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Brachial neuropraxia in Canadian Atlantic University sport football players: what is the incidence of "stingers"?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120419
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2012 Nov;22(6):472-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Rebecca M E Charbonneau
Sonja A McVeigh
Kara Thompson
Author Affiliation
Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. rebecca.charbonneau@dal.ca
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2012 Nov;22(6):472-7
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Body mass index
Brachial Plexus Neuritis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Football - injuries
Humans
Incidence
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Paresthesia - epidemiology
Resistance Training
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Universities - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the incidence of brachial neuropraxia (stingers) among varsity football players during the 2010 season; (2) to determine if associations exist between sustaining a stinger and previous history of stingers, years played, equipment, age, body mass index (BMI), and conditioning; and (3) to provide descriptive statistics regarding stingers and position played, symptoms, activity during injury, mechanism of tackling, and reporting of stingers.
Retrospective.
Canadian Atlantic University Sport football league.
Two hundred forty-four players.
Two written questionnaires.
Number of players experiencing stingers that occurred during the 2010 season.
The incidence was 26% (64 of 244). A multivariate analysis revealed that previous history of a stinger (P
PubMed ID
23006981 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Alcohol Policy Evaluation project: Findings from a review of provincial and territorial alcohol policies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303601
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2021 Feb 04; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-04-2021
Author
Kate Vallance
Tim Stockwell
Ashley Wettlaufer
Clifton Chow
Norman Giesbrecht
Nicole April
Mark Asbridge
Russell Callaghan
Samantha Cukier
Geoff Hynes
Robert Mann
Robert Solomon
Gerald Thomas
Kara Thompson
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada.
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2021 Feb 04; :
Date
Feb-04-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Effective alcohol control measures can prevent and reduce alcohol-related harms at the population level. This study aims to evaluate implementation of alcohol policies across 11 evidence-based domains in Canada's 13 jurisdictions.
The Canadian Alcohol Policy Evaluation project assessed all provinces and territories on 11 evidence-based domains weighted for scope and effectiveness. A scoring rubric was developed with policy and practice indicators and peer-reviewed by international experts. The 2017 data were collected from publicly-available regulatory documents, validated by government officials, and independently scored by team members.
The average score for alcohol policy implementation across Canadian provinces and territories was 43.8%; Ontario had the highest (63.9%) and Northwest Territories the lowest (38.4%) jurisdictional scores. Only six of 11 policy domains had average scores above 50% with Monitoring and Reporting scoring the highest (62.8%) and Health and Safety Messaging the lowest (25.7%). A 2017 provincial/territorial current best practice score of 86.6% was calculated taking account of the highest scores for any individual policy indicators implemented in at least one jurisdiction across the country.
Most of the evidence-based alcohol policies assessed by the Canadian Alcohol Policy Evaluation project were not implemented across Canadian provinces and territories as of 2017, and many provinces showed declining scores since 2012. However, the majority of policies assessed have been implemented in at least one jurisdiction. Improved alcohol policies to reduce related harm are therefore achievable and could be implemented consistently across Canada.
PubMed ID
33543532 View in PubMed
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Efficacy and retention of the French-Canadian version of the wheelchair skills training program for manual wheelchair users: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125297
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 Jun;93(6):940-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
François Routhier
R Lee Kirby
Louise Demers
Malgorzata Depa
Kara Thompson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation and Social Integration, Institut de réadaptation en déficience physique de Québec, Québec City, Québec, Canada. Francois.Routhier@rea.ulaval.ca
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 Jun;93(6):940-8
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Skills - physiology
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Patient Safety
Physical Therapy Modalities
Program Evaluation
Quality Control
Quebec
Reference Values
Retention (Psychology) - physiology
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Single-Blind Method
Statistics, nonparametric
Task Performance and Analysis
Wheelchairs - psychology - utilization
Abstract
To test the hypotheses that, in comparison with a control group that received standard care, users of manual wheelchairs who also received the French-Canadian version of the Wheelchair Skills Training Program (WSTP) would significantly improve their wheelchair-skills capacity and that these improvements would be retained at 3 months.
Multicenter, single-blind, randomized controlled trial.
Three rehabilitation centers in Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Manual wheelchair users (N=39), a sample of convenience.
Participants were randomly allocated to the WSTP or control groups. Participants in both groups received standard care. Participants in the WSTP group also received a mean of 5.9 training sessions (a mean total duration of 5h and 36min).
The French-Canadian version of the Wheelchair Skills Test (WST) (Version 3.2) was administered at evaluation at first time period (baseline) (t1), evaluation at second time period (posttraining) (t2) (a mean of 47d after t1), and at evaluation at third time period (follow-up) (t3) (a mean of 101d after t2).
At t2, the mean ± SD total percentage WST capacity scores were 77.4%±13.8% for the WSTP group and 69.8%±18.4% for the control group (P=.030). Most of this difference was due to the community-level skills (P=.002). The total and subtotal Wheelchair Skills Test scores at t3 decreased by =0.5% from the t2 values, but differences between groups at t3, adjusting for t1, did not reach statistical significance (P=.017 at a Bonferroni-adjusted a level of .005).
WSTP training improves wheelchair skills immediately after training, particularly at the community-skills level, but this study did not show statistically significant differences between the groups at 3 months.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22494946 View in PubMed
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Gout in the elderly--a population health study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152067
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Apr;36(4):822-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
John G Hanly
Chris Skedgel
Ingrid Sketris
Charmaine Cooke
Tina Linehan
Kara Thompson
Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, College of Pharmacy, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4K4, Canada. john.hanly@cdha.nshealth.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Apr;36(4):822-30
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Delivery of Health Care - economics - utilization
Female
Gout - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Insurance Coverage - economics
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Office Visits
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To determine the incidence, healthcare utilization, and costs in older adults with gout.
A 5-year retrospective case-control study of patients with incident gout and matched controls was performed. Study variables were derived from health administrative data and included patient demographics, International Classification of Diseases diagnostic codes, and healthcare cost information.
There were 4,071 cases and 16,281 controls, providing a 5-year incidence of gout of 4.4%. The mean (+/-SD) age (77+/-7.3 and 76+/-7.1 yrs) and the male:female ratio (1.0:1.04) were similar in both groups. Gout was diagnosed by family physicians (77%), nonrheumatology subspecialists (18%), general internists (4%), and rheumatologists (0.02%). Hospitalizations were significantly higher in cases (p
PubMed ID
19286852 View in PubMed
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The impact of warfarin use on clinical outcomes in atrial fibrillation: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163685
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 1;23(6):457-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2007
Author
Ratika Parkash
Vinnie Wee
Martin J Gardner
Jafna L Cox
Kara Thompson
Brenda Brownell
David R Anderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University and Capital Health, Halifax, Canada. ratika.parkash@cdha.nshealth.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 1;23(6):457-61
Date
May-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Aged
Ambulatory Care
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Thromboembolism - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Treatment Outcome
Warfarin - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common adult arrhythmia, and significantly increases the risk of ischemic stroke. Oral anticoagulation may be underused and may be less effective in community settings than clinical trial settings.
To determine the rates of thromboembolism and bleeding in an ambulatory cohort of patients with AF.
Observational study of Nova Scotian residents with AF identified by electrocardiogram in ambulatory settings between November 1999 and January 2001. Main outcome measures were rates of thromboembolism and bleeding over two years.
Four hundred twenty-five patients were included in the study. The mean (+/-SD) age was 70.6+/-11.1 years, and 40% were women. Warfarin therapy was used by 68% of patients. Sixty-two per cent of patients had hypertension, 21% had a previous stroke or transient ischemic attack, 44% had congestive heart failure and 20% were diabetic. The overall rate of thromboembolic events was 2.7% in warfarin users and 8.5% in nonwarfarin users over two years, with an RR reduction of 68% (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.91; P=0.047). The annual rate of ischemic stroke was 1.2% and 3.1% in warfarin and nonwarfarin users, respectively, with an RR reduction of 62% (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.08 to 1.04; P=0.057). The overall rate of major bleeding was 2.6% in warfarin users and 1.4% in nonwarfarin users (P=0.667). The annual mortality rate was 7.79% in warfarin users and 9.93% in nonwarfarin users (P=0.192).
Warfarin use was found to significantly reduce the rate of thromboembolic events without a concomitant increase in hemorrhagic events. The present study confirms the effectiveness of warfarin therapy in a population-based cohort.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17487290 View in PubMed
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Neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus: attribution and clinical significance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177637
Source
J Rheumatol. 2004 Nov;31(11):2156-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
John G Hanly
Grace McCurdy
Lisa Fougere
Jo-Anne Douglas
Kara Thompson
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center and Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. john.hanly@cdha.nshealth.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2004 Nov;31(11):2156-62
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Central Nervous System - pathology
Fatigue - etiology - pathology
Female
Health status
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Kidney Diseases - etiology - pathology
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - complications - drug therapy - pathology
Lupus Nephritis - complications - pathology
Lupus Vasculitis, Central Nervous System - etiology - pathology - physiopathology
Male
Nova Scotia
Peripheral Nervous System - pathology
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
To describe the range and attribution of neuropsychiatric (NP) disease in an unselected cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to examine the association with cumulative organ damage, medication use, and quality of life.
One hundred eleven patients with SLE in a single referral center were studied. NP syndromes were defined using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) nomenclature and case definitions. Overall disease activity was measured by the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI); cumulative organ damage was determined by the ACR/SLICC damage index; and quality of life by the SF-36.
Patients' mean age was 44.7 years, 87% were female, and 92% were Caucasian. The mean (+/- SE) disease duration was 10.1 +/- 0.7 years. A total of 74 NP events were identified in 41 of 111 (37%) patients. Thirteen of the 19 ACR NP syndromes were identified and 2 or more NP manifestations occurred in 56% of patients. Central nervous system manifestations accounted for 92% of the events compared to involvement of the peripheral nervous system in 8%. Thirty-five (47%) of these events were attributed entirely to SLE, 30 (41%) were attributed exclusively to non-SLE factors, and in the remaining 9 events (12%) both SLE and non-SLE factors were felt to be contributory. Cumulative organ damage was higher in patients with NP disease, although this was not statistically significant and they were more likely to have received prednisone or immunosuppressive drugs (p
Notes
Comment In: J Rheumatol. 2004 Nov;31(11):2093-815517616
PubMed ID
15517627 View in PubMed
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Patient outcomes, economic benefits associated with a heparin change in hemodialysis, and nurses' satisfaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131186
Source
Nephrol Nurs J. 2011 Jul-Aug;38(4):339-48
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bernadette A M Chevalier
Shawna Hudson
Kara Thompson
Charles Constantine
Author Affiliation
Capital Health, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Nephrol Nurs J. 2011 Jul-Aug;38(4):339-48
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticoagulants - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Drug Costs
Drug Substitution - economics
Female
Heparin - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Renal Dialysis - economics - nursing
Abstract
Heparin is commonly administered during hemodialysis to prevent clotting in the extracorporeal circuit. The authors' unit instituted a change in heparin type and preparation procedure based on patient safety and potential cost savings. Fifty patient charts were reviewed to determine whether the change affected specific patient outcomes. Economic impact measures included drug, supply, and labor costs. No changes in hemodialysis efficacy or rates of adverse events were observed. Annual cost savings were estimated to be $81,627 USD.
PubMed ID
21928610 View in PubMed
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Population-based evaluation of the management of antithrombotic therapy for atrial fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175674
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Mar;21(3):257-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
David R Anderson
Martin J Gardner
Wayne Putnam
Davinder Jassal
Brenda Brownell
Gordon Flowerdew
Seema Nagpal
Kara Thompson
Jafna L Cox
Author Affiliation
Queen Elizabeth II Health Science Centre, Halifax, Canada. david.anderson@dal.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Mar;21(3):257-66
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Community Health Planning
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Prescriptions - standards - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - standards - statistics & numerical data
Education, Medical
Educational Status
Electrocardiography
Family Practice - education - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Guideline Adherence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Medicine - standards - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Specialization
Thrombosis - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Oral anticoagulation is an effective therapy for the prevention of cardioembolic complications in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, previous practice reviews have indicated that oral anticoagulants are often underused in this setting. Most of those reports have focused on reviews of hospitalized and institutionalized patients, or small geographical areas.
To determine the use of antithrombotic therapy for the treatment of atrial fibrillation in Nova Scotia and to survey the knowledge of antithrombotic therapy for atrial fibrillation among a concurrent cohort of primary care and specialist physicians involved in the management of patients with atrial fibrillation.
Patients with atrial fibrillation were identified through outpatient electrocardiography clinics held throughout Nova Scotia. Following consent of the primary care physicians, patients were contacted and completed a survey about their current management. Family physicians and specialists in Nova Scotia were also surveyed about the management of atrial fibrillation with antithrombotic therapy through the receipt of one of four case scenarios.
Four hundred twenty-five patients participated in the cross-sectional survey. The mean patient age was 70.6 years, 255 (60%) were male and 398 (93.6%) had at least one risk factor for stroke in addition to atrial fibrillation. Two hundred ninety-four patients (69.2%) were receiving oral anticoagulants either alone (61.9%) or in combination with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) (7.3%). An additional 85 patients (20%) received ASA alone. There was no difference in the rates of prescription of oral anticoagulants between elderly patients (75 years of age and older) and those younger than 75 years (71.7% versus 67.3%, 95% CI -13.1% to 4.5%; P=0.34). Overall, 72.0% of patients were receiving antithrombotic therapy in accordance with the 2001 guidelines of the American College of Chest Physicians, with no difference in the rates between individuals younger than 75 years (72.2%) and those over 75 years of age (71.7%) (absolute difference -0.5%, 95% CI -9.2% to 8.1%). Physician responses to case scenarios indicated that knowledge was high among both general practitioners and specialists regarding the appropriate use of oral anticoagulants for the prevention of thrombotic complications associated with atrial fibrillation.
The appropriate use of oral antithrombotic therapy for the prevention of thrombotic complications of atrial fibrillation occurs in approximately 72% of patients studied in Nova Scotia, and physician knowledge about this indication is high. There was no bias against prescribing oral anticoagulants to elderly patients. The findings suggest that with time, education and evidence have positively impacted the use of antithrombotic therapy in these patients.
PubMed ID
15776115 View in PubMed
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Rates and predictors of manual and powered wheelchair use for persons with stroke: a retrospective study in a Canadian rehabilitation center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144311
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2010 Apr;91(4):639-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Anita D Mountain
R Lee Kirby
Donald A MacLeod
Kara Thompson
Author Affiliation
Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. abillard@dal.ca
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2010 Apr;91(4):639-43
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cohort Studies
Electric Power Supplies
Humans
Length of Stay
Middle Aged
Rehabilitation Centers
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stroke - rehabilitation
Time Factors
Wheelchairs - utilization
Abstract
To determine the rates of manual and powered wheelchair use at discharge for people with stroke admitted to a rehabilitation center and to determine whether any predictors of wheelchair use at discharge could be identified.
Retrospective cohort study.
Rehabilitation center.
Consecutive former inpatients (N=100) with a primary diagnosis of stroke, a sample of convenience.
None.
We reviewed the inpatient health records to determine the rates of wheelchair use at discharge and to record some readily available demographic and clinical data that might serve as predictors of wheelchair use.
At discharge, 40 people (40%) were using manual wheelchairs, 1 person (1%) was using a powered wheelchair, and 59 (59%) were not using a wheelchair. Of the patients who were walkers on admission (ie, walking FIM scores of 6 or 7), none (0%) used wheelchairs at discharge. Of those with nonwalking FIM scores (1-5) on admission, 56% were using wheelchairs at discharge. Multivariate analyses revealed that the adjusted odds ratios of using a wheelchair (manual or powered) were 3.33 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-8.33) for those with left-hemisphere versus right-hemisphere strokes (P=.010), .94 (CI, .91-.96) for each point rise in the total raw FIM score on admission (P
PubMed ID
20382299 View in PubMed
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Routine cardiac evaluation in patients with early-stage breast cancer before adjuvant chemotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128957
Source
Clin Breast Cancer. 2012 Feb;12(1):4-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Alwin Jeyakumar
Jillian DiPenta
Stephanie Snow
Daniel Rayson
Kara Thompson
Chris Theriault
Tallal Younis
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. alwin.jeyakumar@cdha.nshealth.ca
Source
Clin Breast Cancer. 2012 Feb;12(1):4-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthracyclines - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - pathology
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Female
Heart Diseases - radionuclide imaging
Humans
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Nova Scotia
Physician's Practice Patterns
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
This population-based study of women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer aimed to (i) determine the current utilization pattern of multigated acquisition (MUGA) scans before adjuvant chemotherapy (AdjC) treatment, and (ii) examine the impact of MUGA scan results on AdjC decision making.
All women who underwent curative-intent surgery for stage I-III breast cancer between October 2005 and September 2006 in Nova Scotia, Canada, were identified through the provincial cancer registry. A retrospective chart review was performed to abstract all relevant clinical-pathologic variables, including baseline cardiac risk factors. The association between MUGA scan utilization and clinical-pathologic variables, as well as receipt and type of AdjC, was examined through univariate and multivariate analyses.
The study included 593 women, of whom 238 (40%) received AdjC (94% anthracycline vs. 6% nonanthracycline) and 198 (33%) underwent baseline MUGA scans. Of those received AdjC, 80% underwent MUGA scans. MUGA scan utilization was associated with AdjC treatment (yes vs. no; P 65 years of age. In the 1 patient
PubMed ID
22154116 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.