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Guidelines for the management of head injuries in remote and rural Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175184
Source
Alaska Med. 2004 Jul-Sep;46(3):58-62
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Author
Frank Sacco
Ken Zafren
Ken Brown
Tim Cohen
B J Coopes
John Godersky
Don Hudson
Steve Hyams
David Ingraham
Mike Levy
William Ma
Patricia Martinez
William Montano
John Mithun
James O'Malley
Karen O'Neill
David Powers
Linda Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Alaska Native Medical Center, 4315 Diplomacy Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. fsacco@anmc. org
Source
Alaska Med. 2004 Jul-Sep;46(3):58-62
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Craniocerebral Trauma - diagnosis - therapy
Glasgow Coma Scale
Humans
Medically underserved area
Risk factors
Rural Health Services - standards
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Unconsciousness
Abstract
Numerous recommendations on the initial evaluation and treatment of the head injured patient have been proposed over the last several years. Most assume there is readily available access to computed tomography and neurosurgical specialists. Many clinicians in Alaska must evaluate and begin treatment of head injured patients in circumstances quite different from this. Vast distances, severe weather and limited medical evacuation capability are factors that come into play while caring for these patients. The current medicolegal climate also contributes to clinician anxiety over missing rare but potentially serious injuries. These guidelines developed by Alaska clinicians from multiple specialties are meant to assist clinicians dealing with this very common problem and represent a reasonable approach to these patients in remote and rural Alaska.
PubMed ID
15839596 View in PubMed
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Leptospirosis in the family dog: a public health perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158859
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Feb 12;178(4):399-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-12-2008
Author
Ken Brown
John Prescott
Author Affiliation
Infectious Disease Control Division, York Region Community and Health Services, Newmarket, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Feb 12;178(4):399-401
Date
Feb-12-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Vectors
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dogs - microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Leptospira - immunology - isolation & purification
Leptospirosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Public Health
Notes
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(2):CD00130610796767
Cites: Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 2003 Jul;33(4):791-80712910744
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Mar;12(3):501-316704794
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1984 Feb 23;310(8):497-5006363930
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2003 Dec;3(12):757-7114652202
PubMed ID
18268265 View in PubMed
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Physicians' perceptions of integration in three Western Canada Health Regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171734
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(3):18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Olive H Triska
John Church
Douglas Wilson
Rick Roger
Robert Johnston
Ken Brown
Tom W Noseworthy
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(3):18-24
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Canada
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Male
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
Over the post decade, provincial governments have embarked on ambitious plans to better integrate their healthcare systems, through the introduction of regional governance and management structures. The objective of this study was to examine physicians' perceptions of the current level and facilitators/barriers to integration in three Western Canada Health Regions. Three approaches to integration were investigated: functional, clinical services, and physician system integration. Physicians perceived that functional integration within each region was questionable. Clinical services were the least integrated approach. Physician system integration was rated highest of the approaches, particularly adherence to clinical practice guidelines usage. Physicians' perspectives of integrated health delivery systems do not appear to be influenced by regional size, maturity, urbanicity or facilities. Facilitators of integration were communication among health professionals and service providers, and using a multi-disciplinary team approach in delivery of healthcare in both regions. Barriers to integration were organizational culture, access to specialists and clinical services, and health information records. On a scale of 1-5, all three regions are at the beginning of an integrated health delivery system. Three global suggestions were provided to further integration of health delivery services: physicians should be involved in decision-making process at the Board level, clinical services should be patient-centred, and physicians endorsed the use of multi-disciplinary teams.
PubMed ID
16323465 View in PubMed
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