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Physician perceptions and preferences in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164557
Source
Ann Hematol. 2007 Sep;86(9):631-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Matthew C Cheung
Kevin R Imrie
Heather A Leitch
Laura Y Park-Wyllie
Rena Buckstein
Tony Antoniou
Mona R Loutfy
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Medical Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. matthew.cheung@utoronto.ca
Source
Ann Hematol. 2007 Sep;86(9):631-8
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - utilization
Canada
Choice Behavior
Cyclophosphamide - therapeutic use
Data Collection
Disease Management
Doxorubicin - therapeutic use
Humans
Lymphoma, AIDS-Related - drug therapy
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - psychology
Prednisone - therapeutic use
Vincristine - therapeutic use
Abstract
The optimal management of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphoma (ARL) in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is unclear. We administered a survey to determine physician preferences and perceptions in the management of ARL and to assess the variability in treatment in Canada. Of 196 lymphoma-treating physicians, 117 (63%) responded. The majority of respondents (98%) had a positive attitude towards the treatment of ARL. Most physicians (66%) recommended the concomitant use of cART in the care of their patients with ARL, and a majority (86%) recommended CHOP-like regimens (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) to form the backbone of chemotherapy. The addition of rituximab was preferred by 43% of physicians, while 39% and 18% would either not use rituximab or were unsure of the agent's role, respectively. In logistic regression analysis, use of rituximab was predicted only by location of practice (province); physicians from the province of British Colombia were much more likely to administer rituximab than practitioners from Ontario (odds ratio 41.8; 95% confidence interval 7.44-235.1, p
PubMed ID
17372734 View in PubMed
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Rituximab in lymphoma: a systematic review and consensus practice guideline from Cancer Care Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165528
Source
Cancer Treat Rev. 2007 Apr;33(2):161-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Matthew C Cheung
Adam E Haynes
Ralph M Meyer
Adrienne Stevens
Kevin R Imrie
Author Affiliation
Cancer Care Ontario Program in Evidence-Based Care, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., Canada L8S 4L8. matthew.cheung@utoronto.ca
Source
Cancer Treat Rev. 2007 Apr;33(2):161-76
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Clinical Trials as Topic
Humans
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - drug therapy
Ontario
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Abstract
Rituximab is the first antibody-based therapy approved in cancer. The role of this treatment for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma has evolved significantly since its introduction. We aimed to systematically review the literature on rituximab in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and provide consensus guidelines as to the rational use of this agent. Validated methodology from the Cancer Care Ontario Program in Evidence-Based Care was applied. A comprehensive literature search was completed by reviewers from the Hematology Disease Site Group of Cancer Care Ontario. Data were abstracted from randomized controlled trials of rituximab-containing regimens for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Twenty-three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of rituximab-based therapy were analyzed. Consistent and clinically important benefits in progression-free and overall survival and were seen in the following settings: (1) addition of rituximab to combination chemotherapy for initial treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and other aggressive B-cell lymphomas; (2) addition of rituximab to combination chemotherapy for initial and subsequent treatment of follicular lymphoma and other indolent B-cell lymphomas; and (3) use of rituximab alone as extended maintenance therapy in patients with indolent B-cell lymphomas who have responded to initial treatment. The consensus opinion of the Hematology Disease Site Group is that rituximab is recommended for these indications.
PubMed ID
17240533 View in PubMed
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