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Appropriate calcium fortification of the food supply presents a challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184684
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jul;133(7):2232-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Louise Johnson-Down
Mary R L'Abbé
Nora S Lee
Katherine Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Ste Anne de Bellevue, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jul;133(7):2232-8
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Calcium - administration & dosage
Canada
Food Supply
Food, Fortified
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Abstract
Fortification with calcium to increase dietary intakes of this mineral is currently under evaluation in Canada. To model the potential dietary consequences of food fortification, data from a large national survey of Canadians (n = 1543) were used. Food fortification scenarios were based on reference amounts for labeling requirements. Consumption of milk, cheese and other dairy products was associated with high calcium intakes, and there was a low prevalence of inadequacy in men
PubMed ID
12840185 View in PubMed
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Association between cigarette smoking and C-reactive protein in a representative, population-based sample of adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158432
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2008 Mar;10(3):525-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Jennifer O'Loughlin
Marie Lambert
Igor Karp
Jennifer McGrath
Katherine Gray-Donald
Tracie A Barnett
Edgard E Delvin
Emile Levy
Gilles Paradis
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montréal, CRCHUM, Montréal. jennifer.oloughlin@umontreal.ca
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2008 Mar;10(3):525-32
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Attitude to Health
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Smoking - blood
Abstract
Although related to inflammatory markers in adults, little is known about the association between cigarette smoking and C-reactive protein (CRP) in adolescent smokers. We examined the association between high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) concentrations and smoking in youth. We used data from a cross-sectional, province-wide survey of a representative sample of youth conducted in Quebec, Canada, in 1999. Data were collected in self-report questionnaires completed by participants and their parents. Participants provided a fasting blood sample, and anthropometric measures were undertaken by trained technicians. The present analysis pertains to 1,501 adolescents aged 13 and 16 years who completed questionnaires and for whom blood samples were available. The independent association between a six-category indicator of smoking status and elevated hs-CRP, defined as a value at least in the 90th percentile of the age- and sex-specific CRP distribution, was assessed in multiple logistic regression analyses controlling for potential confounders. Relative to never-smokers, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for puffers (i.e., never smoked a whole cigarette), those who smoked but not in the past month, light past-month smokers, moderate past-month smokers, and heavy past-month smokers were 1.04 (0.55-1.98), 1.76 (1.06-2.94), 1.39 (0.70-2.76), 2.07 (0.96-4.42), and 2.40 (1.18-4.88), respectively. Our data suggest a positive association between smoking status and elevated CRP in adolescents, and in particular among heavier past-month smokers. Damage related to cigarette smoking may begin soon after tobacco use initiation, reinforcing the preventive message that no level of smoking is safe in youth.
PubMed ID
18324572 View in PubMed
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Association between fruit and vegetable consumption in mothers and children in low-income, urban neighborhoods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166274
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2007 Oct;34(5):723-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Marie-Pierre Sylvestre
Jennifer O'Loughlin
Katherine Gray-Donald
James Hanley
Gilles Paradis
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. marie-pierre.sylvestre@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2007 Oct;34(5):723-34
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Continental Population Groups
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mothers
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Vegetables
Abstract
To understand factors influencing fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption in children, the authors studied the association between F&V consumption in mothers and children in a sample of 1,106 boys and girls in Grades 4-6 in 24 elementary schools in low-income, multiethnic neighborhoods in Montreal, Canada. Approximately 10% of girls and 19% of boys reported not having eaten any vegetables in the week prior to questionnaire administration; 53% of girls and 63% of boys did not consume whole fruits daily. Each unit increase in F&V consumption in mothers was associated with a 10% to 20% increase in F&V consumption in children. Interventions to improve F&V consumption should aim to improve awareness among parents of the importance of fruits and vegetables and of the impact of their own behavior on their children's F&V consumption.
PubMed ID
17142242 View in PubMed
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Association of nutritional risk and depressive symptoms with physical performance in the elderly: the Quebec longitudinal study of nutrition as a determinant of successful aging (NuAge).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154466
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2008 Aug;27(4):492-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
José Alberto Avila-Funes
Katherine Gray-Donald
Hélène Payette
Author Affiliation
Research Centre on Aging, Health & Social Services Centre - University Institute of Geriatrics of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2008 Aug;27(4):492-8
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Canada
Depression
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Activity
Nutritional Status
Physical Fitness
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
Depressive symptoms and poor nutritional status have been associated with declines in physical capacity. However, it is not clear whether they exert independent effects and potential for interaction among these two variables has not been studied. The purpose of this report is to clarify the relationships between depressive symptoms and nutritional risk and physical capacity.
Baseline data from community-living and well functioning men and women (n = 1,755) participating in the longitudinal study NuAge (Quebec, Canada), aged 67-84 years were used for this study. Physical performance (PP) was defined as the summary score of 4 tests of physical capacity [Standing Balance, Walking Speed, Chair Stands, and Timed "Up &Go"]. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and nutritional risk by the Elderly Nutrition Screening (ENS(c)) tool.
Prevalence of mild depression (GDS score >or=11 and
PubMed ID
18978169 View in PubMed
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Associations between children's diets and features of their residential and school neighbourhood food environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128375
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(9 Suppl 3):eS48-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Andraea Van Hulst
Tracie A Barnett
Lise Gauvin
Mark Daniel
Yan Kestens
Madeleine Bird
Katherine Gray-Donald
Marie Lambert
Author Affiliation
École de santé publique, Université de Montréal; Centre de recherche du CHU Sainte-Justine. a.van.hulst@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(9 Suppl 3):eS48-54
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Fast Foods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Quebec
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Schools
Abstract
Among studies of the built environment, few examine neighbourhood food environments in relation to children's diets. We examined the associations of residential and school neighbourhood access to different types of food establishments with children's diets.
Data from QUALITY (Quebec Adipose and Lifestyle Investigation in Youth), an ongoing study on the natural history of obesity in 630 Quebec youth aged 8-10 years with a parental history of obesity, were analyzed (n=512). Three 24-hour diet recalls were used to assess dietary intake of vegetables and fruit, and sugar-sweetened beverages. Questionnaires were used to determine the frequency of eating/snacking out and consumption of delivered/take-out foods. We characterized residential and school neighbourhood food environments by means of a Geographic Information System. Variables included distance to the nearest supermarket, fast-food restaurant and convenience store, and densities of each food establishment type computed for 1 km network buffers around each child's residence and school. Retail Food Environment indices were also computed. Multivariable logistic regressions (residential access) and generalized estimating equations (school access) were used for analysis.
Residential and school neighbourhood access to supermarkets was not associated with children's diets. Residing in neighbourhoods with lower access to fast-food restaurants and convenience stores was associated with a lower likelihood of eating and snacking out. Children attending schools in neighbourhoods with a higher number of unhealthful relative to healthful food establishments scored most poorly on dietary outcomes.
Further investigations are needed to inform policies aimed at shaping neighbourhood-level food purchasing opportunities, particularly for access to fast-food restaurants and convenience stores.
PubMed ID
23618089 View in PubMed
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Blood lead concentrations and iron deficiency in Canadian aboriginal infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58507
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2002 Apr 22;289(1-3):255-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-22-2002
Author
Noreen D Willows
Katherine Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2002 Apr 22;289(1-3):255-60
Date
Apr-22-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - epidemiology - ethnology
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fishes
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant Welfare
Iron - blood
Lead - blood
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Aboriginal Cree infants living in northern Quebec who were 9 months of age were screened for anemia, iron deficiency and elevated blood lead concentrations. Of the 314 infants who were eligible to participate, 274 (87.3%) were screened for anemia, 186 had blood lead concentration measured and 141 of the latter group had iron status determined. The median blood lead concentration was 0.08 micromol/l (range 0.01-1.00 micromol/l). The 25, 50 and 75 percentiles for blood lead concentration were 0.05, 0.08 and 0.12 micromol/l, respectively. The prevalence of elevated blood lead concentrations (> 0.48 micromol/l) was 2.7% (95% Cl 0.36-5.0). Among infants who had blood lead measured, the prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin
PubMed ID
12049403 View in PubMed
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Calcium and vitamin D intakes in an adult Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152269
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2009;70(1):21-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Suzette Poliquin
Lawrence Joseph
Katherine Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
CaMos Coordinating Centre, MUHC Research Institute, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, QC.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2009;70(1):21-7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology
Bone Density Conservation Agents - administration & dosage
Calcium - deficiency
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements
Female
Food
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Requirements
Osteoporosis - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology
Abstract
Calcium and vitamin D intakes from food and supplements were estimated in Canadian men and women.
Calcium intakes from both diet and supplements and vitamin D intakes from fortified milk and supplements were estimated using cross-sectional data from 9423 randomly selected subjects aged 25 years or older, who were participating in a longitudinal study on osteoporosis. Subjects completed an abbreviated food frequency questionnaire administered by a trained interviewer between July 1995 and December 1997.
The mean (standard deviation) daily intake for calcium was estimated to be 1038 (614) mg for women and 904 (583) mg for men; for vitamin D, mean intakes were 5.6 (5.9) microg and 4.8 (5.5) microg for women and men, respectively.
Mean intakes for calcium and vitamin D in men and women under age 51 were close to the adequate daily intake levels. Older adults, however, may be at risk of deficiency.
PubMed ID
19261203 View in PubMed
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Community-based communication strategies to promote infant iron nutrition in northern Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170194
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Feb;65(1):65-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Tanya Verrall
Lily Napash
Lucie Leclerc
Sophie Mercure
Katherine Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Feb;65(1):65-78
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - prevention & control
Communication
Community Networks
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Population Groups
Prospective Studies
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Marketing
Abstract
To evaluate innovative communication strategies promoting iron nutrition for infants at risk for iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in a northern Aboriginal community.
A prospective process evaluation.
A social marketing approach was used in the development, implementation and evaluation of the communication strategies. A post-intervention questionnaire was administered to a sample (n = 45) to evaluate reach and exposure of the strategies, and sales of iron-rich infant foods were examined pre- and post-intervention.
Multiple communication channels were associated with an increased awareness of IDA and an increased self-reported use of iron-rich infant food. Radio was the most successful channel for reach and exposure of messages. Iron-rich infant food sales increased from pre- to post-intervention (p
PubMed ID
16544649 View in PubMed
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Community-based participatory research: lessons from sharing results with the community: Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165881
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2007;1(2):143-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Ann C Macaulay
Amy Ing
Jon Salsberg
Amelia McGregor
Chantal Saad-Haddad
Joyce Rice
Lois Montour
Katherine Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, Canada.
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2007;1(2):143-52
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Based Participatory Research
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Female
Food Habits
Health promotion
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Risk Reduction Behavior
Schools
Abstract
Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Project (KSDPP) is an ongoing, community-based participatory research project with an Aboriginal community in Canada, promoting healthy lifestyles to prevent type 2 diabetes.
To document lessons learned from sharing results with the community, and analyzing feedback from attendees.
In 2004, a researcher-community team delivered 16 sessions of a contextualized presentation of data collected from 1994 to 2002. The team documented the resulting questions and discussions, attendees completed anonymous questionnaires including open-ended questions, and presenters summarized their impressions.
One hundred eighty-one people attended the presentations and question/discussion periods were summarized. One hundred sixty-two (82%) of attendees (87% female), completed the questionnaires; 99% understood the presentations and 142 (88%) stated they intended to improve their lifestyles. Qualitative analysis of discussions and open-ended comments categorized attendees' comments about KSDPP, the 1994 through 2002 results, the community, and lifestyle habits. Lessons learned included the time needed to develop and make the presentations, the importance of using community knowledge to guide the experience, ways of attracting an audience, difficulty of reaching men, use of feedback from those attending the presentations, and the need to plan prospectively for analyzing attendee feedback.
Community feedback was used to improve interventions and finalize interpretation of the results.
PubMed ID
20208233 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.