Skip header and navigation

Refine By

23 records – page 1 of 3.

Can pelvic floor muscle training reverse pelvic organ prolapse and reduce prolapse symptoms? An assessor-blinded, randomized, controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99392
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Aug;203(2):170.e1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Ingeborg Hoff Braekken
Memona Majida
Marie Ellström Engh
Kari Bø
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway. ingeborg.brekken@nih.no
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Aug;203(2):170.e1-7
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, University
Humans
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology - ultrasonography
Norway
Odds Ratio
Patient compliance
Pelvic Floor
Pelvic Organ Prolapse - complications - rehabilitation - ultrasonography
Quality of Life
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Incontinence, Stress - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training in reversing pelvic organ prolapse and alleviating symptoms. STUDY DESIGN: This assessor-blinded, parallel group, randomized, controlled trial conducted at a university hospital and a physical therapy clinic randomly assigned 109 women with prolapse stages I, II, and III to pelvic floor muscle training (n = 59) or control (n = 50). Both groups received lifestyle advices and learned "the Knack." In addition, pelvic floor muscle training comprised individual physical therapy sessions and home exercise. Student t test, Mann-Whitney U test, odds ratio, and effect size were used to compare groups. RESULTS: Eleven (19%) women in the pelvic floor muscle training group improved 1 Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification System stage vs 4 (8%) controls (P = .035). Compared with controls, the pelvic floor muscle training group elevated the bladder (difference: 3.0 mm; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-4.4; P
PubMed ID
20435294 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can postpartum pelvic floor muscle training reduce urinary and anal incontinence?: An assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308990
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2020 03; 222(3):247.e1-247.e8
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2020
Author
Thorgerdur Sigurdardottir
Thora Steingrimsdottir
Reynir T Geirsson
Thorhallur I Halldorsson
Thor Aspelund
Kari Bø
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: th.sigurdardottir@gmail.com.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2020 03; 222(3):247.e1-247.e8
Date
03-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Exercise Therapy
Fecal Incontinence - physiopathology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle Strength - physiology
Pelvic Floor - physiopathology
Postpartum Period - physiology
Pregnancy
Single-Blind Method
Urinary Incontinence - physiopathology - prevention & control
Abstract
Pelvic floor dysfunction, including urinary and anal incontinence, is a common postpartum complaint and likely to reduce quality of life.
To study the effects of individualized physical therapist-guided pelvic floor muscle training in the early postpartum period on urinary and anal incontinence and related bother, as well as pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance.
This was an assessor-blinded, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial evaluating effects of pelvic floor muscle training by a physical therapist on the rate of urinary and/or anal leakage (primary outcomes); related bother and muscle strength and endurance in the pelvic floor were secondary outcomes. Between 2016 and 2017, primiparous women giving birth at Landspitali University Hospital in Reykjavik, Iceland, were screened for eligibilty 6-10 weeks after childbirth. Of those identified as urinary incontinent, 95 were invited to participate, of whom 84 agreed. The intervention, starting at ~9 weeks postpartum consisted of 12 weekly sessions with a physical therapist, after which the main outcomes were assessed (endpoint, ~6 months postpartum). Additional follow-up was conducted at ~12 months postpartum. The control group received no instructions after the initial assessment. The Fisher exact test was used to test differences in the proportion of women with urinary and anal incontinence between the intervention and control groups, and independent-sample t tests were used for mean differences in muscle strength and endurance. Significance levels were set as a = 0.05.
A total of 41 and 43 women were randomized to the intervention and control groups, respectively. Three participants and 1 participant withdrew from these respective groups. Measurement variables and main delivery outcomes were not different at recruitment. At the endpoint, urinary incontinence was less frequent in the intervention group, with 21 participants (57%) still symptomatic, compared to 31 controls (82%) (P = .03), as was bladder-related bother with 10 participants (27%) in the intervention vs 23 (60%) in the control group (P = .005). Anal incontinence was not influenced by pelvic floor muscle training (P = .33), nor was bowel-related bother (P = .82). The mean differences between groups in measured pelvic floor muscle strength changes at endpoint was 5 hPa (95% confidence interval, 2-8; P = .003), and for pelvic floor muscle endurance changes, 50 hPa/s (95% confidence interval, 23-77; P = .001), both in favor of the intervention group. The mean between-group differences for anal sphincter strength changes was 10 hPa (95% confidence interval, 2-18; P = .01) and for anal sphincter endurance changes 95 hPa/s (95% confidence interval, 16-173; P = .02), both in favor of the intervention. At the follow-up visit 12 months postpartum, no differences were observed between the groups regarding rates of urinary and anal incontinence and related bother. Pelvic floor- and anal muscle strength and endurance favoring the intervention group were maintained.
Postpartum pelvic floor mucle training decreased the rate of urinary incontinence and related bother 6 months postpartum and increased muscle strength and endurance.
PubMed ID
31526791 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coital incontinence and vaginal symptoms and the relationship to pelvic floor muscle function in primiparous women at 12 months postpartum: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263772
Source
J Sex Med. 2015 Apr;12(4):994-1003
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Merete Kolberg Tennfjord
Gunvor Hilde
Jette Stær-Jensen
Franziska Siafarikas
Marie Ellström Engh
Kari Bø
Source
J Sex Med. 2015 Apr;12(4):994-1003
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - physiopathology
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Manometry
Muscle Strength - physiology
Norway
Parity
Pelvic Floor - physiopathology
Postpartum Period - physiology
Pressure
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior
Urinary Incontinence - physiopathology
Vagina - physiopathology
Abstract
Symptoms related to sexual dysfunction postpartum are scarcely addressed in the literature, and the relationship to pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function is largely unknown.
The aim of this study was to investigate primiparous women 12 months postpartum and study: (i) prevalence and bother of coital incontinence, vaginal symptoms, and sexual matters; and (ii) whether coital incontinence and vaginal symptoms were associated with vaginal resting pressure (VRP), PFM strength, and endurance.
International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire (ICIQ) sexual matters module and ICIQ-Vaginal Symptoms Questionnaire were used for questions on coital incontinence, vaginal symptoms, and sexual matters, respectively. PFM function was assessed by manometer (Camtech AS, Sandvika, Norway).
Coital incontinence, vaginal symptoms, and PFM function were the main outcome measures.
One hundred seventy-seven primiparous women, mean age 28.7 (standard deviation [SD] 4.3) participated. Of the 94% of women having sexual intercourse, coital incontinence was found for 1.2% whereas 34.5% reported at least one vaginal symptom interfering with the sexual life of primiparous women. Of the symptoms investigated, "vagina feels dry," "vagina feels sore," and "vagina feels loose or lax" were most prevalent, but the overall impact on the woman's sexual life was minimally bothersome, mean 1.4 out of 10 (SD 2.5). Women reporting "vagina feels loose or lax" had lower VRP, PFM strength, and endurance when compared with women without the symptom.
Twelve-month postpartum coital incontinence was rare, whereas the prevalence of vaginal symptoms interfering with sexual life was more common. The large majority of primiparous women in our study had sexual intercourse at 12 months postpartum and the reported overall bother on sexual life was low. Women reporting "vagina feels loose or lax" had lower VRP, PFM strength, and endurance when compared with women without the symptom.
PubMed ID
25648191 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cross-sectional study of early postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction and related bother in primiparous women 6-10 weeks postpartum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312146
Source
Int Urogynecol J. 2021 May 03; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-03-2021
Author
Thorgerdur Sigurdardottir
Kari Bø
Thora Steingrimsdottir
Thorhallur I Halldorsson
Thor Aspelund
Reynir T Geirsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Vatnsmýrarvegi 16, 101, Reykjavík, Iceland. th.sigurdardottir@gmail.com.
Source
Int Urogynecol J. 2021 May 03; :
Date
May-03-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
To study the prevalence of pelvic floor dysfunction and related bother in primiparous women 6-10 weeks postpartum, comparing vaginal and cesarean delivery.
Cross-sectional study of 721 mothers with singleton births in Reykjavik, Iceland, 2015 to 2017, using an electronic questionnaire. Information on urinary and anal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and sexual dysfunction with related bother (trouble, nuisance, worry, annoyance) was collected. Main outcome measures were prevalence of pelvic floor dysfunction and related bother.
The overall prevalence of urinary and anal incontinence was 48% and 60%, respectively. Bother regarding urinary symptoms was experienced by 27% and for anal symptoms by 56%. Pelvic organ prolapse was noted by 29%, with less than half finding this bothersome. Fifty-five percent were sexually active, of whom 66% reported coital pain. Of all the women, 48% considered sexual issues bothersome. Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse were more prevalent in women who delivered vaginally compared to cesarean section, but no differences were observed for anal incontinence and coital pain. Compared to women with BMI 50th percentile was predictive for urgency incontinence after vaginal delivery (OR 1.53; 95% CI 1.05-2.21). Episiotomy predicted more anal incontinence (OR 2.19; 95% CI 1.30-3.67). No associations between maternal and delivery characteristics were found for pelvic floor dysfunction after cesarean section.
Bothersome pelvic floor dysfunction symptoms are prevalent among first-time mothers in the immediate postpartum period.
PubMed ID
33938963 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diastasis recti abdominis during pregnancy and 12 months after childbirth: prevalence, risk factors and report of lumbopelvic pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280994
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2016 Sep;50(17):1092-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Jorun Bakken Sperstad
Merete Kolberg Tennfjord
Gunvor Hilde
Marie Ellström-Engh
Kari Bø
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2016 Sep;50(17):1092-6
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Muscular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pelvic Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Rectus Abdominis
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Diastasis recti abdominis (DRA) is defined as a separation of the 2 muscle bellies of rectus abdominis. To date there is scant knowledge on prevalence, risk factors, and consequences of the condition. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of DRA during pregnancy and post partum, presence of possible risk factors, and the occurrence of lumbopelvic pain among women with and without DRA.
This prospective cohort study followed 300 first-time pregnant women from pregnancy till 12 months post partum. Data were collected by electronic questionnaire and clinical examinations. DRA was defined as a palpated separation of =2 fingerbreadths either 4.5 cm above, at or 4.5 cm below the umbilicus. Women with and without DRA were compared with independent samples Student's t-test and ?(2)/Fisher exact test, and OR with significance level >0.05.
Prevalence of DRA was 33.1%, 60.0%, 45.4%, and 32.6% at gestation week 21, 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months post partum, respectively. No difference in risk factors was found when comparing women with and without DRA. OR showed a greater likelihood for DRA among women reporting heavy lifting =20 times weekly (OR 2.18 95% CI 1.05 to 4.52). There was no difference in reported lumbopelvic pain (p=0.10) in women with and without DRA.
Prevalence of mild DRA was high both during pregnancy and after childbirth. Women with and without DRA reported the same amount of lumbopelvic pain 12 months post partum.
Notes
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2013 Aug;122(2 Pt 1):329-3623969802
Cites: Aust J Physiother. 1997;43(2):109-11411676678
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Oct;35(5):1146-5016926217
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Aug;39(8):1423-3417762377
Cites: Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2007 Mar;18(3):321-816868659
Cites: Hernia. 2009 Jun;13(3):287-9219214651
Cites: J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2012 Apr;46(2):102-522471258
Cites: Phys Ther. 1988 Jul;68(7):1082-62968609
Cites: Plast Reconstr Surg. 1998 May;101(6):1685-91; discussion 1692-49583506
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 1973 Sep;32(5):413-84751776
Cites: Man Ther. 2016 Feb;21:41-5326474542
Cites: J Sci Med Sport. 2008 Jun;11(3):257-6317597005
Cites: Eur J Appl Physiol. 2012 Aug;112(8):2785-81522160180
Cites: Physiotherapy. 2014 Mar;100(1):1-824268942
Cites: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2013;43(7):495-50323633625
Cites: J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2014 Jun;48(3):163-924256310
Cites: Res Q Exerc Sport. 2000 Jun;71(2 Suppl):S1-1410925819
Cites: BMC Pediatr. 2013 Dec 21;13:21424358988
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2013 Dec;122(6):1231-824201679
Cites: Man Ther. 2013 Aug;18(4):294-823298825
Cites: Man Ther. 2015 Feb;20(1):200-525282439
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1992 Jan;19(1):115-221556672
Cites: Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2013 Aug;288(2):299-30323435798
Cites: Int Urogynecol J. 2012 Sep;23(9):1257-6322426877
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2002 Dec 15;27(24):2831-412486356
Cites: Ginekol Pol. 2011 Nov;82(11):817-2122384613
Cites: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2012 Nov;42(11):940-622810966
Cites: J Athl Train. 2003 Dec;38(4):281-28514737208
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2001 Dec;28(12):2726-3011764224
Cites: Phys Ther. 1987 Jul;67(7):1077-92955430
Cites: Eur Spine J. 2008 Jun;17(6):794-81918259783
Cites: Phys Ther. 1996 Jul;76(7):750-628677279
Cites: Physiotherapy. 2014 Dec;100(4):344-824559692
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Mar;125(3):531-925730212
PubMed ID
27324871 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does group training during pregnancy prevent lumbopelvic pain? A randomized clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164628
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(3):276-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Siv Mørkved
Kjell Asmund Salvesen
Berit Schei
Stian Lydersen
Kari Bø
Author Affiliation
Clinical Service and National Center for Fetal Medicine, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway. siv.morkved@ntnu.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(3):276-82
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Exercise Movement Techniques
Female
Health status
Humans
Low Back Pain - prevention & control
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Patient Education as Topic
Pelvic Floor - physiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Prevention of lumbopelvic pain in pregnancy has been sparsely studied. One aim of this study was to assess if a 12-week training program during pregnancy can prevent and/or treat lumbopelvic pain. A randomized controlled trial was conducted at Trondheim University Hospital and three outpatient physiotherapy clinics. Three hundred and one healthy nulliparous women were included at 20 weeks of pregnancy and randomly allocated to a training group (148) or a control group (153).
The outcome measures were self-reported symptoms of lumbopelvic pain (once per week or more), sick leave, and functional status. Pain drawing was used to document the painful area of the body. The intervention included daily pelvic floor muscle training at home, and weekly group training over 12 weeks including aerobic exercises, pelvic floor muscle and additional exercises, and information related to pregnancy.
At 36 weeks of gestation women in the training group were significantly less likely to report lumbopelvic pain: 65/148 (44%) versus 86/153 (56%) (p=0.03). Three months after delivery the difference was 39/148 (26%) in the training group versus 56/153 (37%) in the control group (p=0.06). There was no difference in sick leave during pregnancy, but women in the training group had significantly (p=0.01) higher scores on functional status.
A 12-week specially designed training program during pregnancy was effective in preventing lumbopelvic pain in pregnancy.
Notes
Comment In: Aust J Physiother. 2007;53(3):20217899664
PubMed ID
17364300 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do pregnant women exercise their pelvic floor muscles?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166411
Source
Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2007 Jul;18(7):733-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Kari Bø
Lene A H Haakstad
Nanna Voldner
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, P.O. Box 4014, Ullevål Stadion, 0806, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Medical Center, University of Oslo, Norway. kari.bo@nih.no
Source
Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2007 Jul;18(7):733-6
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pelvic Floor - physiology
Pregnancy - physiology
Questionnaires
Urinary Incontinence - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The aims of the present study were to assess the number of women performing pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) during pregnancy and to compare the background variables in those exercising and in those who did not. Four hundred and sixty-seven pregnant women (response rate 84%), mean age 31.5 years (range 20-49), answered a questionnaire on general physical activity level during pregnancy including PFMT. The questionnaire was sent out in week 32 of gestation and answered within week 36. Twenty-four percent reported problems with urinary incontinence and 9% flatus/fecal incontinence. The percentages of pregnant women performing PFMT at least once a week before pregnancy and during trimesters 1, 2, and 3 were 7, 12.9, 17.6, and 17.4%, respectively. More women with lower prepregnancy BMI and with present and past pelvic girdle pain were performing regular PFMT. No significant differences were found in any other background variables. It is concluded that relatively few women perform regular PFMT during pregnancy. In conclusion, only 17% of pregnant Norwegian women reported performing PFMT during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
17120174 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of aerobic dance on cardiorespiratory fitness in pregnant women: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118626
Source
Physiotherapy. 2013 Mar;99(1):42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Silje Halvorsen
Lene A H Haakstad
Elisabeth Edvardsen
Kari Bø
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, P.O. Box 4014, Ullevål Stadion, 0806 Oslo, Norway. silje.halvorsen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Physiotherapy. 2013 Mar;99(1):42-8
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Dancing - physiology
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Lactates - blood
Norway
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Pregnancy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate the effectiveness of aerobic dance on cardiorespiratory fitness in pregnant women.
Randomised controlled trial.
Sixty-two primiparous women with a mean age of 30.6 [standard deviation (SD) 3.7] years randomised to exercise (n=34) and (n=28) control groups.
Two aerobic dance classes per week and 30 minutes of daily self-imposed physical activity for 12 weeks.
Cardiorespiratory fitness, assessed using a submaximal treadmill test to establish oxygen uptake (VO2) (ml/kg/minute) at three different levels of blood lactate. Levels 1, 2 and 3 were calculated and defined as 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mmol/l above resting blood lactate level, respectively.
The women in the exercise group attended a mean of 20 (SD 12) out of 24 aerobic dance classes. Both groups had a small significant decrease in VO2 between baseline and post-intervention: the exercise group decreased from 25.8 (SD 3.3) to 24.5 (SD 3.8) ml/kg/minute and the control group decreased from 25.8 (SD 3.1) to 24.5 (SD 2.5) ml/kg/minute at Level 3 (anaerobic threshold) (mean difference in change at Level 3=0.1, 95% confidence interval -1.4 to 1.7; P=0.89). There were no differences in change between the groups at any level.
A 12-week aerobic dance programme had no effect on cardiorespiratory fitness in pregnant women.
PubMed ID
23186730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of Regular Resistance Training on Motivation, Self-Perceived Health, and Quality of Life in Previously Inactive Overweight Women: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280213
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2016;2016:3815976
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Hege Heiestad
Anne Mette Rustaden
Kari Bø
Lene A H Haakstad
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2016;2016:3815976
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Exercise - psychology
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Quality of Life - psychology
Resistance Training - methods - statistics & numerical data
Sedentary lifestyle
Treatment Outcome
Women's Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Objectives. The aim was to investigate the effects of three different types of resistance training implementation. Design. Randomized controlled trial. Methods. Inactive, overweight women (n = 143), mean BMI 31.3 ? 5.2?kg/m(2), mean age 39.9 ? 10.5 years, were randomized to one of the following groups: A (BodyPump group training), B (individual follow-up by a personal trainer), C (nonsupervised exercise), or D (controls). The intervention included 12 weeks of 45-60 minutes' full-body resistance training three sessions per week. The outcomes in this paper are all secondary outcome measures: exercise motivation, self-perceived health, and quality of life. Results. Adherence averaged 26.1 ? 10.3 of 36 prescribed sessions. After the intervention period, all three training groups (A-C) had better scores on exercise motivation (A = 43.9 ? 19.8, B = 47.6 ? 15.4, C = 48.4 ? 17.8) compared to the control group (D) (26.5 ? 18.2) (p
PubMed ID
27462608 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exercise during pregnancy and risk of cesarean delivery in nulliparous women: a large population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283022
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2016 Dec;215(6):791.e1-791.e13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Katrine Mari Owe
Wenche Nystad
Hein Stigum
Siri Vangen
Kari Bø
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2016 Dec;215(6):791.e1-791.e13
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Elective Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Emergencies
Exercise
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Prospective Studies
Protective factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Weight-Bearing
Young Adult
Abstract
Vaginal delivery for the first birth is of great importance for further obstetric performance for the individual woman. Given the rising cesarean delivery rates worldwide over the past decades, a search for modifiable factors that are associated with cesarean delivery is needed. Exercise may be a modifiable factor that is associated with type of delivery, but the results of previous studies are not conclusive.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between exercise during pregnancy and cesarean delivery, both acute and elective, in nulliparous women.
We conducted a population-based cohort study that involved 39,187 nulliparous women with a singleton pregnancy who were enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study between 2000 and 2009. All women answered 2 questionnaires in pregnancy weeks 17 and 30. Acute and elective cesarean delivery data were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Information on exercise frequency and type was assessed prospectively by questionnaires in pregnancy weeks 17 and 30. Generalized linear models estimated risk differences of acute and elective cesarean delivery for different frequencies and types of exercise during pregnancy weeks 17 and 30. We used restricted cubic splines to examine dose-response associations of exercise frequency and acute cesarean delivery. A test for nonlinearity was also conducted.
The total cesarean delivery rate was 15.4% (n=6030), of which 77.8% (n=4689) was acute cesarean delivery. Exercise during pregnancy was associated with a reduced risk of cesarean delivery, particularly for acute cesarean delivery. A nonlinear association was observed for exercise frequency in weeks 17 and 30 and risk of acute cesarean delivery (test for nonlinearity, P=.003 and P=.027, respectively). The largest risk reduction was observed for acute cesarean delivery among women who exercised >5 times weekly during weeks 17 (-2.2%) and 30 (-3.6%) compared with nonexercisers (test for trend, P
PubMed ID
27555317 View in PubMed
Less detail

23 records – page 1 of 3.