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Data collection on patients in emergency departments in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165762
Source
CJEM. 2006 Nov;8(6):417-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Brian H Rowe
Kenneth Bond
Maria B Ospina
Sandra Blitz
Michael Schull
Douglas Sinclair
Michael Bullard
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Alberta, 8440 112th Street, Edmonton, AB.
Source
CJEM. 2006 Nov;8(6):417-24
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Care Surveys
Hospitals - manpower
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - utilization
Abstract
Relatively little is known about the ability of Canadian emergency departments (EDs) and the federal, provincial and territorial governments to quantify ED activity. The objectives of this study were to determine the use of electronic patient data in Canadian EDs, the accessibility of provincial data on ED visits, and to identify the data elements and current methods of ED information system (EDIS) data collection nationally.
Surveys were conducted of the following 3 groups: 1) all ED directors of Canadian hospitals located in communities of >10,000 people, 2) all electronic EDIS vendors, and 3) representatives from the ministries of health from 13 provincial and territorial jurisdictions who had knowledge of ED data collection.
Of the 243 ED directors contacted, 158 completed the survey (65% response rate) and 39% of those reported using an electronic EDIS. All 11 EDIS vendor representatives responded. Most of the vendors provide a similar package of basic EDIS options, with add-on features. All 13 provincial or territorial government representatives completed the survey. Nine (69%) provinces and territories collect ED data, however the source of this information varies. Five provinces and territories collect triage data, and 3 have a comprehensive, jurisdiction-wide, population-based ED database. Thirty-nine percent of EDs in larger Canadian communities track patients using electronic methods. A variety of EDIS vendor options are available and used in Canada.
The wide variation in methods and in data collected presents serious barriers to meaningful comparison of ED services across the country. It is little wonder that the majority of information regarding ED overcrowding in Canada is anecdotal, when the collection of this critical health information is so variable. There is an urgent need to place the collection of ED information on the provincial and national agenda and to ensure that the collection of this information consistent, comprehensive and mandatory.
PubMed ID
17209491 View in PubMed
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Frequency, determinants and impact of overcrowding in emergency departments in Canada: a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160289
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(4):32-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Kenneth Bond
Maria B Ospina
Sandra Blitz
Marc Afilalo
Sam G Campbell
Michael Bullard
Grant Innes
Brian Holroyd
Gil Curry
Michael Schull
Brian H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Capital Health/University of Alberta Evidence-Based Practice Center, Edmonton.
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(4):32-40
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Crowding
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Health Care Surveys
Humans
National Health Programs
Abstract
Several reports have documented the prevalence and severity of emergency department (ED) overcrowding at specific hospitals or cities in Canada; however, no study has examined the issue at a national level. A 54-item, self-administered, postal and web-based questionnaire was distributed to 243 ED directors in Canada to collect data on the frequency, impact and factors associated with ED overcrowding. The survey was completed by 158 (65% response rate) ED directors, 62% of whom reported overcrowding as a major or severe problem during the past year. Directors attributed overcrowding to a variety of issues including a lack of admitting beds (85%), lack of acute care beds (74%) and the increased length of stay of admitted patients in the ED (63%). They perceived ED overcrowding to have a major impact on increasing stress among nurses (82%), ED wait times (79%) and the boarding of admitted patients in the ED while waiting for beds (67%). Overcrowding is not limited to large urban centres; nor is it limited to academic and teaching hospitals. The perspective of ED directors reinforces the need for further examination of effective policies and interventions to reduce ED overcrowding.
PubMed ID
18019897 View in PubMed
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