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Assessing and treating different suicidal states in a danish outpatient sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108420
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2013;17(3):302-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Christopher D Corona
David A Jobes
Ann C Nielsen
Christian M Pedersen
Keith W Jennings
René M Lento
Katherine A Brazaitis
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064, USA. 18corona@cardinalmail.cua.edu
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2013;17(3):302-12
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Risk Assessment - methods
Self Report
Suicidal ideation
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The studies presented compare two methodologies for categorizing suicidal patients based on clinical data. Discussion follows regarding implications for risk assessment and treatment. In these studies, 52 outpatient subjects were placed into different groups based on coding their "suicidal motivation" (Study 1) and their "internal struggle" ratings (Study 2) using data collected at intake. Self-report ratings of 6 Suicide Status Form (SSF) Core Constructs (Psychological Pain, Stress, Agitation, Hopelessness, Self-Hate, and Overall Risk of Suicide) recorded both at intake and at completion of treatment were then compared to determine differences in Core Construct ratings among groups at different time points. In Study 1, overall differences among motivation groups (Life-motivated, Ambivalent, and Death-motivated) were significant for ratings at treatment completion of Overall Risk of Suicide, Self-Hate, and Psychological Pain. In Study 2, overall differences among groups (Wish to live, Ambivalent, and Wish to die) were significant for ratings at intake of Overall Risk of Suicide. At completion of treatment, overall differences among groups were significant for ratings of Overall Risk of Suicide, Hopelessness, and Self-Hate. In addition, significant interactions were found between test time and group for Overall Risk of Suicide and Self-Hate. Results suggest that categorizing suicidal patients by motivation and by the nature of their internal struggle could be beneficial to differential risk assessment with implications for clinical treatment.
PubMed ID
23889578 View in PubMed
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