisseria meningitidis and stress the importance of epistatic genetic interactions in disease susceptibility.
PubMed ID
16337490 View in PubMed
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Challenging behaviour in the elderly-monitoring violent incidents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170268
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;21(4):368-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Roger Almvik
Kirsten Rasmussen
Phil Woods
Author Affiliation
St Olav's University Hospital Trondheim, Forensic Department and Research Centre Bröset, Trondheim, Norway. roger.almvik@ntnu.no
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;21(4):368-74
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aggression
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To explore the frequency and nature of violent incidents in psychogeriatric wards and nursing homes in terms of type and severity of incidents, what provoked the incidents, and what kind of measure was needed to stop the aggression.
Aggressive behaviour of the study group was monitored using the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised (SOAS-R( in two Norwegian nursing homes and two geriatric psychiatric wards for a period of three months. Severity of incidents were monitored with the built-in severity scoring system in SOAS-R.
During the study period 32 out of the 82 patients were reported to be violent. The majority of the incidents were generated by a minority of the patients. Physical injury to the staff as a consequence of the aggression was extremely rare. Situations where the client was denied something were the most provocative ones and a substantial number of incidents occurred at bath/shower times. Talking to the patient was the most frequent measure used to stop the aggression, but more intrusive measures were also used.
A substantial proportion of the incidents were associated with personal care tasks, suggesting a crucial role for communication difficulties and a focus for staff training. We suggest that personal care situations should be added to the variable list in future research.
PubMed ID
16534771 View in PubMed
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[Controversial measure for a handicapped group].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184757
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Jun 26;123(13-14):1821
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Kirsten Rasmussen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Jun 26;123(13-14):1821
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Mental health services
Mentally Disabled Persons - psychology
Norway
Prisoners - psychology
Prisons
Social Isolation
PubMed ID
12830252 View in PubMed
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The importance of early anti-social behaviour among men with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder in a specialist forensic psychiatry hospital unit in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96341
Source
Crim Behav Ment Health. 2010 Jul 14;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-14-2010
Author
Liselotte Pedersen
Kirsten Rasmussen
Peter Elsass
Helle Hougaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Mental Health Centre Sct. Hans, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Crim Behav Ment Health. 2010 Jul 14;
Date
Jul-14-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background People with a major mental disorder are at increased risk of committing crimes, especially violent crimes, compared with the general population. Sub-groups have been identified based on age of onset of anti-social or violent behaviour. Mentally disordered offenders with early onset anti-social behaviour tend to have a lifelong pattern of it, but in a clinical setting, are they easily identifiable as a distinct sub-group?Aims Our main aim was to establish whether distinct groups of early and later onset offenders can be identified from the standard clinical record of men with schizophrenia spectrum disorders selected for hospital treatment after conviction for a serious crime, and to test the hypothesis that even in such a clinically selected group, early onset offending would be associated with subsequent persistent and versatile offending.Methods A retrospective case file review of all 83 men with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder in a complete 2-year discharge cohort from one specialist secure forensic hospital unit (2001-2002).Results A sub-group of patients with early onset anti-social behaviour was confirmed. Prior to this specialist hospitalisation, this group had sustained significantly more criminal convictions and were more criminally versatile than their late onset peers.Conclusions The recognition of clinically meaningful sub-groups among hospitalised offender patients seems straightforward, and may be useful in the development of more specifically focused intervention and in making sense of more longer-term outcomes. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
20632435 View in PubMed
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[Norwegian forensic medicine at kitchen tables and park benches].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280581
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 09;136(17):1462-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
09-2016
Author
Kirsten Rasmussen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 09;136(17):1462-3
Date
09-2016
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Forensic Psychiatry - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
27686207 View in PubMed
Less detail

Offending profiles of individuals with autism spectrum disorder: A study of all individuals with autism spectrum disorder examined by the forensic psychiatric service in Norway between 2000 and 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277548
Source
Autism. 2015 Oct;19(7):850-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Sissel Berge Helverschou
Kirsten Rasmussen
Kari Steindal
Erik Søndanaa
Britta Nilsson
Jim Aage Nøttestad
Source
Autism. 2015 Oct;19(7):850-8
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Autism Spectrum Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Employment - psychology
Female
Forensic Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examined the characteristics of adults with autism spectrum disorder who have undergone a forensic examination and explored any relationships between the diagnosis and the offence. The reports described 41 men and 7 women. The autism spectrum disorder was diagnosed late (mean age: 25.3?years), and 22 of the 48 cases were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder for the first time by the forensic experts. The education level and employment status were low. Family networks were close, but social networks outside the family were limited. Co-morbid diagnoses were common, and more than half of the group knew their victims. The examined individuals constitute a vulnerable and heterogeneous group, as do offenders within other diagnostic categories. Unlike most others who commit criminal acts, the majority of the individuals with autism spectrum disorder in this study showed no evidence of substance abuse, had a close relationship to their victims and were willing to confess to the accused crime. No clear association between the characteristics of autism spectrum disorder and the criminal act were identified, but in most cases, autism spectrum disorder characteristics, such as idiosyncratic comprehensions and obsessions appeared to be related to the motive for the offence.
PubMed ID
25976157 View in PubMed
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Predictive factors for more than 3 years' duration of central stimulant treatment in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a retrospective, naturalistic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121242
Source
J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2012 Oct;32(5):645-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Terje Torgersen
Bjørn Gjervan
Hans M Nordahl
Kirsten Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Helse Nord-Troendelag HF, Sykehuset Levanger, Levanger, Norway. terje.torgersen@ntnu.no
Source
J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2012 Oct;32(5):645-52
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antisocial Personality Disorder - complications
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Central Nervous System Stimulants - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Delayed-Action Preparations
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Methylphenidate - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
There is effective short-term central stimulant (CS) treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in adult ADHD, and despite this, many patients discontinue the treatment too early. The present study examines the duration of CS treatment in a Norwegian cohort of adult ADHD to identify predictors for long treatment duration (= 3 years). The data were based on the medical records of a sample of 117 of all 119 adult ADHD patients diagnosed over a period of 8 years in a specific catchment area and treated with CS. A logistic regression model was applied to identify possible predictors for long treatment duration. The sample was severely impaired in terms of comorbidity, educational achievement, and employment. The median duration of CS treatment was 33.0 months. Use of extended-release formulations of methylphenidate predicted long treatment duration positively (odds ratio, 4.420 [95% CI, 1.875-10.419]), whereas baseline antisocial personality disorder predicted long treatment duration negatively (odds ratio, 0.210 [0.085-0.518]). This study showed that it is possible to treat severely impaired and highly comorbid adult ADHD patients with CS over years. The finding that extended-release formulations of methylphenidate predict long treatment duration supports previous research, and it is important to show this association in naturalistic samples such as in the present study. Comorbid antisocial personality disorder was a negative predictor of long CS treatment duration. Univariate analyses also indicate that comorbid substance use disorder is related to shorter duration of CS treatment.
PubMed ID
22926598 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of comorbid substance use disorder during long-term central stimulant treatment in adult ADHD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119416
Source
Atten Defic Hyperact Disord. 2013 Mar;5(1):59-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Terje Torgersen
Bjørn Gjervan
Kirsten Rasmussen
Arne Vaaler
Hans M Nordahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. terje.torgersen@stolav.no
Source
Atten Defic Hyperact Disord. 2013 Mar;5(1):59-67
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - drug therapy - epidemiology
Central Nervous System Stimulants - adverse effects
Comorbidity
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry) - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Central stimulant (CS) therapy is a cornerstone in treatment of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Substance use disorder (SUD) is a common comorbid disorder of ADHD and might complicate the treatment. Our main objectives were to investigate the prevalence of SUD during CS treatment, and identify variables associated with SUD during the treatment. The collection of data was based on a naturalistic, retrospective approach using the medical records of a cohort of all adult ADHD patients (N = 117) starting treatment with CS in a specific catchment area in the period 1997 to May 2005. A logistic regression model was applied to identify possible predictors of SUD during CS treatment. The study showed no onset of SUD during the CS treatment in the group of patients without comorbid SUD at baseline (mean CS treatment length 41.1 months). In the group of patients with comorbid SUD at baseline, 58.5 % had one or more relapses of SUD during treatment (mean CS treatment length 27.9 months). Younger age and comorbid antisocial personality disorder were associated with relapse. In a logistic regression analysis, cannabis abstinence for more than 12 months was a negative predictor for relapse of SUD. CS treatment does not precipitate onset of SUD in adults without previous SUD.
PubMed ID
23104523 View in PubMed
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Psychosocial Vulnerability Among Patients Contacting a Norwegian Sexual Assault Center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274784
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2016 Jul 22;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-2016
Author
Bjarte Frode Vik
Jim Aage Nöttestad
Berit Schei
Kirsten Rasmussen
Cecilie Therese Hagemann
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2016 Jul 22;
Date
Jul-22-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In this study, the objective was to assess the occurrence of specific vulnerability factors among adult and adolescent females attending a Norwegian sexual assault center (SAC). We also explored assault characteristics and investigated whether these characteristics differed between the group of patients with vulnerability factors compared with the group without such factors. We conducted a retrospective descriptive study of 573 women = 12 years of age attending the SAC at St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway, between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2010. A patient was considered vulnerable if at least one of the following features was present: intellectual or physical disability; history of present/former mental health problems; history of present/former alcohol/substance abuse; or former sexual assault. At least one vulnerability factor was present in 59% of the cases. More than one vulnerability factor was present in 29%. Reporting at least one vulnerability factor was associated with a higher patient age, unemployment, a higher frequency of reported light/moderate physical violence, and the documentation of minor body injury. In contrast, those without vulnerability more often were students assaulted during night time, by a casual or stranger assailant and reporting a higher intake of alcohol prior to the assault. There are obvious patterns of differences in the nature of sexual assaults reported among victims with specific vulnerability factors compared with victims without these factors. Future research should address these differences and possible solutions for better protection of especially vulnerable individuals against sexual offenses, such as those with mental health and substance abuse difficulties.
PubMed ID
27449896 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.