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Advanced sleep-wake rhythm in adults born prematurely: confirmation by actigraphy-based assessment in the Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262758
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Johan Björkqvist
Juulia Paavonen
Sture Andersson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Jari Lahti
Kati Heinonen
Johan Eriksson
Katri Räikkönen
Petteri Hovi
Eero Kajantie
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1101-6
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - diagnosis - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested a propensity towards morningness in teenagers and adults born preterm. We set out to study sleep in a subsample from The Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults cohort, with emphasis on sleep timing, duration, and quality. We compared young adults who were born prematurely at very low birth weight (VLBW;?
PubMed ID
24980065 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory blood pressure in young adults with very low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148247
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Petteri Hovi
Sture Andersson
Katri Räikkönen
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Riikka Pyhälä
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. petteri.hovi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
We hypothesized that, as compared with a matched control group born at term, young adults with very low birth weight (VLBW
PubMed ID
19796771 View in PubMed
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Associations between early life stress, self-reported traumatic experiences across the lifespan and leukocyte telomere length in elderly adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258158
Source
Biol Psychol. 2014 Mar;97:35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Katri Savolainen
Johan G Eriksson
Laura Kananen
Eero Kajantie
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Katri Räikkönen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: katri.savolainen@helsinki.fi.
Source
Biol Psychol. 2014 Mar;97:35-42
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety, Separation - psychology
Biological Markers
Cell Aging
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
DNA - genetics
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Parents
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Stress, Psychological - genetics
Telomere - ultrastructure
Telomere Shortening - physiology
War
Wounds and Injuries - psychology
Abstract
Early life stress (ELS) poses a risk for mental disorders and aging-related diseases. Accelerated biological aging, reflected in shorter leukocyte telomere length (LTL), may underlie these risks. We examined whether objectively recorded ELS and retrospectively self-reported traumatic experiences across the lifespan are associated with LTL in later adulthood. Of 1486 participants, 215 had been exposed to ELS, namely to temporary separation from both parents in childhood. Participants self-reported emotionally or physically traumatic experiences across the lifespan at a mean age of 63.2 years. LTL was measured using a quantitative PCR method at a mean age of 61.5 years. Separation or self-reported traumatic experiences were not associated with LTL. However, separated participants who self-reported traumatic experiences had shorter LTL. Our results suggest that while ELS or self-reported traumatic experiences are not per se associated with LTL measured decades later, ELS may in combination with self-reported traumatic events be associated with accelerated biological aging.
PubMed ID
24530884 View in PubMed
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Associations of antenatal glucocorticoid exposure with mental health in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309662
Source
Psychol Med. 2020 01; 50(2):247-257
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2020
Author
Elina Wolford
Marius Lahti-Pulkkinen
Polina Girchenko
Jari Lipsanen
Soile Tuovinen
Jari Lahti
Kati Heinonen
Esa Hämäläinen
Eero Kajantie
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Pia M Villa
Hannele Laivuori
Rebecca M Reynolds
Katri Räikkönen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Psychol Med. 2020 01; 50(2):247-257
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Betamethasone - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Child Behavior Disorders - chemically induced
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Glucocorticoids - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - chemically induced
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Abstract
Synthetic glucocorticoids, to enhance fetal maturation, are a standard treatment when preterm birth before 34 gestational weeks is imminent. While morbidity- and mortality-related benefits may outweigh potential neurodevelopmental harms in children born preterm (
PubMed ID
30688183 View in PubMed
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Behavioural symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in preterm and term children born small and appropriate for gestational age: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138618
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2010;10:91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kati Heinonen
Katri Räikkönen
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Sture Andersson
Eero Kajantie
Johan G Eriksson
Dieter Wolke
Aulikki Lano
Author Affiliation
Institute of Behavioral Science, P.O. Box 9, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. kati.heinonen@helsinki.fi
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2010;10:91
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Abstract
It remains unclear whether it is more detrimental to be born too early or too small in relation to symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Thus, we tested whether preterm birth and small body size at birth adjusted for gestational age are independently associated with symptoms of ADHD in children.
A longitudinal regional birth cohort study comprising 1535 live-born infants between 03/15/1985 and 03/14/1986 admitted to the neonatal wards and 658 randomly recruited non-admitted infants, in Finland. The present study sample comprised 828 children followed up to 56 months. The association between birth status and parent-rated ADHD symptoms of the child was analysed with multiple linear and logistic regression analyses.
Neither prematurity (birth
Notes
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PubMed ID
21159164 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body size at birth and socio-economic status in childhood: implications for Cloninger's psychobiological model of temperament at age 60.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156541
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2008 Aug 15;160(2):167-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2008
Author
Jari Lahti
Katri Räikkönen
Kati Heinonen
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Eero Kajantie
Tom Forsén
Clive Osmond
David J P Barker
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. jari.lahti@helsinki.fi
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2008 Aug 15;160(2):167-74
Date
Aug-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Adult
Age Factors
Aging - physiology - psychology
Birth weight
Body Size - physiology
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn - growth & development
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Social Class
Temperament - physiology
Abstract
Small birth size predicts various psychiatric outcomes, including depression. While biologically based temperamental traits may constitute a vulnerability factor for depression, the extent to which birth size predicts these traits in adulthood is not known. We studied, in 1369 women and men identified from a cohort born in 1934-44 in Helsinki, Finland, whether birth size predicts the temperamental traits measured with Cloninger's Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire at an average age of 63 years. Moreover, we examined whether socio-economic status (SES) in childhood modified the associations. Data on birth size were obtained from birth records, and SES in childhood was obtained from school records. Weight and length at birth showed curvilinear, reverse J-shaped effects on harm avoidance (HA), such that the highest HA scores were most characteristic of those born small. Furthermore, high HA was confined to those belonging to a low SES group in childhood regardless of birth size, and to those belonging to the high SES group in childhood if their birth size was small. The associations were independent of several confounders. Since small birth size as well as high HA in adulthood may associate with subsequent depression, our findings might shed light on understanding the early neurodevelopmental processes that predispose to depression through vulnerability characteristics.
PubMed ID
18573541 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular health of Finnish war evacuees 60 years later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155551
Source
Ann Med. 2009;41(1):66-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Hanna Alastalo
Katri Raikkonen
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Clive Osmond
David J P Barker
Eero Kajantie
Kati Heinonen
Tom J Forsen
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Ann Med. 2009;41(1):66-72
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety, Separation - epidemiology - psychology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Maternal Deprivation
Middle Aged
Paternal Deprivation
Prevalence
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - psychology
Time Factors
World War II
Abstract
Early life experiences might have long-term effects on health.
To assess prevalence of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in later life among individuals exposed to traumatic separation in early childhood due to World War II.
Of the participants of the Helsinki Birth Cohort 1934-44 Study (n=2003), 320 had been evacuated abroad to temporary foster care in childhood. The remaining participants served as controls. The mean age at evacuation was 4.8 (SD=2.4) years and the mean duration of the evacuation was 1.7 (SD=1.0) years.
Cardiovascular morbidity was higher among the former war evacuees (14.7% versus 7.9%; odds ratio (OR)=2.0, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.4-2.9; P
PubMed ID
18720095 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Finnish men and women separated temporarily from their parents in childhood--a life course study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122922
Source
Psychosom Med. 2012 Jul-Aug;74(6):583-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hanna Alastalo
Katri Räikkönen
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Clive Osmond
David J P Barker
Kati Heinonen
Eero Kajantie
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, Helsinki, Finland. hanna.alastalo@thl.fi
Source
Psychosom Med. 2012 Jul-Aug;74(6):583-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Maternal Deprivation
Morbidity
Paternal Deprivation
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
World War II
Abstract
Early-life stress may influence health later in life. We examined morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease over 60 years in individuals separated temporarily from their parents in childhood due to World War II.
We studied 12,915 members of the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study born from 1934 to 1944, of whom 1726 (13.4%) had been evacuated aboard without their parents to temporary foster families for an average of 1.8 (standard deviation = 1.1) years at an average age of 4.6 (standard deviation = 2.4) years. Data on parental separations were extracted from the Finnish National Archives. Information on use of medication for coronary heart disease and hypertension was derived from the National Register of Medication Reimbursement, and information on coronary events, stroke, and cardiovascular deaths was derived from Finnish Hospital Discharge Register and Causes of Death Register between Years 1971 and 2003.
Participants who were separated in childhood used medications for coronary heart disease more frequently than those who were not separated (7.2% versus 4.5%, respectively; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04-1.59; p = .02). No associations between separation and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.90-1.20) or cardiovascular mortality (HR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.72-1.21) or hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease or stroke were observed.
Early-life stress may possibly be a factor predisposing to coronary heart disease decades later, but no evidence was found for increased risk of hospitalizations or mortality.
PubMed ID
22753626 View in PubMed
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Childhood roots of adulthood hostility: family factors as predictors of cognitive and affective hostility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182443
Source
Child Dev. 2003 Nov-Dec;74(6):1751-68
Publication Type
Article
Author
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Kati Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland. liisa.keltikangas-jarvinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Child Dev. 2003 Nov-Dec;74(6):1751-68
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affect
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Cognition
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - psychology
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hostility
Humans
Irritable Mood
Parents - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Personality Development
Risk factors
Socialization
Socioeconomic Factors
Type A Personality
Abstract
Childhood predictors of adulthood hostility was examined in a population-based sample of 1,004 children and their parents. Parents' Type A behavior, their life satisfaction, family's socioeconomic level, and maternal reports of children's Type A behavior were obtained for 6-, 9-, and 12-year-old participants. Hostility was self-evaluated by these participants 15 years later. Results revealed that childhood environment in terms of parental Type A behavior and life dissatisfaction as well as children's own Type A behavior predicted their adulthood hostility. The findings identified childhood environments that either promoted or protected against hostility. Results underline the need to consider the conjoint effects of various factors because the same characteristics play different roles in different contexts.
PubMed ID
14669894 View in PubMed
Less detail

55 records – page 1 of 6.