Skip header and navigation

Refine By

13 records – page 1 of 2.

Association between fish consumption, dietary omega-3 fatty acids and persistent organic pollutants intake, and type 2 diabetes in 18 First Nations in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282399
Source
Environ Res. 2017 May 05;156:725-737
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-05-2017
Author
Lesya Marushka
Malek Batal
William David
Harold Schwartz
Amy Ing
Karen Fediuk
Donald Sharp
Andrew Black
Constantine Tikhonov
Hing Man Chan
Source
Environ Res. 2017 May 05;156:725-737
Date
May-05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
First Nations (FNs) populations in Canada experience a disproportionally higher rate of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared to the general population. Recent data suggest that a high consumption of fish may help prevent T2D. On the other hand, fish might also be a potential source of environmental contaminants which could potentially be a risk factor for T2D.
To investigate the potential associations between self-reported T2D and consumption of locally-harvested fish, dietary long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (n-3FAs) and persistent organic pollutants intake among adult FNs living on reserve in Ontario.
Data from the First Nations Food Nutrition and Environment Study, which included a cross-sectional study of 1429 Ontario FNs adults living in 18 communities across 4 ecozones in 2012 were analyzed. Social and lifestyle data were collected using household interviews. The consumption of locally-harvested fish was estimated using a traditional food frequency questionnaire along with portion size information obtained from 24hr recalls. Fish samples were analyzed for the presence of contaminants including dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Dietary intakes of DDE and PCBs were estimated using community-specific levels of DDE/PCBs in fish species. Multiple logistic regression models adjusted for potential covariates including age, gender, body mass index, physical activity, total energy intake, smoking, and education were developed.
The prevalence of T2D in Ontario FNs was 24.4%. A significant positive association between fish consumption of one portion per week and more and T2D compared to no fish consumption was found (OR=2.5 (95% CI: 1.38-4.58). Dietary DDE and PCBs intake was positively associated with T2D (OR=1.09 (95%CI: 1.05-1.75) for DDE and OR=1.07 (95%CI: 1.004-1.27) for PCBs) per unit increase in DDE/PCBs while n-3-FAs intake, adjusted for DDE/PCBs intake, showed an inverse effect against T2D among older individuals (OR=0.86 (95% CI: 0.46-0.99).
Our results support previous findings that exposure to DDE and PCBs may increase the risk of T2D. Elevated levels of contaminants in fish may counteract with potentially beneficial effects of n-3FAs from fish consumption. However, the overall health benefits of high consumption of fish with a high n-3 FAs content may outweigh the adverse effect of contaminants.
PubMed ID
28482294 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary nutrients and anthropometry of Dene/Métis and Yukon children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4731
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):147-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Tomoko Nakano
Karen Fediuk
Norma Kassi
Grace M Egeland
Harriet V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), and School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):147-56
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Arctic Regions
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Child Nutrition
Child Nutrition Disorders - etiology
Child Welfare - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Micronutrients
Multivariate Analysis
Nutritional Status
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Trace Elements
Vitamins
Yukon Territory
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe nutrient intakes and anthropometry of 10-12-year-old Dene/Métis and Yukon children in the Canadian Arctic. STUDY DESIGN: 24 h-recall interviews (n = 222 interviews) were conducted on Canadian Dene/Métis and Yukon children in five communities during two seasons in 2000-2001; the children were measured for height and weight (n = 216). METHODS: Assessment of nutrient adequacy used Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) including cut-point procedures. Anthropometric measurements (height and weight) were assessed and body mass index (BMI) was compared to the 2000 CDC Growth Charts. RESULTS: Thirty-two percent of the children were above the 85th percentile of BMI-for-age. More than 50 percent of children were below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for vitamins A and E, phosphorus and magnesium; mean intakes were below the Adequate Intake (AI) for vitamin D, calcium, dietary fiber, omega-6 fatty acids, and omega-3 fatty acids. Nutrients that were probably adequate for some gender/season groups were protein, carbohydrate, iron, copper, selenium, zinc, manganese, riboflavin and vitamins B6 and C. CONCLUSIONS: Excessive prevalence of overweight and inadequacy of some nutrients were observed among Dene/Métis and Yukon children, suggesting a necessity for dietary improvement. However, many nutrients were adequate, in some cases probably due to continued traditional food use.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):107-915945280
PubMed ID
15945284 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food security in Nunavut, Canada: barriers and recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165008
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Hing Man Chan
Karen Fediuk
Sue Hamilton
Laura Rostas
Amy Caughey
Harriet Kuhnlein
Grace Egeland
Eric Loring
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Canada. lchan@unbc.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Food Supply
Humans
Income
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The food supply of Inuit living in Nunavut, Canada, is characterized by market food of relatively low nutritional value and nutrient-dense traditional food. The objective of this study is to assess community perceptions about the availability and accessibility of traditional and market foods in Nunavut.
A qualitative study using focus group methodology.
Focus groups were conducted in 6 communities in Nunavut in 2004 and collected information was analyzed.
Barriers to increased traditional food consumption included high costs of hunting and changes in lifestyle and cultural practices. Participants suggested that food security could be gained through increased economic support for local community hunts, freezers and education programs, as well as better access to cheaper and higher quality market food.
Interventions to improve the dietary quality of Nunavut residents are discussed.
PubMed ID
17319086 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food use of Dene/Métis and Yukon children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4732
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):137-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Tomoko Nakano
Karen Fediuk
Norma Kassi
Harriet V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), and School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):137-46
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Body mass index
Child
Child Nutrition
Cultural Characteristics
Diet - standards
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Preferences - ethnology
Health Education - standards
Health Promotion - standards
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Nutritional Status
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Yukon Territory
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe food use of Dene/Métis and Yukon children with focus on food sources--traditional food (TF) and market food (MF), season, gender and location. STUDY DESIGN: Children of 10-12 years of age were interviewed for 24-h recalls (n = 222 interviews) in five communities during two seasons in 2000-2001. METHODS: Differences in children's food and nutrient intakes when consuming or not consuming at least one item of TF and across three regions were tested using ANCOVA after rank transformation of raw values. Food use was described and compared by food groups. RESULTS: MF was the major portion of the diet, with TF contributing only an average 4.3%-4.7% of energy in the two seasons. Most TF was in the form of land animal meats. More than half of the energy intake from MF came from less nutrient dense food items. In spite of low TF intake, children who consumed TF had significantly (P
Notes
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):107-915945280
PubMed ID
15945283 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quantifying associations of the dietary share of ultra-processed foods with overall diet quality in First Nations peoples in the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294580
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 Jan; 21(1):103-113
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Malek Batal
Louise Johnson-Down
Jean-Claude Moubarac
Amy Ing
Karen Fediuk
Tonio Sadik
Constantine Tikhonov
Laurie Chan
Noreen Willows
Author Affiliation
1Département de Nutrition, Faculté de Médecine,Université de Montréal,Pavillon Liliane de Stewart,CP 6128 succ. Centre-Ville,Montréal,QC,Canada,H3T 1A8.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 Jan; 21(1):103-113
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Body mass index
British Columbia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Fast Foods
Female
Food Handling
Food Quality
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Manitoba
Mental Recall
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Ontario
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
To quantify associations of the dietary share of ultra-processed foods (UPF) with the overall diet quality of First Nations peoples.
A cross-sectional analysis of data from the First Nations Food, Nutrition and Environment Study, designed to contribute to knowledge gaps regarding the diet of First Nations peoples living on-reserve, south of the 60th parallel. A multistage sampling of communities was conducted. All foods from 24 h dietary recalls were categorized into NOVA categories and analyses were performed to evaluate the impact of UPF on diet quality.
Western and Central Canada.
First Nations participants aged 19 years or older.
The sample consisted of 3700 participants. UPF contributed 53·9 % of energy. Compared with the non-UPF fraction of the diet, the UPF fraction had 3·5 times less vitamin A, 2·4 times less K, 2·2 times less protein, 2·3 times more free sugars and 1·8 times more Na. As the contribution of UPF to energy increased so did the overall intakes of energy, carbohydrate, free sugar, saturated fat, Na, Ca and vitamin C, and Na:K; while protein, fibre, K, Fe and vitamin A decreased. Diets of individuals who ate traditional First Nations food (e.g. wild plants and game animals) on the day of the recall were lower in UPF.
UPF were prevalent in First Nations diets. Efforts to curb UPF consumption and increase intake of traditional First Nations foods and other fresh or minimally processed foods would improve diet quality and health in First Nations peoples.
PubMed ID
28738909 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quantifying associations of the dietary share of ultra-processed foods with overall diet quality in First Nations peoples in the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284596
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Jul 25;:1-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-25-2017
Author
Malek Batal
Louise Johnson-Down
Jean-Claude Moubarac
Amy Ing
Karen Fediuk
Tonio Sadik
Constantine Tikhonov
Laurie Chan
Noreen Willows
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Jul 25;:1-11
Date
Jul-25-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To quantify associations of the dietary share of ultra-processed foods (UPF) with the overall diet quality of First Nations peoples.
A cross-sectional analysis of data from the First Nations Food, Nutrition and Environment Study, designed to contribute to knowledge gaps regarding the diet of First Nations peoples living on-reserve, south of the 60th parallel. A multistage sampling of communities was conducted. All foods from 24 h dietary recalls were categorized into NOVA categories and analyses were performed to evaluate the impact of UPF on diet quality.
Western and Central Canada.
First Nations participants aged 19 years or older.
The sample consisted of 3700 participants. UPF contributed 53·9 % of energy. Compared with the non-UPF fraction of the diet, the UPF fraction had 3·5 times less vitamin A, 2·4 times less K, 2·2 times less protein, 2·3 times more free sugars and 1·8 times more Na. As the contribution of UPF to energy increased so did the overall intakes of energy, carbohydrate, free sugar, saturated fat, Na, Ca and vitamin C, and Na:K; while protein, fibre, K, Fe and vitamin A decreased. Diets of individuals who ate traditional First Nations food (e.g. wild plants and game animals) on the day of the recall were lower in UPF.
UPF were prevalent in First Nations diets. Efforts to curb UPF consumption and increase intake of traditional First Nations foods and other fresh or minimally processed foods would improve diet quality and health in First Nations peoples.
PubMed ID
28738909 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Relationship between Persistent Organic Pollutants Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes among First Nations in Ontario and Manitoba, Canada: A Difference in Difference Analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290634
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Mar 17; 15(3):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-17-2018
Author
Lesya Marushka
Xuefeng Hu
Malek Batal
Tonio Sadik
Harold Schwartz
Amy Ing
Karen Fediuk
Constantine Tikhonov
Hing Man Chan
Author Affiliation
Biology Department, University of Ottawa, 180 Gendron Hall, 30 Marie Curie, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada. lmaru073@uottawa.ca.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Mar 17; 15(3):
Date
Mar-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
We previously studied the association between fish consumption and prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Manitoba and Ontario First Nations (FNs), Canada and found different results. In this study, we used a difference in difference model to analyze the data. Dietary and health data from the First Nations Food Nutrition and Environment Study, a cross-sectional study of 706 Manitoba and 1429 Ontario FNs were analyzed. The consumption of fish was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Fish samples were analyzed for dichloro diphenyldichloro ethylene (DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) content. Difference in difference model results showed that persistent organic pollutant (POP) exposure was positively associated with T2D in a dose-response manner. Stronger positive associations were found among females (OR = 14.96 (3.72-60.11)) than in males (OR = 2.85 (1.14-8.04)). The breakpoints for DDE and PCB intake were 2.11 ng/kg/day and 1.47 ng/kg/day, respectively. Each further 1 ng/kg/day increase in DDE and PCB intake increased the risk of T2D with ORs 2.29 (1.26-4.17) and 1.44 (1.09-1.89), respectively. Our findings suggest that the balance of risk and benefits associated with fish consumption is highly dependent on the regional POP concentrations in fish.
Notes
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2016 Nov;124(11):1694-1699 PMID 27203433
Cites: Endocr Rev. 2014 Aug;35(4):557-601 PMID 24483949
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2013;76(12):701-15 PMID 23980837
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Sep;118(9):1235-42 PMID 20444671
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Oct 02;10(10):e0139565 PMID 26431431
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jun;111(8):994-1006 PMID 12826473
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Sep;90(3):613-20 PMID 19625683
Cites: Endocr Connect. 2015 Mar;4(1):R1-R15 PMID 25385852
Cites: Rev Environ Health. 2016 Mar;31(1):115-9 PMID 26943594
Cites: Epidemiology. 2006 Jul;17(4):352-9 PMID 16755267
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2009 Nov;32(11):2021-6 PMID 19675200
Cites: PLoS One. 2011 Jan 26;6(1):e15977 PMID 21298090
Cites: Environ Res. 2014 Oct;134:57-65 PMID 25046813
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2016 Jul;58(7):668-75 PMID 27253230
Cites: J Nutr. 2013 Jun;143(6):923-30 PMID 23616502
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Apr 13;11(4):e0152763 PMID 27073876
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Sep;64(4):396-408 PMID 16277123
Cites: Environ Res. 2015 Jul;140:335-44 PMID 25913152
Cites: Environ Res. 2017 Jul;156:725-737 PMID 28482294
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Jul;117(7):1076-82 PMID 19654916
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Mar 05;9(3):e90351 PMID 24598815
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2017 Jul;74(7):521-527 PMID 28438788
Cites: Diabetes. 2011 Jul;60(7):1838-48 PMID 21709279
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Feb;121(2):153-61 PMID 23131992
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2017 Mar;56(2):843-852 PMID 26687687
Cites: J Nutr. 2007 Apr;137(4):1110-4 PMID 17374689
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Feb 24;9(2):e89845 PMID 24587071
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Jul;121(7):774-83 PMID 23651634
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2014 Jun;17(6):1337-41 PMID 23517921
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011 Sep;65(9):1005-15 PMID 21731035
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Dec;6(12 ):3179-89 PMID 20049255
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2006 Jul;29(7):1638-44 PMID 16801591
Cites: Am J Med. 2014 Sep;127(9):848-57.e2 PMID 24802020
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Oct;96(4):706-13 PMID 22894940
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Aug;94(2):543-51 PMID 21677058
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 May;120(5):727-32 PMID 22334129
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Sep;94(3):884-91 PMID 21775559
Cites: Environ Res. 1999 Feb;80(2 Pt 2):S97-S103 PMID 10092423
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Jun;6(6):1894-916 PMID 19578467
Cites: Free Radic Biol Med. 2013 Dec;65:1557-64 PMID 23597503
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2015 Jun;28(3):262-71 PMID 24852202
Cites: Environ Health. 2005 Nov 29;4:28 PMID 16316471
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2008 Aug;31(8):1574-9 PMID 18487481
Cites: Chemosphere. 2009 May;75(5):674-9 PMID 19157498
Cites: Biochem J. 2017 Mar 24;474(8):1321-1332 PMID 28341729
Cites: JAMA. 2014 Dec 10;312(22):2401-2 PMID 25490331
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2012 Jun;107(12):1812-22 PMID 22017804
Cites: Int J Mol Sci. 2014 May 05;15(5):7787-811 PMID 24802877
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010 Mar;64(3):190-2 PMID 20203120
Cites: Mar Environ Res. 2002 Jun;53(5):425-52 PMID 12054104
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2010 Sep 15;408(20):4532-41 PMID 20673961
Cites: J Nutr. 2005 Nov;135(11):2639-43 PMID 16251623
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e44525 PMID 22984522
Cites: Diabetologia. 2008 Aug;51(8):1416-22 PMID 18560802
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Oct;115(10):1442-7 PMID 17938733
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e25170 PMID 21966444
Cites: Diabetes Metab. 2003 Dec;29(6):635-42 PMID 14707894
Cites: Int J Androl. 2008 Apr;31(2):201-8 PMID 18315718
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Jan;93(1):143-50 PMID 20980491
Cites: Health Econ. 2009 Apr;18 Suppl 1:S37-54 PMID 19294637
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2016 Sep;124(9):1376-83 PMID 27035469
Cites: Diabetes Metab. 2015 Apr;41(2):107-15 PMID 25454091
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Apr;118(4):465-71 PMID 20064776
Cites: Environ Int. 2017 Apr;101:183-189 PMID 28202225
Cites: BMJ. 2012 Oct 30;345:e6698 PMID 23112118
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2009 Oct;32(10):1857-63 PMID 19592633
Cites: Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2009 Mar;12(2):138-46 PMID 19202385
Cites: Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2003 Dec;38(3):336-44 PMID 14623484
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 Sep;92(9):1485-90 PMID 12197981
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Sep 5;163(5):561-6 PMID 11006768
Cites: Environ Res. 2017 Jan;152:470-477 PMID 27297029
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 1994 Jul 11;151(2):131-52 PMID 8073264
Cites: Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2009 Sep-Oct;52(2):95-114 PMID 19732603
Cites: Environ Res. 2012 Oct;118:107-11 PMID 22818202
PubMed ID
29562596 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Relationship between Persistent Organic Pollutants Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes among First Nations in Ontario and Manitoba, Canada: A Difference in Difference Analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296631
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 03 17; 15(3):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-17-2018
Author
Lesya Marushka
Xuefeng Hu
Malek Batal
Tonio Sadik
Harold Schwartz
Amy Ing
Karen Fediuk
Constantine Tikhonov
Hing Man Chan
Author Affiliation
Biology Department, University of Ottawa, 180 Gendron Hall, 30 Marie Curie, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada. lmaru073@uottawa.ca.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 03 17; 15(3):
Date
03-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Female
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Prevalence
Abstract
We previously studied the association between fish consumption and prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Manitoba and Ontario First Nations (FNs), Canada and found different results. In this study, we used a difference in difference model to analyze the data. Dietary and health data from the First Nations Food Nutrition and Environment Study, a cross-sectional study of 706 Manitoba and 1429 Ontario FNs were analyzed. The consumption of fish was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Fish samples were analyzed for dichloro diphenyldichloro ethylene (DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) content. Difference in difference model results showed that persistent organic pollutant (POP) exposure was positively associated with T2D in a dose-response manner. Stronger positive associations were found among females (OR = 14.96 (3.72-60.11)) than in males (OR = 2.85 (1.14-8.04)). The breakpoints for DDE and PCB intake were 2.11 ng/kg/day and 1.47 ng/kg/day, respectively. Each further 1 ng/kg/day increase in DDE and PCB intake increased the risk of T2D with ORs 2.29 (1.26-4.17) and 1.44 (1.09-1.89), respectively. Our findings suggest that the balance of risk and benefits associated with fish consumption is highly dependent on the regional POP concentrations in fish.
PubMed ID
29562596 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk assessment of dietary lead exposure among First Nations people living on-reserve in Ontario, Canada using a total diet study and a probabilistic approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286494
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2017 Oct 05;344:55-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-05-2017
Author
Amanda K Juric
Malek Batal
Will David
Donald Sharp
Harold Schwartz
Amy Ing
Karen Fediuk
Andrew Black
Constantine Tikhonov
Hing Man Chan
Laurie Chan
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2017 Oct 05;344:55-63
Date
Oct-05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Indigenous peoples have elevated risk of lead (Pb) exposure as hunted traditional food can be contaminated with lead-containing ammunition. Recent scientific consensus states that there is no threshold level for Pb exposure. The objective of this study was to estimate dietary exposure to Pb among First Nations living on-reserve in the province of Ontario, Canada. A total diet study was constructed based on a 24-h recall and Pb concentrations for traditional foods from the First Nations Food, Nutrition, and Environment Study (FNFNES) and Pb concentrations in market foods from Health Canada. A probabilistic assessment of annual and seasonal traditional food consumption was conducted. Results indicate that traditional foods, particularly moose and deer meat. are the primary source of dietary Pb intake (73%), despite providing only 1.8% of the average caloric intake. The average dietary Pb exposure (0.21µg/kg/d) in the First Nations population in Ontario was 1.7 times higher than the dietary Pb exposure in the general Canadian population. Pb intake was associated with an estimated average increase in systolic blood pressure of 1.2mmHg. These results indicate that consumption of foods hunted with Pb containing ammunition and shot puts the population at elevated risk of Pb toxicity.
PubMed ID
29031094 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk assessment of dietary lead exposure among First Nations people living on-reserve in Ontario, Canada using a total diet study and a probabilistic approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294827
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2018 Feb 15; 344:55-63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-15-2018
Author
Amanda K Juric
Malek Batal
Will David
Donald Sharp
Harold Schwartz
Amy Ing
Karen Fediuk
Andrew Black
Constantine Tikhonov
Hing Man Chan
Laurie Chan
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2018 Feb 15; 344:55-63
Date
Feb-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Diet
Drinking Water - analysis
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Firearms
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Lead - analysis - toxicity
Meat - analysis
Monte Carlo Method
Ontario
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Indigenous peoples have elevated risk of lead (Pb) exposure as hunted traditional food can be contaminated with lead-containing ammunition. Recent scientific consensus states that there is no threshold level for Pb exposure. The objective of this study was to estimate dietary exposure to Pb among First Nations living on-reserve in the province of Ontario, Canada. A total diet study was constructed based on a 24-h recall and Pb concentrations for traditional foods from the First Nations Food, Nutrition, and Environment Study (FNFNES) and Pb concentrations in market foods from Health Canada. A probabilistic assessment of annual and seasonal traditional food consumption was conducted. Results indicate that traditional foods, particularly moose and deer meat. are the primary source of dietary Pb intake (73%), despite providing only 1.8% of the average caloric intake. The average dietary Pb exposure (0.21µg/kg/d) in the First Nations population in Ontario was 1.7 times higher than the dietary Pb exposure in the general Canadian population. Pb intake was associated with an estimated average increase in systolic blood pressure of 1.2mmHg. These results indicate that consumption of foods hunted with Pb containing ammunition and shot puts the population at elevated risk of Pb toxicity.
PubMed ID
29031094 View in PubMed
Less detail

13 records – page 1 of 2.