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Organizational capacity for community development in regional health authorities: a conceptual model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178874
Source
Health Promot Int. 2004 Sep;19(3):289-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Kathy Germann
Doug Wilson
Author Affiliation
School of Business, Department of Strategic Management and Organization, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2R7. kgermann@ualberta.ca
Source
Health Promot Int. 2004 Sep;19(3):289-98
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Networks - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation - methods
Government Agencies - organization & administration
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Models, organizational
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Abstract
The value of community development (CD) practices is well documented in the health promotion literature; it is a foundational strategy outlined in the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. Despite the importance of collaborative action with communities to enhance individual and community health and well-being, there exists a major gap between the evidence for CD and the actual extent to which CD is carried out by health organizations. In this paper it is argued that the gap exists because we have failed to turn the evaluative gaze inward-to examine the capacity of health organizations themselves to facilitate CD processes. This study was designed to explicate key elements that contribute to organizational capacity for community development (OC-CD). Twenty-two front-line CD workers and managers responsible for CD initiatives from five regional health authorities in Alberta, Canada, were interviewed. Based on the study findings, a multidimensional model for conceptualizing OC-CD is presented. Central to the model are four inter-related dimensions: (i) organizational commitment to CD, rooted in particular values and beliefs, leadership and shared understanding of CD; (ii) supportive structures and systems, such as job design, flexible planning processes, evaluation mechanisms and collaborative processes; (iii) allocation of resources for CD; and (iv) working relationships and processes that model CD within the health organization. These four dimensions contribute to successful CD practice in numerous ways, but perhaps most importantly by supporting the empowerment and autonomy of the pivotal organizational player in health promotion practice: the front-line worker.
PubMed ID
15306613 View in PubMed
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Challenges and leadership strategies for managers of nurse practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182609
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Nov;11(6):396-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Trish Reay
Karen Golden-Biddle
Kathy Germann
Author Affiliation
School of Business, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. trish.reay@ualberta.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Nov;11(6):396-403
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Leadership
Models, Nursing
Needs Assessment
Nurse Administrators - education - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse Practitioners - education - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing, Supervisory - organization & administration
Organizational Innovation
Professional Autonomy
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to report on the findings from our research into the recent introduction of nurse practitioners in Alberta, Canada. Through an organizational research perspective, we identify the critical role of health care managers in developing a sustainable nurse practitioner role.
Previous literature has focused on nurse practitioners themselves as the key factor in their integration into the health care system. Although they are qualified and organizationally well placed, managers of nurse practitioners have been overlooked as a critical part of implementation strategies.
We interviewed 25 nurse practitioners and seven of their managers. Through our data analysis we identified three major challenges for managers: (1) clarifying the reallocation of tasks; (2) managing altered working relationships within the team; (3) continuing to manage the team in an evolving situation. Associated with these challenges, we propose leadership strategies that managers may find useful as they work through the consequences of introducing the nurse practitioner role. These strategies are: * encourage all team members to sort out 'who does what'; * ensure that task reallocation preserves job motivating properties; * give consideration to how tasks have been allocated when issues identified as 'personal conflict' arise; * pay attention to all perspectives of the working relationships within the team; * facilitate positive relationships between team members; * lead from a 'balcony' perspective; * work with the team to develop goals that are not over focused on the nurse practitioner; * regularly share with other managers the experiences and lessons learned in introducing nurse practitioners.
For managers to be most effective, they need to address three challenges that are of a managerial, not clinical, nature. By implementing specific leadership strategies, managers of nurse practitioners can facilitate the introduction of the new role and improve its sustainability in health organizations.
PubMed ID
14641721 View in PubMed
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A Conceptual Framework of Organizational Capacity for Public Health Equity Action (OC-PHEA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112504
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 May-Jun;104(3):e262-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Benita E Cohen
Annette Schultz
Elizabeth McGibbon
Madine VanderPlaat
Raewyn Bassett
Kathy GermAnn
Hope Beanlands
Lesley Anne Fuga
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. benita.cohen@ad.umanitoba.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 May-Jun;104(3):e262-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Capacity Building - organization & administration
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Models, organizational
Public Health Practice
Social Justice
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
The Canadian public health sector's foundational values of social justice and equity, and its mandate to promote population health, make it ideally situated to take a strong lead in addressing persistent and unacceptable inequities in health between socially disadvantaged, marginalized or excluded groups and the general population. There is currently much attention paid to improving understanding of pathways to health equity and development of effective population health interventions to reduce health inequities. Strengthening the capacity of the public health sector to develop, implement and sustain equity-focused population health initiatives - including readiness to engage in a social justice-based equity framework for public health - is an equally essential area that has received less attention. Unfortunately, there is evidence that current capacity of the Canadian public health sector to address inequities is highly variable. The first step in developing a sustained approach to improving capacity for health equity action is the identification of what this type of capacity entails. This paper outlines a Conceptual Framework of Organizational Capacity for Public Health Equity Action (OC-PHEA), grounded in the experience of Canadian public health equity champions, that can guide research, dialogue, reflection and action on public health capacity development to achieve health equity goals.
PubMed ID
23823893 View in PubMed
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