Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 2.

Alcohol consumption, abstaining, health utility, and quality of life--a general population survey in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159002
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2008 May-Jun;43(3):376-86
Publication Type
Article
Author
Samuli I Saarni
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Seppo Koskinen
Jaana Suvisaari
Sami Pirkola
Harri Sintonen
Kari Poikolainen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, Helsinki, Finland. samuli.saarni@helsinki.fi
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2008 May-Jun;43(3):376-86
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Temperance - psychology
Abstract
To examine the associations between alcohol consumption and utility-based health-related quality of life (HRQoL), subjective quality of life (QoL), self-rated health (SRH), and mental distress.
Representative general population survey in Finland, with 5871 persons aged 30-64 years. HRQoL was measured with two health utility instruments (15D and EQ-5D), QoL and SRH were measured with RATING scales, and mental distress with a General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Past alcohol problems were diagnosed with a structured psychiatric interview known as the composite international diagnostic interview (CIDI). Alcohol consumption was examined with a self-report questionnaire.
Negative associations between alcohol and well-being were observed on several measures for women consuming more than 173 g and men more than 229 g per week. Former drinkers scored worst on most measures, even in comparison to the highest drinking decile. For men, all statistically significant associations between moderate drinking and well-being disappeared when sociodemographic factors and former drinkers were controlled for. For women, moderate alcohol use associated with better SRH and EQ-5D as compared to abstainers. However, the possible health utility benefits associated with moderate alcohol consumption were of clinically insignificant magnitude.
Failure to separate former drinkers and other abstainers produces a significant bias favoring moderate drinkers. As the possible health utility benefits of moderate alcohol use were clinically insignificant, it suffices to investigate mortality, when estimating the public health impact of moderate alcohol consumption using quality-adjusted life years.
PubMed ID
18245136 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol-related deaths and social factors in depression mortality: a register-based follow-up of depressed in-patients and antidepressant users in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116810
Source
J Affect Disord. 2013 Jun;148(2-3):278-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Heta Moustgaard
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Sinikka Sihvo
Pekka Martikainen
Author Affiliation
Population Research Unit, Department of Social Research, PO Box 18, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. heta.moustgaard@helsinki.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2013 Jun;148(2-3):278-85
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol-Related Disorders - mortality
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cause of Death - trends
Depression - drug therapy - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Excess mortality of depression is established for various causes of death, but evidence is scarce on alcohol-related causes. It also remains unclear whether the magnitude of the excess varies by social factors. This study aimed to quantify the contribution of alcohol-related causes of death and to assess modifying effects of socioeconomic position, employment status, and living arrangements in the excess mortality of depression.
A 14% sample of community-dwelling Finns aged 40-64 at the end of 1997 was assessed for depression, using register data on psychiatric hospital care and antidepressant use in 1996-1997. Depressed in-patients (n=897), out-patients using antidepressants (n=13,658), and non-depressed individuals (n=217,140) were followed up for cause-specific mortality in 1998-2007, distinguishing between alcohol- and non-alcohol-related deaths, and testing for variation in the excess mortality according to baseline social factors.
Depressed in- and out-patients had significant excess mortality for suicide (age-adjusted rate ratios RR=3.77 for men and RR=6.35 for women), all accidental and violent causes (RR=3.47 and RR=4.43), and diseases (RR=1.67 and RR=1.41). Of the excess, alcohol-related causes accounted for 50% among depressed men and 30% among women. Excess mortality varied little by social factors, particularly in non-alcohol-related causes. Where variation was significant, the relative excess was larger among those with higher socioeconomic position and the employed. Absolute excess was, however, larger among those with lower socioeconomic position, the unemployed, and the unpartnered.
Depression was measured indirectly by hospital and antidepressant use.
The results highlight the major role of alcohol in depression mortality.
PubMed ID
23357655 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressant sales and the risk for alcohol-related and non-alcohol-related suicide in Finland--an individual-level population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259868
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(6):e98405
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Heta Moustgaard
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Mikko Myrskylä
Pekka Martikainen
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(6):e98405
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohols - adverse effects
Antidepressive Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Commerce - economics
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Suicide - economics - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A marked decline in suicide rates has co-occurred with increased antidepressant sales in several countries but the causal connection between the trends remains debated. Most previous studies have focused on overall suicide rates and neglected differential effects in population subgroups. Our objective was to investigate whether increasing sales of non-tricyclic antidepressants have reduced alcohol- and non-alcohol-related suicide risk in different population subgroups.
We followed a nationally representative sample of 950,158 Finnish adults in 1995-2007 for alcohol-related (n = 2,859) and non-alcohol-related (n = 8,632) suicides. We assessed suicide risk by gender and social group according to regional sales of non-tricyclic antidepressants, measured by sold doses per capita, prevalence of antidepressant users, and proportion of antidepressant users with doses reflecting minimally adequate treatment. Fixed-effects Poisson regression models controlled for regional differences and time trends that may influence suicide risk irrespective of antidepressant sales.
The number of sold antidepressant doses per capita and the prevalence of antidepressant users were unrelated to male suicide risk. However, one percentage point increase in the proportion of antidepressant users receiving minimally adequate treatment reduced non-alcohol-related male suicide risk by one percent (relative risk 0.987, 95% confidence interval 0.976-0.998). This beneficial effect only emerged among men with high education, high income, and employment, among men without a partner, and men not owning their home. Alcohol-related suicides and female suicides were unrelated to all measures of antidepressant sales.
We found little evidence that increase in overall sales or in the prevalence of non-tricyclic antidepressant users would have caused the fall in suicide rates in Finland in 1995-2007. However, the rise in the proportion of antidepressant users receiving minimally adequate treatment, possibly due to enhanced treatment compliance, may have prevented non-alcohol-related suicides among men.
Notes
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2005 Mar;83(3):171-715798840
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2005 May;62(5):325-915837854
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;188:354-816582062
Cites: J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2006 Dec;26(6):643-717110823
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2007 Feb;98(1-2):109-1516956665
Cites: Psychol Med. 2007 Mar;37(3):373-8217121686
Cites: Public Health. 2007 Apr;121(4):274-717316717
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2007 Apr;68(4):505-1117474804
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2007 Sep;102(1-3):1-917223200
Cites: Harv Rev Psychiatry. 2007 Jul-Aug;15(4):133-4517687708
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2008 Sep;110(1-2):94-10518276016
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Feb 3;180(3):291-719188627
Cites: J Health Econ. 2009 May;28(3):659-7619324439
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jun;68(12):2161-919409682
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Jun;196(6):429-3320513850
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:6220691035
Cites: Alcohol. 2012 Sep;46(6):529-3622579734
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2013 Jun;148(2-3):278-8523357655
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2000 Nov;102(5):354-811098807
Cites: Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 2001 Sep;42:S4-811532820
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2002;28(4):637-4712795496
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Aug;57(4):595-61112821009
Cites: Eur Psychiatry. 2003 Nov;18(7):325-814643559
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):36-407754784
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1998 Jul;173:11-539850203
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2004 Nov;65(11):1456-6215554756
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;62(2):165-7215699293
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Feb 19;330(7488):38515718537
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Feb 19;330(7488):39615718539
PubMed ID
24892560 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does hospital admission risk for depression vary across social groups? A population-based register study of 231,629 middle-aged Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113561
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Jan;49(1):15-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Heta Moustgaard
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Pekka Martikainen
Author Affiliation
Population Research Unit, Department of Social Research, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 59, 00014, Helsinki, Finland, heta.moustgaard@helsinki.fi.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Jan;49(1):15-25
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Depression - drug therapy - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Social Class
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Evidence on social differentials in depression outcomes remains inconsistent. We assess social predictors of psychiatric admission for depression in a community setting.
A register-based 14% sample of community-dwelling Finns aged 40-64 at the end of 1997 was assessed for depression and psychiatric comorbidity, using register data on psychiatric hospital care and medication purchases in 1996-1997. Those with inpatient treatment for unipolar depression (n = 846), those with antidepressant treatment (n = 8,754), and those with neither (n = 222,029) were followed for psychiatric admission with a diagnosis of unipolar depression in 1998-2003. Differentials in admission rates by socioeconomic position, employment status, and living arrangements were studied using Cox proportional hazards modelling.
Among those with prior inpatient or antidepressant treatment, the material aspects of socioeconomic position increased admission risk for depression by 20-40%, even after controlling for baseline depression severity and psychiatric comorbidities, whereas education and occupational social class were unrelated to admission risk. Among inpatients, also having no partner, and among antidepressant users, being previously married and living without co-resident children increased admission risk. However, among inpatients few excess risks reached statistical significance. Among those with no inpatient or antidepressant treatment, all measures of low social position and not living with a partner predicted admission, and the factors had more predictive power in admission than among those with prior treatment.
Further studies should disentangle the mechanisms behind the higher admission risk among those with fewer economic resources and no co-resident partner.
PubMed ID
23712515 View in PubMed
Less detail

Living alone and antidepressant medication use: a prospective study in a working-age population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125884
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:236
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Mika Kivimäki
Kirsi Ahola
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Marko Elovainio
Helena Rossi
Sampsa Puttonen
Seppo Koskinen
Erkki Isometsä
Jouko Lönnqvist
Marianna Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, 00250 Helsinki, Finland. laura.pulkki-raback@helsinki.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:236
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cluster analysis
Drug Utilization
Educational Status
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Psychosocial Deprivation
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
An increasing proportion of the population lives in one-person households. The authors examined whether living alone predicts the use of antidepressant medication and whether socioeconomic, psychosocial, or behavioral factors explain this association.
The participants were a nationally representative sample of working-age Finns from the Health 2000 Study, totaling 1695 men and 1776 women with a mean age of 44.6 years. In the baseline survey in 2000, living arrangements (living alone vs. not) and potential explanatory factors, including psychosocial factors (social support, work climate, hostility), sociodemographic factors (occupational grade, education, income, unemployment, urbanicity, rental living, housing conditions), and health behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, obesity), were measured. Antidepressant medication use was followed up from 2000 to 2008 through linkage to national prescription registers.
Participants living alone had a 1.81-fold (CI = 1.46-2.23) higher purchase rate of antidepressants during the follow-up period than those who did not live alone. Adjustment for sociodemographic factors attenuated this association by 21% (adjusted OR = 1.64, CI = 1.32-2.05). The corresponding attenuation was 12% after adjustment for psychosocial factors (adjusted OR = 1.71, CI = 1.38-2.11) and 9% after adjustment for health behaviors (adjusted OR = 1.74, CI = 1.41-2.14). Gender-stratified analyses showed that in women the greatest attenuation was related to sociodemographic factors and in men to psychosocial factors.
These data suggest that people living alone may be at increased risk of developing mental health problems. The public health value is in recognizing that people who live alone are more likely to have material and psychosocial problems that may contribute to excess mental health problems in this population group.
Notes
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2008 Sep;110(1-2):94-10518276016
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2008 Jul;62(7):627-3318559446
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 2008;30:1-1418806255
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2009 May;115(1-2):36-4518722019
Cites: BMJ. 2009;339:b246219574312
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2009 Aug;66(8):848-5619652124
Cites: Depress Anxiety. 2009;26(11):1049-5919123456
Cites: Health Policy. 2009 Dec;93(2-3):172-919692141
Cites: PLoS Med. 2010 Jul;7(7):e100031620668659
Cites: Psychol Med. 2010 Sep;40(9):1495-50519939327
Cites: PLoS Med. 2011 Sep;8(9):e100109421949642
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Nov;46(11):1115-2520721527
Cites: Lancet. 2000 Apr 15;355(9212):1315-910776744
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Dec;158(12):2077-911729032
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2002 Mar;43(1):1-2111949193
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1996 Jul;43(1):113-238816016
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1998 Mar;51(3):273-839495693
Cites: J Occup Health Psychol. 1998 Oct;3(4):322-559805280
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2005 Jan;40(1):1-1015624068
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;62(6):617-2715939839
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2006 Feb;41(2):122-916467954
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Jun;60(6):468-7516698975
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2006 Oct;16(5):476-8316601112
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2007 Feb;98(1-2):109-1516956665
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2007 Mar;98(3):189-9717182105
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2008 May 15;167(10):1152-418413360
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2008 Apr;35(2):239-4418347896
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2007 Feb;33(1):29-3617353962
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2008 May 15;167(10):1143-5118413361
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2008 Oct;110(3):234-4018295901
PubMed ID
22443226 View in PubMed
Less detail

Living arrangements and mental health in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169281
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Jun;60(6):468-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Tuija Martelin
Pekka Martikainen
Sami Pirkola
Seppo Koskinen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute (KTL), Department of Health and Functional Capacity, Mannerheimintie 166, 00300 Helsinki, Finland. kaisla.joutsenniemi@ktl.fi
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Jun;60(6):468-75
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Marital status
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Retrospective Studies
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Abstract
Non-married persons are known to have poor mental health compared with married persons. Health differences between marital status groups may largely arise from corresponding differences in interpersonal social bonds. However, official marital status mirrors the social reality of persons to a decreasing extent, and living arrangements may be a better measure of social bonds. Little is known about mental health in different living arrangement groups. This study aims to establish the extent and determinants of mental health differences by living arrangement in terms of psychological distress (GHQ) and DSM-IV psychiatric disorders (CIDI).
Data were used from the nationally representative cross sectional health 2000 survey, conducted in 2000-1 in Finland. Altogether 4685 participants (80%) aged 30-64 years were included in these analyses; comprehensive information was available on measures of mental health and living arrangements. Living arrangements were measured as follows: married, cohabiting, living with other(s) than a partner, and living alone.
Compared with the married, persons living alone and those living with other(s) than a partner were approximately twice as likely to have anxiety or depressive disorders. Cohabiters did not differ from the married. In men, psychological distress was similarly associated with living arrangements. Unemployment, lack of social support, and alcohol consumption attenuated the excess psychological distress and psychiatric morbidity of persons living alone and of those living with other(s) than a partner by about 10%-50% each.
Living arrangements are strongly associated with mental health, particularly among men. Information on living arrangements, social support, unemployment, and alcohol use may facilitate early stage recognition of poor mental health in primary health care.
Notes
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2000 Sep;102(3):178-8411008852
Cites: Popul Stud (Camb). 2005 Mar;59(1):99-11515764137
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2000 Nov;35(11):508-1211197926
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(3):191-811827614
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2002 Feb;31(1):248-5511914328
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2002 Mar;43(1):1-2111949193
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2002 Aug;55(4):673-912188471
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2002 Oct;106(4):303-1312225498
Cites: Psychol Med. 2003 Feb;33(2):299-30612622308
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2003 May;38(5):229-3712719837
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2003 May;38(5):249-5512719840
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jun 18;289(23):3095-10512813115
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2003 Aug;38(8):442-912910340
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2003 Nov;183:384-9714594912
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Jan;58(1):53-814684727
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Jan;61(1):28-3314706941
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2004 Jan;49(1):37-4414763676
Cites: Arch Womens Ment Health. 2004 Apr;7(2):133-4815083348
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1981 Aug;71(8):802-97258441
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):401-61536356
Cites: Int J Health Serv. 1992;22(2):261-741601545
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1992 Mar;34(5):523-321604359
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1995 May;40(9):1221-97610428
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1995 Oct;49(5):482-87499990
Cites: Psychol Med. 1997 Jan;27(1):191-79122299
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Jan;44(2):241-99015876
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Nov;33(11):568-789803825
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Dec;33(12):587-959857791
Cites: J Public Health Med. 1999 Sep;21(3):283-810528955
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2005 Jan;84(1):77-8315620388
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2005 Jan;40(1):1-1015624068
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2005 Jan;60(1):S21-915643043
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;162(2):250-615677587
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2000 Sep;41(3):241-5511011503
PubMed ID
16698975 View in PubMed
Less detail

Living arrangements, heavy drinking and alcohol dependence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164584
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2007 Sep-Oct;42(5):480-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Tuija Martelin
Laura Kestilä
Pekka Martikainen
Sami Pirkola
Seppo Koskinen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute (KTL), Department of Health and Functional Capacity, Mannerheimintie 166, Helsinki, Finland. kaisla.joutsenniemi@ktl.fi
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2007 Sep-Oct;42(5):480-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Beverages
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Data Collection
Education
Family
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Religion
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Urbanization
Abstract
To assess the variation in heavy drinking and alcohol dependence by living arrangements, and the contribution of social and behavioural factors to this variation.
The Health 2000 survey is a nationally representative cross-sectional survey conducted in Finland in 2000-2001 (N = 4589 in the age-range of 30-54 years, response rate 81%).
Living arrangements; married, cohabiting, living with other(s) than a partner, and living alone. Consumption of beer, wine and spirits in the past month was converted into grams of alcohol/week, and heavy drinking was classified as > or =280 (men) and > or =140 (women) grams/week. Twelve-month prevalence of alcohol dependence was diagnosed by a mental health interview (CIDI).
As compared to the married, cohabiting and living alone associated with heavy drinking (age-adjusted OR; 95% CI: 1.71;1.17-2.49 and OR 2.15;1.55-3.00 in men; OR 1.54;0.96-2.46 and OR 1.67;1.07-2.63 in women) and alcohol dependence (OR 2.29;1.44-3.64 and OR 3.66;2.39-5.59 in men; OR 2.56;1.10-5.94 and OR 4.43;2.03-9.64 in women). Living with other(s) than a partner associated with heavy drinking. Those who cohabited without children or lived alone had the highest odds for alcohol dependence. Among both genders, adjusting for main activity and financial difficulties attenuated the odds for heavy drinking and alcohol dependence by approximately 5-30% each, and additionally among women adjusting for urbanisation attenuated the odds for heavy drinking by approximately 15-45%.
Cohabiting and living alone are associated with heavy drinking and alcohol dependence. Unemployment, financial difficulties and low social support, and among women also living in an urban area, seem to contribute to the excess risk.
PubMed ID
17369285 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mortality differences according to living arrangements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160540
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2007 Dec;36(6):1255-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Seppo Koskinen
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Tuija Martelin
Pekka Martikainen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Health and Functional Capacity, Helsinki, Finland. seppo.koskinen@ktl.fi
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2007 Dec;36(6):1255-64
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Censuses
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Mortality
Residence Characteristics
Risk Assessment - methods
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Research has revealed mortality differences between marital status groups in different societies and different periods of time. Due to the increase in consensual unions, living alone and other changes in living arrangements, it is necessary to apply a more detailed classification of living arrangements that incorporates partnership situation and household composition.
We analyse mortality by cause-of-death in the total Finnish population aged 30 or over in 1996-2000. The linked register dataset includes 15.7 million person-years and 210,139 deaths.
In the working aged population, cohabiters had nearly 70% excess mortality when compared with married people. Among working aged men living with someone other than a partner and among men living alone, mortality was three times higher than among married men. Among women, mortality in these groups was close to that of cohabiters. In the older population, mortality in the other groups was 15-40% higher than among married persons. Adjusting for education, social class and employment status attenuated the mortality differences by 7-31%. Having no children was associated with excess mortality in working aged women and men in each living arrangement group. The relative differences were greatest in deaths from alcohol-related causes, followed by deaths from accidents among men and working aged women and lung cancer in women.
We observed wide mortality differences according to living arrangements, particularly among the working aged. These differences were partly explained by socioeconomic factors. Excessive alcohol use seems to be one major cause of mortality differences.
PubMed ID
17971389 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Online therapies - what is known about their functionality].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268160
Source
Duodecim. 2015;131(13-14):1297-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jan-Henry Stenberg
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Matti Holi
Source
Duodecim. 2015;131(13-14):1297-301
Date
2015
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Depression - therapy
Finland
Humans
Internet
Motivation
Psychotherapy - methods
Telemedicine
Abstract
Online therapies are partly automated therapies, in which psychotherapeutic contents have been complemented with computer-aided presentational and educational contents, with a therapist giving support to the progress of the patient. As methods, these therapeutic programs incorporate therapeutic methods that have proven effective, such as remodeling of thoughts, activation of behavior and exposure, empathy, strengthening of cooperative relationship and motivation, and general support for self-reflection. For instance, online therapies already constitute part of the Finnish treatment guidelines on depression. Online therapies are available throughout Finland for the essential psychiatric illnesses.
PubMed ID
26536726 View in PubMed
Less detail

Parental use of antidepressant medication and family type in the risk for incident psychiatric morbidity in offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113592
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013 Aug;67(8):703-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Heta Moustgaard
Pekka Martikainen
Author Affiliation
Mental Health Problems and Substance Abuse Services Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. kaisla.joutsenniemi@icloud.com
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013 Aug;67(8):703-5
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Depression - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Family - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Morbidity
Parents - psychology
Poisson Distribution
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Maternal depression increases the risk for psychiatric morbidity in offspring but the effects of paternal depression and family type are less studied.
We assessed the effects of parental antidepressant use on offspring psychiatric morbidity in various family settings.
Our register-based study followed 132637 children for incident psychiatric morbidity in 1998-2003. The highest risk for psychiatric morbidity was in children living with both parents on antidepressants or with a lone parent on antidepressants. We found little variation in the effects according to parental or offspring gender.
Parental depression as measured by antidepressant use, and single parenthood pose a risk for psychiatric morbidity in offspring.
PubMed ID
23709664 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.