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Existential challenges in young people living with a cancer diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280810
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2016 Oct;24:54-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Ida Odh
Martina Löfving
Kicki Klaeson
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2016 Oct;24:54-60
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blogging
Existentialism
Female
Humans
Internet
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Neoplasms - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In Sweden, approximately 500 people between the ages of 15 and 39 are diagnosed with cancer each year. When someone is diagnosed with a life-threatening disease, existential issues are easily triggered. Young adults are in a developmental phase of life and are exposed to an extra amount of pressure. The Internet and social media are a daily part of the life of young adults and the use of blogs is common. The aim of this study was to elucidate the theoretical framework of Yalom and his four 'givens' expressed in blogs written by young adults living with various cancer diagnoses in Sweden.
This study used a qualitative method in which written stories from six public blogs were analysed using qualitative content analysis.
The findings offer valuable in-depth knowledge about the existential issues in this population. The results can be described as a journey with several existential challenges and with death as an impending threat. The bloggers' awareness of their mortality was described as creating a sense of loss and existential loneliness.
This study shows that young adults are empowered by the writing of blogs and that blogs can play an important part in increasing wellbeing and a sense of coherence within this population.
PubMed ID
27697277 View in PubMed
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Sexual health in primary health care - a qualitative study of nurses' experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286624
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Jun;26(11-12):1545-1554
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Kicki Klaeson
Lina Hovlin
Hanna Guvå
Anna Kjellsdotter
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Jun;26(11-12):1545-1554
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Primary Care Nursing - psychology
Qualitative Research
Reproductive health
Sweden
Abstract
To illuminate nurses' experiences and opportunities to discuss sexual health with patients in primary health care.
Sexual health is a concept associated with many taboos, and research shows that nurses feel uncomfortable talking to patients about sexual health and therefore avoid it. This avoidance forms a barrier between patient and nurse which prevents nurses from giving satisfactory health care to patients.
A qualitative descriptive design.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine nurses in primary health care in Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.
During the analysis phase, five subcategories and two main categories were identified. The two main categories were as follows: 'factors that influence nurses' opportunities of talking to patients about sexual health' and 'nurses' experiences of talking to patients about sexual health'. Social norms in society were an obstacle for health professionals' opportunities to feel comfortable and act professionally. The nurses' personal attitude and knowledge were of great significance in determining whether they brought up the topic of sexual health or not. The nurses found it easier to bring up the topic of sexual health with middle-aged men with, for example, diabetes. One reason for this is that they found it easier to talk to male patients. A further reason is the fact that they had received training in discussing matters of sexual health in relation to diabetes and other conditions affecting sexual health.
Nurses in primary care express the necessity of additional education and knowledge on the subject of sexual health. The healthcare organisation must be reformed to put focus on sexual health.
Guidelines for addressing the topic of sexual health must be implemented to establish conditions that will increase nurse's knowledge and provide them with the necessary tools for discussing sexual health with patients.
PubMed ID
27324221 View in PubMed
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Talking about sexuality: desire, virility, and intimacy in the context of prostate cancer associations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120933
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2013 Jan;7(1):42-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Kicki Klaeson
Kerstin Sandell
Carina M Berterö
Author Affiliation
School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Sweden. kicki.klaeson@telia.com
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2013 Jan;7(1):42-53
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body Image - psychology
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Masculinity
Men - psychology
Middle Aged
Prostatic Neoplasms - psychology
Self Concept
Sexuality - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Prostate cancer and its outcomes are a real threat for health and well-being for men living in the Western world. The number of men with a diagnosis of prostate cancer, before the age of 65 years, has increased in recent decades. The aim of this study was to explore how some of these Swedish men experienced and talked about their sexuality. Four focus group discussions were performed in the context of associations for prostate cancer. Using qualitative content analysis, it was identified how the diagnosis was a threat to their male identity; the men's vulnerability as a group in society was made explicit. Their sexuality was diminished by their illness experiences. These experiences were difficult to share and talk about with others and therefore connected with silence and sorrow. As a result of this, the informants often played a passive role when or if they discussed issues related to sexuality with someone in the health care organizations. The possibility of voluntarily joining a cancer association was probably highly beneficial for these men. During the sessions, several men expressed the opinion that "it is always great to talk."
PubMed ID
22954556 View in PubMed
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