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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Babies admitted to NICU/ICU: province of birth and mode of delivery matter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132200
Source
Healthc Q. 2011;14(2):16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Shafagh Fallah
Xi-Kuan Chen
Derek Lefebvre
Jacqueline Kurji
Joanne Hader
Kira Leeb
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Healthc Q. 2011;14(2):16-20
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Canada - epidemiology
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Multiple Birth Offspring - statistics & numerical data
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Abstract
Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and intensive care units (ICUs) provide care for newborns in need of specialized medical attention. Across Canada, rates of NICU/ICU admission vary. Due to the high cost of monitoring and interventions these admissions cost more than general newborn stays - whether the newborn is in a specialized NICU or in an ICU in those facilities without specialized units for newborns. This study explores the variation in NICU/ICU admissions and the characteristics of mothers and newborns associated with an increased likelihood of NICU/ICU admission. We focus further on the association between NICU/ICU admission and Caesarean section (C-section). After excluding multiple births, preterm births, small for gestational age births and those delivered by women with select complications, we find an increased risk for NICU/ICU admission for babies born by C-section as their only indication. NICU/ICU admission following C-section alone may not represent the most desirable pathway of care for these newborns.
PubMed ID
21841387 View in PubMed
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Bariatric surgery in Canada: a focus on day surgery procedures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143111
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13(3):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Janine Arkinson
Hong Ji
Shafagh Fallah
José Pérez
Xi-Kuan Chen
Kira Leeb
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Information, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13(3):15-8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bariatric Surgery - methods - trends
Canada
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Surgicenters - utilization
Young Adult
Abstract
Given the rise in obesity rates, increasing capacity for bariatric surgery has become a focus for some provincial planners. Four types of bariatric procedures are now performed in Canada; however, funding for the procedures varies by jurisdiction. This article provides an update to our previous article documenting the volume of in-patient bariatric procedures but focuses on the extent to which Canadians are increasingly receiving bariatric procedures in day surgery settings.
PubMed ID
20523145 View in PubMed
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CIHI survey. Alternatives to acute care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169580
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(2):22, 24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006

Falls among top reasons for transfers from continuing care to acute care hospitals in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149206
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;12 Spec No Patient:62-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Raymond Przybysz
Heather Dawson
Kira Leeb
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI).
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;12 Spec No Patient:62-6
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Continuity of Patient Care
Databases, Factual
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Patient transfer
Abstract
There are limited data on the quality and safety of care for residents in continuing care settings. An analysis of the main reasons why residents, 75 and older, of continuing care facilities are transferred to acute care demonstrates that two of the top three reasons for transfers result from potentially avoidable events.
PubMed ID
19667779 View in PubMed
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New mental health indicators provide a snapshot on performance of the mental health system in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123545
Source
Healthc Q. 2012;15(2):14-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Carolyn Sandoval
Chantal Couris
Kira Leeb
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Information, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Healthc Q. 2012;15(2):14-6
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals - standards
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - standards
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
Although the general hospital remains an important place for stabilizing crises, most services for mental illnesses are provided in outpatient/community settings. In the absence of comprehensive data at the community level, data that are routinely collected from general hospitals can provide insights on the performance of mental health services for people living with mental illness or poor mental health. This article describes three new indicators that provide a snapshot on the performance of the mental health system in Canada: self-injury hospitalization rate, 30-day readmission rate for mental illness and percentage of patients with repeat hospitalizations for mental illness. Findings suggest a need for the early detection and treatment of mental illnesses and for optimal transitions between general hospitals and community services.
PubMed ID
22688199 View in PubMed
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Planning for Canada's health workforce: looking back, looking forward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184924
Source
Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):12-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Richard Alvarez
Jennifer Zelmer
Kira Leeb
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Information, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):12-26
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Health Manpower - trends
Health Occupations - education
Health planning - trends
Humans
Licensure
National Health Programs - organization & administration - trends
Occupational Health
Patient care team
Population Dynamics
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Abstract
"Are there enough health professionals in Canada, and will they be there when I need them? " Answers to these two seemingly simple questions cover a variety of complex and interrelated factors that are not fully understood, as the report about Canada's Healthcare Providers (CIHI 2001) makes clear. The report appears at a time when Canadian political leaders, healthcare organizations, caregivers and others involved with the healthcare system are looking for creative solutions to the human resources challenges facing the health system. Many of the issues are not new; over the last 50 years they have been raised by various groups and government commissions. But there is a sense of urgency today as options for renewing and sustaining Canada's health system are actively being explored. This essay offers highlights from the report, providing a portrait of what is known (and not known) about the people who work in healthcare across the country. It makes clear that whether there are (or are not) enough healthcare providers is not simply a question of numbers of health professionals. From changes in health and healthcare to shifts in the worklife and practice patterns of professionals, a better understanding of the wide range of factors affecting healthcare providers is essential to further the important debates taking place.
Notes
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):33-9; discussion 76-912811097
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):28-32; discussion 76-912811096
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):40-4; discussion 76-912811098
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):67-70; discussion 76-912811103
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):71-4; discussion 76-912811104
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):61-6; discussion 76-912811102
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):50-5; discussion 76-912813181
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):56-60; discussion 76-912811101
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):45-9; discussion 76-912811099
PubMed ID
12811095 View in PubMed
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Safer care--measuring to manage and improve.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171646
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8 Spec No:86-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Kira Leeb
Jennifer Zelmer
Greg Webster
Indra Pulcins
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Information, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8 Spec No:86-9
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Humans
Information Management
Medical Errors - prevention & control
National Health Programs
Safety Management - organization & administration
PubMed ID
16334078 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.