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Comparison of dental licensure, specialization and continuing education in five countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187932
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2002 Nov;6(4):153-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Titus Schleyer
Kenneth A Eaton
David Mock
Victoire Barac'h
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Informatics, Temple University School of Dentistry, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2002 Nov;6(4):153-61
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Dental, Continuing - organization & administration - standards
France
Germany
Great Britain
Humans
Internationality
Licensure, Dental - legislation & jurisprudence
Questionnaires
Specialties, Dental - education - organization & administration
United States
Abstract
Dental practice and education are becoming more globalized. Greater practitioner and patient mobility, the free flow of information, increasingly global standards of care and new legal and economic frameworks (such as European Union [EU] legislation) are forcing a review of dental licensure, specialization and continuing education systems. The objective of this study was to compare these systems in Canada, France, Germany, the UK and the US. Representatives from the five countries completed a 29-item questionnaire, and the information was collated and summarized qualitatively. Statutory bodies are responsible for licensing and re-licensing in all countries. In the two North American countries, this responsibility rests with individual states, and in Europe, with the countries themselves, mainly governed by the legal framework of the EU. In some countries, re-licensure requires completion of continuing education credits. Approaches to dental specialization tend to differ widely with regard to definition of specialities, course and duration of training, training facilities, and accreditation of training programmes. In most countries, continuing education is provided by a number of different entities, such as universities, dental associations, companies, institutes and private individuals. Accreditation and recognition of continuing education is primarily process-driven, not outcome-orientated. Working towards a global infrastructure for dental licensing, specialization and continuing education depends on a thorough understanding of the international commonalities and differences identified in this article.
PubMed ID
12410666 View in PubMed
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Developments in oral health policy in the Nordic countries since 1990.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62745
Source
Oral Health Prev Dent. 2005;3(4):225-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Eeva Widström
Agneta Ekman
Liljan S Aandahl
Maria Malling Pedersen
Helga Agustsdottir
Kenneth A Eaton
Author Affiliation
The National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (Stakes), Helsinki, Finland. eeva.widstrom@stakes.fi
Source
Oral Health Prev Dent. 2005;3(4):225-35
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: There is a number of systems for the provision of oral health care, one of which is the Nordic model of centrally planned oral health care provision. This model has historically been firmly based on the concept of a welfare state in which there is universal entitlement to services and mutual responsibility and agreement to financing them. This study reports and analyses oral health care provision systems and developments in oral health policy in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) since 1990. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Descriptions of and data on the oral health care provision systems in the Nordic countries were obtained from the Chief Dental Officers of the five countries, and contemporary scientific literature was appraised using cross-case analyses to identify generalisable features. RESULTS: It was found that in many respects the system in Iceland did not follow the 'Nordic' pattern. In the other four countries, tax-financed public dental services employing salaried dentists were complemented by publicly subsidised private services. Additional, totally private services were also available to a variable extent. Recently, the availabilty of publicly subsidised oral health care has been extended to cover wider groups of the total population in Finland and Sweden and, to a smaller extent, in Denmark. Concepts from market-driven care models have been introduced. In all five countries, relative to the national populations and other parts of the world, there were high numbers of dentists, dental hygienists and technicians. Access to oral health care services was good and utilisation rates generally high. In spite of anticipated problems with increasing health care costs, more public funds have recently been invested in oral health care in three of the five countries. CONCLUSION: The essential principles of the Nordic model for the delivery of community services, including oral health care, i.e. universal availability, high quality, finance through taxation and public provision, were still adhered to in spite of attempts at privatisation during the 1990 s. It appeared that, in general, the populations of the Nordic countries still believed that there was a need for health and oral health care to be paid for from public funds.
PubMed ID
16475451 View in PubMed
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The healthcare systems and provision of oral healthcare in European Union member states. Part 10: comparison of systems and with the United Kingdom.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309993
Source
Br Dent J. 2019 Aug; 227(4):305-310
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2019
Author
Edward Sinclair
Kenneth A Eaton
Eeva Widström
Author Affiliation
Academic Clinical Fellow in Dental Public Health, Public Health England, Manchester, UK.
Source
Br Dent J. 2019 Aug; 227(4):305-310
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Dental Care
Europe
European Union
France
Germany
Greece
Humans
Ireland
Italy
Poland
Romania
Spain
Sweden
United Kingdom
Abstract
Since 2015, a series of papers which describe the systems for the provision of health and oral healthcare in nine European Union (EU) countries (France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Poland, Romania, Spain and Sweden) have been published in this journal. This tenth and final paper in the series compares aspects of the systems for each country, with each other and with that in the United Kingdom (UK). The topics which have been covered are the organisation and funding of oral healthcare, national populations and oral healthcare workforce, education of dentists, uptake of oral healthcare, expenditure on oral healthcare and oral epidemiology. The comparison shows that there are wide differences between the care provision systems between the individual countries. In all of them, oral healthcare continues to operate outside the mainstream healthcare systems. In particular, the proportion of costs paid for them from public funds, raised through taxation or through compulsory social insurances, and those paid for by individual patients varies greatly. No comparable data exist on quality of care.
PubMed ID
31444448 View in PubMed
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Oral healthcare systems in the extended European union.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29960
Source
Oral Health Prev Dent. 2004;2(3):155-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Eeva Widström
Kenneth A Eaton
Author Affiliation
The National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (Stakes), Helsinki, Finland. eeva.widstrom@stakes.fi
Source
Oral Health Prev Dent. 2004;2(3):155-94
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Health Services - economics - manpower - organization & administration
Dentistry - manpower
Europe - epidemiology
European Union
Health Care Costs
Humans
Insurance, Dental
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Prevalence
Private Sector
Privatization
State Dentistry
Abstract
This article reports a survey of the systems for the provision of oral healthcare in the 28 member and accession states of the EU/EEA in 2003. Descriptions of the systems were collected from the principal dental advisers to governments in the individual states. In many states these were the Chief Dental Officers (CDOs). In states without a CDO, descriptions were gathered from CDO equivalents or senior academics. A template (model description) was used to guide all respondents. Additional statistical information on oral healthcare costs and workforce was collected from the Council of European Chief Dental Officers, WHO and World Bank websites. The study showed that in broad terms there were six patterns (Beveridgian, Bismarkian, The Eastern European (in transition), Nordic, Southern European and Hybrid) for the administration and financing of oral healthcare in the expanding EU. The extent and nature of government involvement in planning and coordinating oral healthcare services and the numbers and pay of the oral healthcare workforce varied between the different models. The biggest recent changes in European oral healthcare were found to have occurred in Eastern Europe, where there has been wide scale privatization of the previously public dental services. However, most of the EU accession (Eastern European) states seemed to be slowly developing insurance systems to cover oral health treatment costs. In the existing EU/EEA, the public dental services such as those in the Nordic countries still have strong political support and some expansion has occurred. In Southern Europe public dental services seemed to have gained some acceptance for the treatment of children and special needs groups. In UK, which has a unique public dental service system, there are plans to make big changes in the delivery, commissioning and remuneration of dental services in the near future. Some EU member states which operate the Bismarkian system with health insurances offering wide population coverage, comprehensive treatment and benefits connected with frequent dental visits, were reported to be experiencing financial problems. The study also indicated that at present, with the exception of Portugal and Spain, where there is dynamic growth in the numbers of dentists, the overall size of the EU/EEA oral health workforce is expanding fairly slowly. Only a minority of member states appeared to collect data on uptake of services and care costs and there were great difficulties in assessing outcomes of care. The data on costs appeared to show wide variations from member state to member state in per capita spending on oral healthcare. In the majority of states, however, costs, especially those in the private sector, could only be estimated. Nevertheless, at a 'macro' level, the study indicated that, in 2000, the 28 member and accession states of the EU/EEA had a total population of 456 million and an oral health workforce of 900,000 (some 300,000 of whom were dentists) and that the cost of oral healthcare was about EUR 54,000,000,000. Conclusion: The study showed wide variations in oral healthcare provision systems between EU/EEA member and accession states and no evidence of harmonization in the past.
PubMed ID
15641621 View in PubMed
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