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Altered knee joint neuromuscular control during landing from a jump in 10-15 year old children with Generalised Joint Hypermobility. A substudy of the CHAMPS-study Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268916
Source
J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2015 Jun;25(3):501-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Tina Junge
Niels Wedderkopp
Jonas Bloch Thorlund
Karen Søgaard
Birgit Juul-Kristensen
Source
J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2015 Jun;25(3):501-7
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Joint Instability - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Knee Joint - physiology - physiopathology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology - physiopathology
Quadriceps Muscle - physiology - physiopathology
Abstract
Generalised Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is considered an intrinsic risk factor for knee injuries. Knee neuromuscular control during landing may be altered in GJH due to reduced passive stability. The aim was to identify differences in knee neuromuscular control during landing of the Single-Leg-Hop-for-Distance test (SLHD) in 25 children with GJH compared to 29 children without GJH (controls), all 10-15years. Inclusion criteria for GJH: Beighton score?5/9 and minimum one hypermobile knee. EMG was recorded from the quadriceps, the hamstring and the calf muscles, presented relative to Maximum Voluntary Electrical activity (MVE). There was no difference in jump length between groups. Before landing, GJH had 33% lower Semitendinosus, but 32% higher Gastrocnemius Medialis activity and 39% higher co contraction of the lateral knee muscles, than controls. After landing, GJH had 36% lower Semitendinosus activity than controls, all significant findings. Although the groups performed equally in SLHD, GJH had a Gastrocnemius Medialis dominated neuromuscular strategy before landing, plausibly caused by reduced Semitendinosus activity. Reduced Semitendinosus activity was seen in GJH after landing, but with no compensatory Gastrocnemius Medialis activity. Reduced pre and post-activation of the Semitendinosus may present a risk factor for traumatic knee injuries as ACL ruptures in GJH with knee hypermobility.
PubMed ID
25801907 View in PubMed
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The association between health and sickness absence among Danish and non-Western immigrant cleaners in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125014
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 May;86(4):397-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Isabella G Carneiro
Charlotte D N Rasmussen
Marie B Jørgensen
Mari-Ann Flyvholm
Kasper Olesen
Pascal Madeleine
Dorte Ekner
Karen Søgaard
Andreas Holtermann
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkalle 105, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. igc@nrcwe.dk
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 May;86(4):397-405
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Housekeeping
Humans
Hypertension - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Pain - ethnology
Odds Ratio
Self Report
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the study is to investigate the association between health and sickness absence among Danish and non-Western immigrant cleaners in Denmark.
This study is based on a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 2007 to 2008. The study population includes 276 cleaners, 144 Danish and 132 non-Western immigrant cleaners. Cumulative sickness absences during a 6-month period from administrative records were subdivided into no sickness absence (0 days), low occurrence of sickness absence (1-10 days) and high occurrence of sickness absence (over 10 days). Measures of health consisted of self-report and objective assessments. The relationship between sickness absence and health was analyzed through multinomial logistic regression, stratified by immigrant status.
For both Danish and non-Western immigrant cleaners, poor self-reported health was significantly related to high occurrence of sickness absence. Among Danish cleaners, high blood pressure was related to high occurrence of sickness absence. Among non-Western immigrant cleaners, total body pain and having one or more diagnosed chronic disease were related to high occurrence of sickness absence. No association between health and low occurrence of sickness absence was found.
The findings confirm the importance of health for high occurrence of sickness absence, in both ethnic groups. Moreover, low occurrence of sickness absence was not related to the health conditions investigated.
PubMed ID
22526090 View in PubMed
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Associations between psychosocial work environment and hypertension among non-Western immigrant and Danish cleaners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128678
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 Oct;85(7):829-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Kasper Olesen
Isabella G Carneiro
Marie B Jørgensen
Reiner Rugulies
Charlotte D N Rasmussen
Karen Søgaard
Andreas Holtermann
Mari-Ann Flyvholm
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 Oct;85(7):829-35
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Denmark
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Psychology
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Work - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Non-Western cleaners have reported better psychosocial work environment but worse health compared with their Danish colleagues. The aim of this study was to compare the association between psychosocial work environment and hypertension among non-Western immigrant cleaners and Danish cleaners.
Two hundred and eighty-five cleaners from nine workplaces in Denmark participated in this cross-sectional study. The cleaners were identified as non-Western immigrants (n = 137) or Danes (n = 148). Blood pressure was measured in a seated position, and psychosocial work environment was assessed by the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ). In each population, multivariate logistic regressions were applied testing for an association between each of the COPSOQ scales and hypertension.
Models adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoking, workplace and physical work exertion showed that high Trust regarding management (OR = 0.50) and high Predictability (OR = 0.63) were statistically significantly associated with low prevalence of hypertension in the Danish population. In the immigrant population, no significant associations were found. Analyses on interaction effects showed that associations between Meaning of work and hypertension were significantly different among the two populations (p 
PubMed ID
22179817 View in PubMed
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Computer users' risk factors for developing shoulder, elbow and back symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177574
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004 Oct;30(5):390-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Birgit Juul-Kristensen
Karen Søgaard
Jesper Strøyer
Chris Jensen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. bjk@ami.dk
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004 Oct;30(5):390-8
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Back Pain - etiology
Computers
Denmark - epidemiology
Elbow
Female
Human Engineering
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Posture
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Shoulder Pain - etiology
Abstract
This prospective study concentrated on determining factors of computer work that predict musculoskeletal symptoms in the shoulder, elbow, and low-back regions.
A questionnaire on ergonomics, work pauses, work techniques, and psychosocial and work factors was delivered to 5033 office workers at baseline in early 1999 (response rate 69%) and to 3361 respondents at the time of the follow-up in late 2000 (response rate 77%). An increased frequency or intensity of symptoms was the outcome variable, including only nonsymptomatic respondents from the baseline questionnaire (symptom frequency below 8 days within the last 12 months or intensity score below 4 within the last 3 months).
In the follow-up, 10%, 18%, and 23% had symptoms more often in the elbow, shoulder, and low back, respectively, and 14%, 20%, and 22% had more intense symptoms. Women were more likely to be afflicted than men in all regions. In the full-fit multivariate logistic regression analysis, little influence on the timing of a rest pause and being disturbed by glare or reflection were significant predictors of shoulder symptoms, screen below eye height was a significant predictor for elbow symptoms, and previous symptoms was a significant predictor for symptoms in all regions. Computer worktime and psychosocial dimensions were not significant predictors.
Influence on work pauses, reduction of glare or reflection, and screen height are important factors in the design of future computer workstations. Since previous symptoms was a significant predictor of recurrent symptoms in all three regions under study, it can be concluded that musculoskeletal symptoms are persistent.
PubMed ID
15529802 View in PubMed
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A conceptual model for worksite intelligent physical exercise training--IPET--intervention for decreasing life style health risk indicators among employees: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264697
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:652
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Gisela Sjøgaard
Just Bendix Justesen
Mike Murray
Tina Dalager
Karen Søgaard
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:652
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Health Promotion - economics
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Occupational Health Services
Risk Reduction Behavior
Workplace
Abstract
Health promotion at the work site in terms of physical activity has proven positive effects but optimization of relevant exercise training protocols and implementation for high adherence are still scanty.
The aim of this paper is to present a study protocol with a conceptual model for planning the optimal individually tailored physical exercise training for each worker based on individual health check, existing guidelines and state of the art sports science training recommendations in the broad categories of cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength in specific body parts, and functional training including balance training. The hypotheses of this research are that individually tailored worksite-based intelligent physical exercise training, IPET, among workers with inactive job categories will: 1) Improve cardiorespiratory fitness and/or individual health risk indicators, 2) Improve muscle strength and decrease musculoskeletal disorders, 3) Succeed in regular adherence to worksite and leisure physical activity training, and 3) Reduce sickness absence and productivity losses (presenteeism) in office workers. The present RCT study enrolled almost 400 employees with sedentary jobs in the private as well as public sectors. The training interventions last 2 years with measures at baseline as well as one and two years follow-up.
If proven effective, the intelligent physical exercise training scheduled as well as the information for its practical implementation can provide meaningful scientifically based information for public health policy.
ClinicalTrials.gov, number: NCT01366950.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24964869 View in PubMed
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Effects on musculoskeletal pain, work ability and sickness absence in a 1-year randomised controlled trial among cleaners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129989
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:840
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Marie B Jørgensen
Anne Faber
Jørgen V Hansen
Andreas Holtermann
Karen Søgaard
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. mbj@nrcwe.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:840
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior Therapy - methods
Denmark
Female
Housekeeping
Humans
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Pain - physiopathology
Occupational Exposure
Questionnaires
Sick Leave - trends
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
Only a few workplace initiatives among cleaners have been reported, even though they constitute a job group in great need of health promotion. The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the effect of either physical coordination training or cognitive behavioural training on musculoskeletal pain, work ability and sickness absence among cleaners.
A cluster-randomised controlled trial was conducted among 294 female cleaners allocated to either physical coordination training (PCT), cognitive behavioural training (CBTr) or a reference group (REF). Questionnaires about musculoskeletal pain and work ability were completed at baseline and after one year's intervention. Sickness absence data were obtained from the managers' records. Analyses were performed according to the intention-to-treat-principle (ITT).
No overall reduction in musculoskeletal pain, work ability or sickness absence from either PCT or CBTr compared with REF was found in conservative ITT analyses. However, explorative analyses revealed a treatment effect for musculoskeletal pain of the PCT. People with chronic neck/shoulder pain at baseline were more frequently non-chronic at follow-up after PCT compared with REF (p = 0.05).
The PCT intervention appeared effective for reducing chronic neck/shoulder pain among the female cleaners. It is recommended that future interventions among similar high-risk job groups focus on the implementation aspects of the interventions to maximise outcomes more distal from the intervention such as work ability and sickness absence.
ISRCTN: ISRCTN96241850.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22044549 View in PubMed
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Efficacy of 'Tailored Physical Activity' on reducing sickness absence among health care workers: A 3-months randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279492
Source
Man Ther. 2015 Oct;20(5):666-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Lotte Nygaard Andersen
Birgit Juul-Kristensen
Kirsten Kaya Roessler
Lene Gram Herborg
Thomas Lund Sørensen
Karen Søgaard
Source
Man Ther. 2015 Oct;20(5):666-71
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Age Factors
Denmark
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Pain - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Return to work
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Single-Blind Method
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim was to evaluate efficacy of "Tailored Physical Activity" (TPA) versus a reference group (REF) in reducing the number of self-reported days of sickness absence for health care workers in the Sonderborg Municipality.
In this randomised controlled trial, all participants (n = 54) received health guidance for 1.5 h and were randomised to TPA or REF. The primary aim was to make a comparison of participants' self-reported sickness absence due to musculoskeletal troubles measured three months after baseline. Secondary outcomes included anthropometric, health-related and physical capacity measures.
A TPA intervention was not significantly more effective than REF in reducing sickness absence caused by musculoskeletal troubles. However, there were significant improvements for TPA participants compared to REF in reducing pain intensity from 47.9 mm to 21.8 mm (p
PubMed ID
25983237 View in PubMed
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Face validity of the single work ability item: comparison with objectively measured heart rate reserve over several days.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259338
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 May;11(5):5333-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Nidhi Gupta
Bjørn Søvsø Jensen
Karen Søgaard
Isabella Gomes Carneiro
Caroline Stordal Christiansen
Christiana Hanisch
Andreas Holtermann
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 May;11(5):5333-48
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Self Report
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Work Capacity Evaluation
Workload
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the face validity of the self-reported single item work ability with objectively measured heart rate reserve (%HRR) among blue-collar workers.
We utilized data from 127 blue-collar workers (Female = 53; Male = 74) aged 18-65 years from the cross-sectional "New method for Objective Measurements of physical Activity in Daily living (NOMAD)" study. The workers reported their single item work ability and completed an aerobic capacity cycling test and objective measurements of heart rate reserve monitored with Actiheart for 3-4 days with a total of 5,810 h, including 2,640 working hours.
A significant moderate correlation between work ability and %HRR was observed among males (R = -0.33, P = 0.005), but not among females (R = 0.11, P = 0.431). In a gender-stratified multi-adjusted logistic regression analysis, males with high %HRR were more likely to report a reduced work ability compared to males with low %HRR [OR = 4.75, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.31 to 17.25]. However, this association was not found among females (OR = 0.26, 95% CI 0.03 to 2.16), and a significant interaction between work ability, %HRR and gender was observed (P = 0.03).
The observed association between work ability and objectively measured %HRR over several days among male blue-collar workers supports the face validity of the single work ability item. It is a useful and valid measure of the relation between physical work demands and resources among male blue-collar workers. The contrasting association among females needs to be further investigated.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24840350 View in PubMed
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Fitness, work, and leisure-time physical activity and ischaemic heart disease and all-cause mortality among men with pre-existing cardiovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144585
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Sep;36(5):366-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Andreas Holtermann
Ole Steen Mortensen
Hermann Burr
Karen Søgaard
Finn Gyntelberg
Poul Suadicani
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. aho@nrcwe.dk
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Sep;36(5):366-72
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology - mortality
Body mass index
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Intermittent Claudication - epidemiology - mortality
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Health
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Work
Abstract
Our aim was to study the relative impact of physical fitness, physical demands at work, and physical activity during leisure time on ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and all-cause mortality among employed men with pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD).
We carried out a 30-year follow-up of the Copenhagen Male Study of 274 gainfully employed men, aged 40-59 years who had a history of CVD (ie, myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, and intermittent claudication). We estimated physical fitness [maximal oxygen consumption (VO (2)Max)] using the Astrand cycling test and determined physical work demands and leisure-time physical activity using a self-reported questionnaire. Results Among 274 men with a history of CVD, 93 men died from IHD. Using male employees with a history of CVD and a low level of fitness as the reference group, our Cox analyses - adjusted for age, blood pressure, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, physical work demands, leisure-time physical activity, and social class - showed a substantially reduced risk for IHD mortality among employees who were intermediately fit [VO (2)Max range 25-36; hazard ratio (HR) 0.54, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) CI 0.32-0.93] and highly fit (VO (2)Max range 37-50; HR 0.28, 95% CI 0.12-0.66). We found a positive, but statistically non-significant association between physical demands at work and all-cause mortality.
Among gainfully employed men with pre-existing CVD, a high physical fitness was associated with a substantially reduced risk for IHD and all-cause mortality.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Sep;36(5):349-5520686737
PubMed ID
20352173 View in PubMed
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Health disparities between immigrant and Danish cleaners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99733
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2011 Jan 4;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-2011
Author
Marie B Jørgensen
Charlotte D N Rasmussen
Isabella G Carneiro
Mari-Ann Flyvholm
Kasper Olesen
Dorte Ekner
Karen Søgaard
Andreas Holtermann
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2011 Jan 4;
Date
Jan-4-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: It is unknown whether immigrants working in the cleaning industry have a poorer health and work ability than cleaners from the native population. The main aim was to investigate differences in objective and self-reported health measures between immigrant and Danish cleaners. METHODS: Three hundred and fifty-one cleaners, consisting of 166 Danes (88% women) and 179 immigrants (74% women) (6 with unknown ethnicity), from 9 workplaces in Denmark participated in the study. Health and work ability were obtained by objective (e.g., BMI and blood pressure) and self-reported measures (e.g., work ability, self-rated health, and musculoskeletal symptoms). In order to investigate differences between Danish and immigrant cleaners, logistic regression analyses and General Linear Models were performed. RESULTS: When controlling for age, sex, workplace, job seniority, and smoking, more Danish compared with immigrant cleaners were current smokers (42% vs. 28%, p 
PubMed ID
21203770 View in PubMed
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