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The Danish national multicenter schizophrenia project: assessment of psychotic patients for dynamic psychotherapy (APPP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183471
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2003;57(5):333-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Kristian Valbak
Anne Køster
Kirsten Aaskov Larsen
Jette Rask Nielsen
Birgitte Norrie
Author Affiliation
Department North, Psychiatric Hospital in Aarhus, Risskov, Denmark. kv@psykiatri.aaa.dk
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2003;57(5):333-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Patient Compliance - psychology
Patient Selection
Predictive value of tests
Psychotherapy
Questionnaires
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
Clinicians need guidance in selecting schizophrenic patients for individual psychodynamic psychotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether a 17-item questionnaire (APPP) for quantification of suitability for psychotherapy could predict continuance, adherence and outcome from individual dynamic psychotherapy with patients with schizophrenic psychoses. Therapists rated 72 first-episode patients with schizophrenic psychoses in the initial interview. The scores were then correlated to the course of therapy and change in symptoms. APPP was tested to have good psychometric characteristics and had a satisfactory interrater reliability ((ICC,2)=0.70), when four raters scored eight videotaped interviews with eight different patients. The scale scores were highly correlated to "therapeutic alliance" measured by the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI) and the Active Engagement Scale (AES). APPP suitability gave a good early prediction of adherence to therapy (continued in therapy at least 12 months and a satisfactory number of sessions), but had no predictive value of symptomatic improvement or improved social function after 1 year.
PubMed ID
14522605 View in PubMed
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Third-wave cognitive therapy versus mentalisation-based treatment for major depressive disorder: a randomised clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266353
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(8):e004903
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Janus Christian Jakobsen
Christian Gluud
Mickey Kongerslev
Kirsten Aaskov Larsen
Per Sørensen
Per Winkel
Theis Lange
Ulf Søgaard
Erik Simonsen
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(8):e004903
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Denmark
Depressive Disorder, Major - psychology - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Theory of Mind
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare the benefits and harms of third-wave cognitive therapy versus mentalisation-based therapy in a small sample of depressed participants.
The trial was conducted at an outpatient psychiatric clinic for non-psychotic patients in Roskilde, Denmark.
44 consecutive adult participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder.
18 weeks of third-wave cognitive therapy (n=22) versus 18 weeks of mentalisation-based treatment (n=22).
The primary outcome was the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS) at end of treatment (18 weeks). Secondary outcomes were: remission (HDRS
Notes
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PubMed ID
25138802 View in PubMed
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