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Active and passive distraction in children undergoing wound dressings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122420
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2013 Apr;28(2):158-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Stefan Nilsson
Karin Enskär
Carina Hallqvist
Eva Kokinsky
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, Borås University, Borås, Sweden. stefan_r.nilsson@hb.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2013 Apr;28(2):158-66
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bandages - adverse effects
Candy
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Pain - etiology - prevention & control
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Sweden
Video Games
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test how distraction influences pain, distress and anxiety in children during wound care. Sixty participants aged 5-12 years were randomized to three groups: serious gaming, the use of lollipops and a control group. Self-reported pain, distress, anxiety and observed pain behaviour were recorded in conjunction with wound care. Serious gaming, an active distraction, reduced the observed pain behaviour and self-reported distress compared with the other groups. A sense of control and engagement in the distraction, together, may be the explanation for the different pain behaviours when children use serious gaming.
PubMed ID
22819747 View in PubMed
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Adolescent and young adult cancer survivors' perceptions of participating in a survey - Ethical and methodological considerations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299702
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2019 Apr; 39:55-61
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Maria Olsson
Gunnar Steineck
Karin Enskär
Ulrica Wilderäng
Marianne Jarfelt
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Paediatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, S-416 85, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: maria.a.olsson@vgregion.se.
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2019 Apr; 39:55-61
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cancer Survivors - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Patient Participation - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to understand patient-reported perception of participation in a population-based web-survey focusing on sensitive issues for adolescent and young adult cancer survivors.
A population-based web survey for adolescent and young adult cancer survivors including a matched control group. Adolescent and young adult cancer survivors from the population-based Swedish National Cancer Registry from four of the six register holders at Regional Cancer Centers in Sweden. Controls were randomly identified from the Swedish National Population registry, from the same register holders.
Of 729 eligible participants, 540 completed the survey i.e. 74% participation rate. The study population included 285 adolescent and young adult cancer survivors and 255 matched controls. None of the participants answered that the survey had a very negative impact on them and a minority of 43 (7.9%) of the 540 responded that they were mildly negatively affected by their participation in the study. There was a no significant difference between patients and controls regarding the negative effect of the participation (p?=?0.29). Positive experiences of participating in the study were widely expressed and most participants (95%) found the study valuable.
These findings suggest that the benefits clearly outweigh the risks when adolescent and young adult cancer survivors participate in surveys including sensitive and trauma-related aspects, given that the study design is ethically sound and participants are approached carefully. We also present a modified ethical protocol for epidemiological surveys on adolescents and young adult cancer survivors.
PubMed ID
30850139 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' and school nurses' perceptions of using a health and lifestyle tool in health dialogues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132998
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2011 Sep;20(17-18):2573-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Marie Golsäter
Birgitta Sidenvall
Hans Lingfors
Karin Enskär
Author Affiliation
CHILD Research Group, Research School of Health and Welfare, School of Health Science, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden. marie.golsater@hhj.hj.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2011 Sep;20(17-18):2573-83
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Focus Groups
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Nurses - psychology
School Nursing - manpower
Sweden
Abstract
To describe and explore adolescents' and nurses' perceptions of using a health and lifestyle tool in health dialogues in the School Health Service.
In Sweden, dialogues concerning health and lifestyle are offered to adolescents aged 14 years with the purpose of encouraging an interest in a healthy lifestyle. A health and lifestyle tool including a health questionnaire and a health profile has recently been developed, with the aim of facilitating the communication about health and lifestyle in these dialogues.
Qualitative descriptive design.
Twenty-nine adolescents and 23 nurses participated in focus group interviews, which were subjected to qualitative content analysis.
The health and lifestyle tool was perceived as constituting a structure for the dialogues and as a clear and applicable starting point, focusing on individual aspects. The tool contributed to an understanding of the health situation and to the transmittal of health information on an individual as well as a group level.
The tool was perceived as constituting a useful structure for the dialogues about health and lifestyle. When it was used the individual's health and lifestyle were concretised, which opened up for a dialogue and different aspects of health and lifestyle were detected. However, in some cases the outcome of the tool could be conceived as a stringent assessment and thereby complicate the dialogues.
The use of a tool, such as the one used in this study, is one way to improve the dialogues in the School Health Service, allowing them to be more focused on the individual's needs and to detect aspects that would otherwise not be so easily detected. The implications of this study include using the findings to guide counselling sessions in the schools and other health care settings.
PubMed ID
21752132 View in PubMed
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An Analytic Review of Clinical Implications From Nursing and Psychosocial Research Within Swedish Pediatric Oncology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278804
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2015 Jul-Aug;30(4):550-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Karin Enskär
Karina Huus
Maria Björk
Mats Granlund
Laura Darcy
Susanne Knutsson
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2015 Jul-Aug;30(4):550-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Evidence-Based Nursing
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Research
Oncology Nursing
Pediatric Nursing
Power (Psychology)
Quality Improvement
Quality of Health Care
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze researchers' suggestions for clinical implications of their findings as stated in recent published articles on nursing and psychosocial research within the setting of Swedish pediatric oncology. Identified categories included staff awareness of the effects of child illness on families; systems for care improvement; provision of quality of care, education and support; and empowerment of children and families. In order to be able to realize these clinical suggestions, expanded research is needed as well as continued education and support for staff.
PubMed ID
25448474 View in PubMed
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Are children as relatives our responsibility? - How nurses perceive their role in caring for children as relatives of seriously ill patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280798
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2016 Dec;25:33-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Marie Golsäter
Maria Henricson
Karin Enskär
Susanne Knutsson
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2016 Dec;25:33-39
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Child, Preschool
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Care - psychology
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to elucidate how nurses perceive their role in caring for children as relatives to a parent with a serious physical illness.
A qualitative explorative design with focus group interviews was used. In total, 22 nurses working at one neurological, one haematological and two oncological wards were interviewed. The transcripts from the interviews were analysed in steps in accordance with inductive qualitative content analysis.
This study revealed six variations in how nurses perceived their role in the encounter with child relatives, ranging from being convinced that it is not their responsibility to being aware of the children's situation and working systematically to support them.
Nurses should consider whether their patients have children who might be affected by their parent's illness. The nurses' self-confidence when meeting these children must be increased by education in order to strengthen their professional role. Furthermore, guidelines on how to encounter child relatives are required.
PubMed ID
27865250 View in PubMed
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Being an expert nurse in pediatric oncology care: nurses' descriptions in narratives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123902
Source
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2012 May-Jun;29(3):151-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Karin Enskär
Author Affiliation
Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden. karin.enskar@hhj.hj.se
Source
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2012 May-Jun;29(3):151-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Clinical Competence
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Narration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Oncology Nursing - education
Pediatric Nursing - education
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Pediatric oncology has become a highly specialized area, and the transition from novice nurse to expert can be complicated. The aim of this study was to describe the perceptions of nurses in pediatric oncology regarding the role of an expert nurse in pediatric oncology. Nurses (n = 66) working in pediatric oncology participated by writing their narratives. The data were analyzed by means of content analysis, and 3 categories were found: an expert has confidence in his or her knowledge, an expert provides high-quality care, and an expert is given possibilities for professional growth. It can be concluded that when nurses are given possibilities for continuous education and reflection, and have a feeling of satisfaction at being able to fulfill a child and his or her family's needs, this enhances their possibility to become experts and maintain expert competence.
PubMed ID
22647727 View in PubMed
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Comparing children's self-report instruments for health-related quality of life using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114170
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2013;11:75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Christina Petersson
Rune J Simeonsson
Karin Enskar
Karina Huus
Author Affiliation
Jonkoping University, The Jonkoping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Box 1026, s-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden. christina.peterson@hhj.hj.se
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2013;11:75
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Disabled Children
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Population Surveillance - methods
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Registries
Self Report - standards
Sweden
Abstract
Children with chronic conditions often experience a long treatment which can be complex and negatively impacts the child's well-being. In planning treatment and interventions for children with chronic conditions, it is important to measure health-related quality of life (HrQoL). HrQoL instruments are considered to be a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) and should be used in routine practice.
The aim of this study was to compare the content dimensions of HrQoL instruments for children's self-reports using the framework of ICF-CY.
The sample consist of six instruments for health-related quality of life for children 5 to 18 years of age, which was used in the Swedish national quality registries for children and adolescents with chronic conditions. The following instruments were included: CHQ-CF, DCGM-37, EQ-5D-Y, KIDSCREEN-52, Kid-KINDL and PedsQL 4.0. The framework of the ICF-CY was used as the basis for the comparison.
There were 290 meaningful concepts identified and linked to 88 categories in the classification ICF-CY with 29 categories of the component body functions, 48 categories of the component activities and participation and 11 categories of the component environmental factors. No concept were linked to the component body structures. The comparison revealed that the items in the HrQoL instruments corresponded primarily with the domains of activities and less with environmental factors.
In conclusion, the results confirm that ICF-CY provide a good framework for content comparisons that evaluate similarities and differences to ICF-CY categories. The results of this study revealed the need for greater consensus of content across different HrQoL instruments. To obtain a detailed description of children's HrQoL, DCGM-37 and KIDSCREEN-52 may be appropriate instruments to use that can increase the understanding of young patients' needs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23642162 View in PubMed
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Confidence and authority through new knowledge: An evaluation of the national educational programme in paediatric oncology nursing in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279806
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2016 Mar;38:68-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Pernilla Pergert
Margareta Af Sandeberg
Nina Andersson
Ildikó Márky
Karin Enskär
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2016 Mar;38:68-73
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses
Oncology Nursing - education
Pediatric Nursing - education
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
There is a lack of nurse specialists in many paediatric hospitals in Sweden. This lack of competence is devastating for childhood cancer care because it is a highly specialised area that demands specialist knowledge. Continuing education of nurses is important to develop nursing practice and also to retain them.
The aim of this study was to evaluate a Swedish national educational programme in paediatric oncology nursing.
The nurses who participated came from all of the six paediatric oncology centres as well as from general paediatric wards. At the time of the evaluation, three groups of registered nurses (n=66) had completed this 2year, part-time educational programme.
A study specific questionnaire, including closed and open-ended questions was sent to the 66 nurses and 54 questionnaires were returned. Answers were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative content analysis.
The results show that almost all the nurses (93%) stayed in paediatric care after the programme. Furthermore, 31% had a position in management or as a consultant nurse after the programme. The vast majority of the nurses (98%) stated that the programme had made them more secure in their work. The nurses were equipped, through education, for paediatric oncology care which included: knowledge generating new knowledge; confidence and authority; national networks and resources. They felt increased confidence in their roles as paediatric oncology nurses as well as authority in their encounters with families and in discussions with co-workers. New networks and resources were appreciated and used in their daily work in paediatric oncology.
The programme was of importance to the career of the individual nurse and also to the quality of care given to families in paediatric oncology. The national educational programme for nurses in Paediatric Oncology Care meets the needs of the highly specialised care.
PubMed ID
26746592 View in PubMed
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Consequences of Needle-Related Medical Procedures: A Hermeneutic Study With Young Children (3-7 Years).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280471
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2016 Mar-Apr;31(2):e109-18
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katarina Karlsson
Ingela Rydström
Maria Nyström
Karin Enskär
Ann-Charlotte Dalheim Englund
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2016 Mar-Apr;31(2):e109-18
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anxiety - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - methods - psychology
Female
Hermeneutics
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Needles - adverse effects
Pain - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Needle-related medical procedures (NRMPs) are often frightening and cause children anxiety and pain. Only a few studies have examined the perspectives of younger children. More knowledge is needed about younger children's experiences in caring situations such as NRMPs.
The aim of this study was to explain and understand the consequences related to NRMPs from younger children's perspectives.
Participant observations and interviews with younger children who had experienced NRMPs were analysed using a lifeworld hermeneutic approach.
Experiencing fear is central for younger children during an NRMP and interpretation of its consequences formed the basis for the following themes: seeking security, realizing the adult's power, struggling for control, feeling ashamed, and surrendering. A comprehensive understanding is presented wherein younger children's experiences of NRMPs vary across time and space related to weakening and strengthening their feelings of fear.
Awareness is needed that adults' power becomes more obvious for children during an NRMP. Children's surrender does not necessarily imply acceptance of the procedure. Providing children with opportunities to control elements of the procedure creates a foundation for active participation, and vice versa.
PubMed ID
26603292 View in PubMed
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The everyday life of the young child shortly after receiving a cancer diagnosis, from both children's and parent's perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271059
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2014 Nov-Dec;37(6):445-56
Publication Type
Article
Author
Laura Darcy
Susanne Knutsson
Karina Huus
Karin Enskar
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2014 Nov-Dec;37(6):445-56
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Neoplasms - diagnosis - nursing - psychology
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Patients - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Providing qualified, evidence-based healthcare to children requires increased knowledge of how cancer affects the young child's life. There is a dearth of research focusing on the young child's experience of everyday life.
The purpose of this study was to explore young children's and their parents' perceptions of how cancer affects the child's health and everyday life shortly after diagnosis.
Thirteen children with newly diagnosed cancer aged 1 to 6 years and their parents, connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Southern Sweden, participated in this study through semistructured interviews. Child and parent data were analyzed as a family unit, using qualitative content analysis.
Everyday life was spent at hospital or at home waiting to go back to hospital. Analysis led to the following categories: feeling like a stranger, feeling powerless, and feeling isolated.
The child wants to be seen as a competent individual requiring information and participation in care. Parents need to be a safe haven for their child and not feel forced to legitimize painful and traumatic procedures by assisting with them. Nurses play a major role in the lives of children. Research with and on the young child is necessary and a way of making them visible and promoting their health and well-being.
Nurses need to reevaluate the newly diagnosed child's care routines so as to shift focus from the illness to the child. This requires competent nurses, secure in their caring role.
PubMed ID
24406380 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.