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Timing of depressive symptom onset and in-hospital complications among acute coronary syndrome inpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142524
Source
Psychosomatics. 2010 Jul-Aug;51(4):283-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Keerat Grewal
Donna E Stewart
Susan E Abbey
Yvonne W Leung
Jane Irvine
Sherry L Grace
Author Affiliation
York University, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Psychosomatics. 2010 Jul-Aug;51(4):283-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Heart Arrest - epidemiology - psychology
Hospitalization
Humans
Inpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk factors
Abstract
Recent research has reported an association between in-hospital depression and poorer long-term prognosis and a greater risk of in-hospital complications.
The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between past and incident depressive symptoms and in-hospital complications in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) inpatients.
A group of 906 ACS inpatients from 12 coronary-care units participated in the study. Incident depressive symptoms were assessed through the Beck Depression Inventory, and participants' were asked about past history of prolonged depressed mood. In-hospital complications were noted as present or absent by nurses, and authors conducted logistic-regression analyses.
A subset of 492 patients (58.4%) experienced an in-hospital complication, the most common being ischemia (48.8%) and cardiac arrest (7.2%). After adjusting for prognostic indicators, incident and past-combined-with-incident depressive symptoms were significantly associated with an increased risk of experiencing an in-hospital complication.
Incident symptoms, in particular, seem to be prognostic. This finding suggests that acute emotions may be triggering cardiac complications, and early identification of emotional symptoms is warranted.
PubMed ID
20587755 View in PubMed
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