Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Adverse perinatal outcomes in 665,244 term and post-term deliveries-a Norwegian population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306640
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2020 Apr; 247:212-218
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2020
Author
Gulim Murzakanova
Sari Räisänen
Anne Flem Jacobsen
Kristina Baker Sole
Lisa Bjarkø
Katariina Laine
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: Gullah@ous-hf.no.
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2020 Apr; 247:212-218
Date
Apr-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, newborn, diseases - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the prevalence and risk of adverse perinatal outcomes in early-term (37+0-38+6 weeks), full-term (39+0-40+6 weeks), late-term (41+0-41+6 weeks), and post-term (>42+0 weeks) deliveries with spontaneous labor onset.
A population-based cohort with data from the Medical Birth Registry Norway (MBRN) and Statistics Norway (SSB) was conducted. The study population consisted of 665,244 women with cephalic singleton live births at term or post-term with spontaneous labor onset during the period of 1999-2014 in Norway. Maternal, obstetric, and fetal characteristics were obtained from the MBRN. Maternal education data were obtained from the SSB. The prevalence rates of adverse perinatal outcomes for each gestational age (GA) group were estimated. Inter-group differences were detected with Chi square tests. Multivariable regression analysis adjusted for maternal age, educational level, smoking, parity, maternal diabetes, and preeclampsia was used to assess adverse outcome prevalence for early- late-, and post-term births compared to full-term births.
Deliveries at early-term were associated with an increased prevalence of neonatal jaundice, polyhydramnios, small for gestational age (SGA) status, respiratory support, and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission compared with deliveries at GAs of 39-43 weeks (p
PubMed ID
32146227 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are obstetric anal sphincter ruptures preventable?-- large and consistent rupture rate variations between the Nordic countries and between delivery units in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120162
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Jan;92(1):94-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Katariina Laine
Wenche Rotvold
Anne Cathrine Staff
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Oslo, Norway. kattiksen@yahoo.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Jan;92(1):94-100
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries
Chi-Square Distribution
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Episiotomy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology
Parity
Pregnancy
Registries
Rupture
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To study changes in the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter rupture (OASR) during recent years in Denmark, Finland, Sweden and Norway and hospital-based incidence in recent years in Norway.
Retrospective birth register study.
Unselected population of delivering women in four Nordic countries.
All deliveries (574 175) registered in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, 2004-2010.
Parity data, including maternal, obstetrical and fetal characteristics, were obtained. The incidence of OASR was calculated from vaginal deliveries. A chi-squared test was used to analyse differences between countries and time periods.
Incidence of OASR.
During the study period, the OASR incidence in Finland was notably lower (0.7-1.0%) than in the other three Nordic countries (4.2-2.3%). A significant and constant reduction in OASR incidence was observed in Norway only (from 4.1 to 2.3%, from 2004 to 2010, p
PubMed ID
23034015 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association of maternal country of birth and education with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy: A population-based study of 960 516 deliveries in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299004
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Oct; 97(10):1237-1247
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Kristina Baker Sole
Anne Cathrine Staff
Katariina Laine
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Oct; 97(10):1237-1247
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Norway
Pre-Eclampsia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk - ethnology
Pregnant Women - ethnology
Risk factors
Abstract
Previous studies estimating the association of maternal country of birth and education with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) have shown conflicting results. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of HDP and estimate the association of maternal country of birth and education level with preeclampsia/eclampsia and gestational hypertension in Norway.
We performed a population-based observational cohort study linking two population datasets: The Medical Birth Registry of Norway and Statistics Norway (SSB). Singleton deliveries in Norway between 1999 and 2014 (907 048 deliveries) were stratified by parity. Multiple regression analysis was performed.
In 20% of the deliveries the woman was born outside of Norway. Foreign-born women had lower risk of preeclampsia/eclampsia and gestational hypertension compared with Norwegian-born women. High education reduced the risk for preeclampsia/eclampsia by 34% (adjusted odds ratio 0.66, 95% CI 0.62-0.69), compared with women with secondary education among nulliparous women, and by 39% (adjusted odds ratio 0.61, 95% CI 0.57-0.65) among parous women. Poorly educated women had no increased risk of HDP compared with women with secondary education. Among highly educated nulliparous women the risk of preeclampsia/eclampsia was lower but the risk of gestational hypertension higher compared with women of similar parity with secondary education. Adjustment for confounding variables had minimal effect on these estimates.
Maternal country of birth and education were associated with HDP. Women with higher education had the lowest risk of HDP, and Norwegian-born women had the highest risk of HDP, regardless of parity and other confounding factors.
PubMed ID
29873810 View in PubMed
Less detail

Many sphincter injuries are preventable.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118877
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Nov 12;132(21):2364-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-12-2012
Author
Annetine Staff
Katariina Laine
Author Affiliation
Women and Children's Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. annetine.staff@ous-hf.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Nov 12;132(21):2364-5
Date
Nov-12-2012
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anal Canal - injuries
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects - methods
Episiotomy
Fecal Incontinence - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Rupture - epidemiology - prevention & control
PubMed ID
23160583 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence and risk factors for anal incontinence after obstetric anal sphincter rupture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137193
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2011 Apr;90(4):319-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Katariina Laine
Finn Egil Skjeldestad
Birgitte Sanda
Hildegunn Horne
Anny Spydslaug
Anne Cathrine Staff
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Department of Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo University Hospital Ullevål, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. kattiksen@yahoo.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2011 Apr;90(4):319-24
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries - surgery
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects
Fecal Incontinence - epidemiology - etiology - ultrasonography
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Rupture - surgery
Young Adult
Abstract
To study prevalence and risk factors for anal incontinence (AI) after obstetric anal sphincter rupture.
This was a retrospective clinical observational study. Among 14 959 vaginal deliveries, 591 women were diagnosed with obstetric anal sphincter ruptures (3.9%) at one Norwegian University Hospital in 2003-2005. Patients were examined and interviewed approximately 10 months after delivery. Anal continence was classified with St. Mark's incontinence score (0, complete anal continence; =3, anal incontinence), and defects in anal sphincter muscles were diagnosed by endoanal ultrasound. Prevalence of anal incontinence was assessed in relation to obstetrical and maternal characteristics as well as the correlation between anal incontinence and ultrasound-detectable defects of sphincter muscle.
Anal incontinence with a St. Mark's score of =3 was reported by 21% of women with obstetric anal sphincter rupture, with inability to control gas as the most prevalent symptom. Women with AI were more likely to report urinary incontinence compared with women having no AI. In a multiple regression analysis of maternal and obstetrical risk factors, fourth degree sphincter tear was the only significant risk factor for AI. Anal incontinence was more frequent in patients diagnosed with than without ultrasound-identified anal sphincter muscle defects at 10 months postpartum follow-up.
Anal as well as urinary incontinence after delivery with obstetric anal sphincter rupture is common, and prenatal obstetric and maternal variables could not predict anal incontinence. Fourth degree perineal tear and a persistent ultrasound-detected defect in the anal sphincter muscles are associated with AI.
PubMed ID
21306321 View in PubMed
Less detail