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Age- and time-dependent changes in cancer incidence among immigrants to Sweden: colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129906
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):E122-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2012
Author
Seyed Mohsen Mousavi
Mahdi Fallah
Kristina Sundquist
Kari Hemminki
Author Affiliation
Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. m.mousavi@dkfz.de
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):E122-8
Date
Jul-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the role of gender, age at immigration and length of stay on incidence trends of common cancers, we studied risk of colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancers in immigrants to Sweden from 1958 to 2008. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to calculate standardized incidence ratios for common cancers among immigrants compared to Swedes. Immigrants were classified into "high-risk" countries when their risk was increased, into "low-risk" when their risk was decreased and into "other" when their risk was nonsignificant. Among those who immigrated at younger age (
PubMed ID
22052616 View in PubMed
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Age at diagnosis and age at death in familial prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98697
Source
Oncologist. 2009 Dec;14(12):1209-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Andreas Brandt
Justo Lorenzo Bermejo
Jan Sundquist
Kari Hemminki
Author Affiliation
Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Centre, Im Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. andreas.brandt@dkfz.de
Source
Oncologist. 2009 Dec;14(12):1209-17
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Family Health
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics - mortality
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: A family history of prostate cancer is associated with a higher risk for prostate cancer to first-degree relatives. If greater surveillance of men at familial risk is considered to be useful, population-based estimates of the differences in the age at diagnosis between familial and sporadic prostate cancer cases are needed. METHODS: The men in the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database were classified according to the number and type of affected first-degree relatives (father or brother) and according to the relative's age at diagnosis. The cumulative incidence of prostate cancer and cumulative prostate cancer-specific mortality were estimated using a stratified Cox model. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence was highest for men with multiple affected first-degree relatives, and it was higher for brothers than for sons of prostate cancer patients. The age to reach the same cumulative incidence as the general population at age 55 years decreased with decreasing age at diagnosis of the relative, ranging from 48.7 years (father diagnosed before 60 years of age) to 53.7 years (father diagnosed after 82 years of age). Prostate cancer-specific mortality was also related to the number and type of affected relatives but there was no clear evidence for a dependency on the age at diagnosis of the relative. CONCLUSIONS: Men with a father or a brother affected by prostate cancer are diagnosed and die at earlier ages than men without a family history of prostate cancer. This study should encourage further analysis in order to assess the risks and benefits of screening for prostate cancer in men at higher risk.
PubMed ID
19939895 View in PubMed
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Age-Dependent Metastatic Spread and Survival: Cancer of Unknown Primary as a Model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279776
Source
Sci Rep. 2016 Mar 24;6:23725
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-24-2016
Author
Kari Hemminki
Nicholas Pavlidis
Konstantinos K Tsilidis
Kristina Sundquist
Jianguang Ji
Source
Sci Rep. 2016 Mar 24;6:23725
Date
Mar-24-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasms, Unknown Primary - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In order to describe a novel approach for the clinical study of metastases, we provide here age-specific incidence and survival data for cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Metastases in various organs are found at CUP diagnosis, which have implications for prognosis, and we hypothesize similar prognostic implications for metastases found at diagnosis of primary cancers. We identified 33,224 CUP patients from the Swedish Cancer Registry and calculated incidence rates (IRs) for CUP development. Cox proportional hazards regression models were performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for relative survival in CUP patients compared to the general population. In age-group specific analyses, a maximal IR was reached at age 85-89 years, followed by a marked decline to age 90+ (7-fold in men and 3-fold in women). The overall HR for relative survival declined systematically by age. CUP may be applied as an epidemiological age-incidence model for cancer metastases providing evidence in line with autopsy data that the metastatic potential, as shown by the incidence of CUP, appears to weaken markedly at age 85 years, depending on metastatic locations. The relative death rates were highest among young patients, which was probably entirely due to the low death rates in young background population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27009354 View in PubMed
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Age specific and attributable risks of familial prostate carcinoma from the family-cancer database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18901
Source
Cancer. 2002 Sep 15;95(6):1346-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2002
Author
Kari Hemminki
Kamila Czene
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Cancer. 2002 Sep 15;95(6):1346-53
Date
Sep-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Databases, Factual
Family
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Neoplasms - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Familial risks by proband status and age are useful for clinical counseling, and they can be used to calculate population-attributable fractions (PAFs), which show the proportion of disease that could be prevented if the cause could be removed. METHODS: The authors used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database on 10.2 million individuals and 182,104 fathers and 3710 sons with medically verified prostate carcinoma to calculate age specific familial standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) and familial PAFs for prostate carcinoma in sons ages 0-66 years. RESULTS: The incidence of prostate carcinoma was doubled between the years 1961 and 1998. The familial SIRs for prostate carcinoma were 2.38 (95%CI, 2.18-2.59) for men with prostate carcinoma in the father only, 3.75 (95%CI, 2.73-4.95) for men with prostate carcinoma in a brother only, and 9.44 (95%CI, 5.76-14.03) for men with prostate carcinoma in both a father and a brother. The corresponding familial PAFs were 8.86%, 1.78%, and 0.99%, respectively, yielding a total PAF of 11.63%. Age specific risks were shown for the same proband histories. The SIR was 8.05 for prostate carcinoma before age 55 if a brother had been diagnosed before that age. If, in addition, a father was diagnosed at any age, then the SIR was 33.09. CONCLUSIONS: The authors recommend that having a brother who is diagnosed with prostate carcinoma before age 55 years or having a brother and father who are diagnosed at any age are indications to screen for prostate carcinoma. The familial PAF of prostate carcinoma among a population of sons ages 0-66 years was 11.63%.
PubMed ID
12216104 View in PubMed
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Age-specific familial risks for renal cell carcinoma with evidence on recessive heritable effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17710
Source
Kidney Int. 2004 Jun;65(6):2298-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Kari Hemminki
Xinjun Li
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Kidney Int. 2004 Jun;65(6):2298-302
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Aged
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Female
Genes, Recessive
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Systematic comparisons of mode of inheritance for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have not been carried out. The occurrence of cancer in parents and offspring may be due to dominant causes, whereas cancer affecting only siblings may indicate a recessive causation. Environmental effects need to be excluded. METHODS: The Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born after 1931 with their biologic parents, totaling 10.2 million persons. Cancer data were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry from years 1961 to 2000, included 2415 cases of RCC in offspring and 18531 in parents. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% CI limits were calculated for offspring whose parents or sibling were diagnosed with RCC. RESULTS: The SIRs for siblings for RCC depended on their age difference. SIR was 7.63 (95% CI 3.63-14.08) when the age difference was less than 3 years and compared to 3.43 (95% CI 1.77-6.02) for large age difference. SIRs for familial risk of RCC were 1.73 (95% CI 1.31-2.26) when a parent and 4.58 (95% CI 2.87-6.94) when a sibling had RCC. Age-specific analysis of familial RCC among siblings revealed maxima at ages 40 to 49 and 60 to 68 years. CONCLUSION: The findings in the present study offer evidence on recessive effects in early onset RCC.
PubMed ID
15149343 View in PubMed
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Age-time risk patterns of solid cancers in 60 901 non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivors from Finland, Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102725
Source
Br J Haematol. 2014 Mar;164(5):675-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Justo Lorenzo Bermejo
Eero Pukkala
Tom B Johannesen
Jan Sundquist
Kari Hemminki
Source
Br J Haematol. 2014 Mar;164(5):675-83
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Risk Assessment - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Survival after non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has increased thanks to improved treatment but NHL survivors have an increased risk of second neoplasms. The assessment of cancer risk patterns after NHL may help to quantify the late side-effects of therapy. Poisson regression was used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and absolute incidence rates for nine solid tumours based on a nationwide cohort of 60 901 NHL survivors from Finland, Norway and Sweden. Patients were diagnosed between 1980 and 2006 and developed 6815 s neoplasms. NHL patients showed an increased risk of each of the nine investigated cancer sites: prostate and pancreas (both RRs 1·28), breast (1·37), colorectum (1·48), urinary bladder (1·52), stomach and lung (both RRs 1·87), skin (melanoma 2·27) and kidney (2·56). The RRs showed a U-shaped relationship with time after NHL for all nine-second cancer types. NHL diagnosis early in life was a risk factor for the development of second cancers with the exception of melanoma, but a risk excess was even observed in patients diagnosed with NHL at age 80+ years. The present study provides accurate estimates on the adverse late effects of NHL therapy, which should guide the establishment of cancer prevention strategies in NHL survivors.
PubMed ID
24528128 View in PubMed
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Analysis of 153?115 patients with hematological malignancies refines the spectrum of familial risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310139
Source
Blood. 2019 09 19; 134(12):960-969
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-19-2019
Author
Amit Sud
Subhayan Chattopadhyay
Hauke Thomsen
Kristina Sundquist
Jan Sundquist
Richard S Houlston
Kari Hemminki
Author Affiliation
Division of Genetics and Epidemiology, The Institute of Cancer Research, London, United Kingdom.
Source
Blood. 2019 09 19; 134(12):960-969
Date
09-19-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child
Databases, Factual
Family
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Hematologic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Male
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Estimating familial cancer risks is clinically important in being able to discriminate between individuals in the population at differing risk for malignancy. To gain insight into the familial risk for the different hematological malignancies and their possible inter-relationship, we analyzed data on more than 16 million individuals from the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. After identifying 153?115 patients diagnosed with a primary hematological malignancy, we quantified familial relative risks (FRRs) by calculating standardized incident ratios (SIRs) in 391?131 of their first-degree relatives. The majority of hematological malignancies showed increased FRRs for the same tumor type, with the highest FRRs being observed for mixed cellularity Hodgkin lymphoma (SIR, 16.7), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (SIR, 15.8), and mantle cell lymphoma (SIR, 13.3). There was evidence for pleiotropic relationships; notably, chronic lymphocytic leukemia was associated with an elevated familial risk for other B-cell tumors and myeloproliferative neoplasms. Collectively, these data provide evidence for shared etiological factors for many hematological malignancies and provide information for identifying individuals at increased risk, as well as informing future gene discovery initiatives.
PubMed ID
31395603 View in PubMed
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Are twins at risk of cancer: results from the Swedish family-cancer database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16710
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2005 Oct;8(5):509-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Kari Hemminki
Bowang Chen
Author Affiliation
Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. k.hemminki@dkfz.de
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2005 Oct;8(5):509-14
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Endocrine Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Nervous System Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Seminoma - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
A few twin studies on cancer have addressed questions on the possible carcinogenic or protective effects of twining by comparing the occurrence of cancer in twins and singletons. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database of 10.2 million individuals and 69,654 0- to 70-year-old twin pairs were used to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all main cancers compared to singletons. The overall risk of cancer in same- or different-sex twins was at the same level as the risk for singletons. Testicular cancer, particularly seminoma, was increased among same-sex twins (1.54) and all twins to an SIR of 1.38. Among other tumors, neurinomas and non-thyroid endocrine gland tumors were increased. Colorectal cancers and leukemia were decreased among all twins. Melanoma and squamous cell skin cancer were decreased in male same-sex twins. The data on this unselected population of twins suggest that twinning per se is not a risk factor of cancer. In utero hormonal exposures or postnatal growth stimulation may be related to the risk of testicular cancer and pituitary tumors. Protective effects against colorectal cancer may be related to a beneficial diet, and in melanoma and skin cancer, to socioeconomic factors. The study involved multiple comparisons, and internal consistency between the results was one of the main factors considered for their plausibility. The results should encourage others working on twin and singleton populations to examine the specific associations and emerging hypotheses.
PubMed ID
16212840 View in PubMed
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Associated cancers in parents and offspring of polycythaemia vera and myelofibrosis patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98896
Source
Br J Haematol. 2009 Nov;147(4):526-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Kari Hemminki
Jan Sundquist
Justo L Bermejo
Author Affiliation
Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. k.hemminki@dkfz.de
Source
Br J Haematol. 2009 Nov;147(4):526-30
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Parents
Polycythemia Vera - epidemiology - genetics
Primary Myelofibrosis - epidemiology - genetics
Registries
Risk Assessment - methods
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Polycythaemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (MF) show concordant familial clustering but limited population level data are available on the aggregation of other discordant neoplasms in these families. We used the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to assess risks for VP and MF in families of cancer patients. A total of 3530 first PV and 1606 MF patients were identified, with high concordant familial risks. Several discordant familial associations were found for PV (acute myeloid leukaemia, Hodgkin disease, prostate and bladder cancers) or for MF (chronic lymphatic leukaemia, colorectal, kidney and cervical cancers) or for both (nervous system, eye and endocrine tumours).
PubMed ID
19754924 View in PubMed
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Association of first ocular melanoma with subsequent cutaneous melanoma: results from the Swedish Family-Cancer Database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18626
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Mar 20;104(2):257-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2003
Author
Kari Hemminki
Hong Zhang
Kamila Czene
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Mar 20;104(2):257-8
Date
Mar-20-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Databases, Factual
Eye Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - pathology
Risk
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - secondary
Sunlight - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Notes
Comment On: Int J Cancer. 2002 Sep 10;101(2):175-8212209995
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2003 Mar 20;104(2):25912569586
PubMed ID
12569585 View in PubMed
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208 records – page 1 of 21.