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Adult-onset asthma and occupational exposures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15626
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1999 Oct;25(5):430-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
K. Torén
B. Järvholm
J. Brisman
S. Hagberg
B A Hermansson
L. Lillienberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. Kjell.Toren@ymk.gu.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1999 Oct;25(5):430-5
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - classification
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dust - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study examined certain occupational exposures and the risk for adult-onset asthma. METHODS: A nested case-referent study of adult-onset asthma was performed on a random population sample (N=15813), aged 21 to 51 years. Cases for the study included 2 groups: subjects reporting "physician-diagnosed" asthma (N=251) and a broader "asthma" group (N=362). The "asthma" group consisted of subjects with "physician-diagnosed" asthma (N=251) and subjects reporting asthma-like symptoms without having "physician-diagnosed" asthma (N=111). The referents (N=2044) were randomly selected from the whole population sample. The case-referent sample was investigated with a comprehensive questionnaire about occupational exposures, asthma, respiratory symptoms, smoking, and atopy. Odds ratios were calculated with stratification for gender, year of diagnosis, and birth year. RESULTS: The highest odds ratio for "physician-diagnosed" asthma was associated with exposure to flour dust [odds ratio (OR) 2.8, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.5-5.2] and the occupational handling of resin-based paints (isocyanates) (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.6-5.9). Exposure to welding fumes, textile dust, and work with glues containing acrylates was also associated with an increased odds ratio for "physician-diagnosed" asthma. Including persons with asthma-like symptoms (ie, the asthma group) showed similar results. CONCLUSION: This population-based case-referent study from Sweden indicates that occupational exposure to acrylate-based compounds and welding fumes is associated with increased risk for adult-onset asthma.
PubMed ID
10569463 View in PubMed
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Airflow limitation and changes in pulmonary function among bleachery workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174038
Source
Eur Respir J. 2005 Jul;26(1):133-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
A J Mehta
P K Henneberger
K. Torén
A-C Olin
Author Affiliation
Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2005 Jul;26(1):133-9
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Airway Resistance
Case-Control Studies
Chlorine Compounds - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Industry
Lung Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Oxides - adverse effects
Ozone - adverse effects
Paper
Probability
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk assessment
Spirometry - methods
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated whether chronic airflow limitation and rapid decline in pulmonary function were associated with peak exposures to ozone and other irritant gases in pulp mills. Bleachery workers potentially exposed to irritant gassings (n = 178) from three Swedish pulp mills, and a comparison group of workers not exposed to irritant gassings (n = 54) from two paper mills, were studied. Baseline surveys occurred in 1995-1996, with follow-up surveys in 1998-1999. Participants performed spirometry and answered questions regarding ozone, chlorine dioxide (ClO2), and sulphur dioxide (SO2) gassings. From regression models controlling for potential confounders, declines in both the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (-24 mL x yr(-1)) and the forced vital capacity (FVC) (-19 mL x yr(-1)) were associated with ClO2/SO2 gassings. At follow-up, the prevalence of chronic airflow limitation (i.e. FEV1/FVC less than the lower limit of normal) was elevated for participants with only pre-baseline ozone gassings and with both pre-baseline and interval ozone gassings, after controlling for potential confounders. These findings suggest that obstructive effects among bleachery workers are associated with ozone gassings, and that adverse effects on spirometry might also accompany chlorine dioxide/sulphur dioxide gassings. Peak exposures to irritant gases in pulp mills should be prevented.
PubMed ID
15994400 View in PubMed
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Aspirin-intolerant asthma in the population: prevalence and important determinants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266365
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Jan;45(1):211-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
J. Eriksson
L. Ekerljung
A. Bossios
A. Bjerg
G. Wennergren
E. Rönmark
K. Torén
J. Lötvall
B. Lundbäck
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Jan;45(1):211-9
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Asthma, Aspirin-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Occupational Exposure
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Population-based studies on aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA) are very few, and no previous population study has investigated risk factors for the condition.
To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of AIA in the general population.
A questionnaire on respiratory health was mailed to 30,000 randomly selected subjects aged 16-75 years in West Sweden, 29,218 could be traced and 18,087 (62%) responded. The questionnaire included questions on asthma, respiratory symptoms, aspirin-induced dyspnoea and possible determinants.
The prevalence of AIA was 0.5%, 0.3% in men and 0.6% in women (P = 0.014). Sick leave, emergency visits due to asthma and all investigated lower respiratory symptoms were more common in AIA than in aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA). Obesity was a strong risk factor for AIA (BMI > 35: odds ratio (OR) 12.1; 95% CI 2.49-58.5), and there was a dose-response relationship between increasing body mass index (BMI) and risk of AIA. Obesity, airborne occupational exposure and visible mould at home were considerably stronger risk factors for AIA than for ATA. Current smoking was a risk factor for AIA (OR 2.55; 95% CI 1.47-4.42), but not ATA.
Aspirin-intolerant asthma identified in the general population was associated with a high burden of symptoms, uncontrolled disease and a high morbidity. Increasing BMI increased the risk of AIA in a dose-response manner. A number of risk factors, including obesity and current smoking, were considerably stronger for AIA than for ATA.
PubMed ID
24961377 View in PubMed
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The association between epidemiological measures of the occurrence of asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15693
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1998 Dec;2(12):1029-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
B. Järvholm
J. Brisman
K. Torén
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. bengt.jarvholm@envmed.umu.se
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1998 Dec;2(12):1029-36
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
SETTING: The prevalence of asthma is useful for studying the causes of asthma. OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether there is a relationship between the prevalence and incidence of asthma. DESIGN: The association between age and the occurrence of asthma was analysed in an epidemiological study of 15,813 persons. RESULTS: Different conclusions were reached depending on whether the point prevalence, cumulative prevalence or the incidence rates were studied. The relation between the incidence and prevalence of asthma is described in two epidemiological models, and none of the models seem to fit empirical data. Furthermore, it is shown that estimating incidence rates by prospectively measuring the point prevalences may introduce a considerable bias if the reliability of the diagnosis of asthma is around or below an agreement of 99%, which is probably usually the case. Including asthmatic symptoms during the last year in the definition of point prevalence means that there is no simple relation between incidence rates and point prevalences. CONCLUSION: The point prevalence may be a biased measure in the study of the etiology of asthma, as there is no simple relationship between the incidence and prevalence of asthma.
PubMed ID
9869121 View in PubMed
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Association of asthma and hay fever with irregular menstruation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15053
Source
Thorax. 2005 Jun;60(6):445-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
C. Svanes
F Gomez Real
T. Gislason
C. Jansson
R. Jögi
E. Norrman
L. Nyström
K. Torén
E. Omenaas
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway. cecilie.svanes@med.uib.no
Source
Thorax. 2005 Jun;60(6):445-50
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Menstruation Disturbances - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that asthmatic women are more likely to have abnormal sex hormone levels. A study was undertaken to determine whether asthma and allergy were associated with irregular menstruation in a general population, and the potential role of asthma medication for this association. METHODS: A total of 8588 women (response rate 77%) participated in an 8 year follow up postal questionnaire study of participants of the ECRHS stage I in Denmark, Estonia, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Only non-pregnant women not taking exogenous sex hormones were included in the analyses (n = 6137). RESULTS: Irregular menstruation was associated with asthma (OR 1.54 (95% CI 1.11 to 2.13)), asthma symptoms (OR 1.47 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.86)), hay fever (OR 1.29 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.57)), and asthma preceded by hay fever (OR 1.95 (95% CI 1.30 to 2.96)) among women aged 26-42 years. This was also observed in women not taking asthma medication (asthma symptoms: OR 1.44 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.91); hay fever: OR 1.27 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.58); wheeze preceded by hay fever: OR 1.76 (95% CI 1.18 to 2.64)). Irregular menstruation was associated with new onset asthma in younger women (OR 1.58 (95% CI 1.03 to 2.42)) but not in women aged 42-54 years (OR 0.62 (95% CI 0.32 to 1.18)). The results were consistent across centres. CONCLUSIONS: Younger women with asthma and allergy were more likely to have irregular menstruation. This could not be attributed to current use of asthma medication. The association could possibly be explained by common underlying metabolic or developmental factors. The authors hypothesise that insulin resistance may play a role in asthma and allergy.
Notes
Comment In: Thorax. 2005 Oct;60(10):793-416192360
PubMed ID
15923242 View in PubMed
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Association of respiratory symptoms and asthma with occupational exposures: findings from a population-based cross-sectional survey in Telemark, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287942
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 03 22;7(3):e014018
Publication Type
Article
Date
03-22-2017
Author
R. Abrahamsen
A K M Fell
M V Svendsen
E. Andersson
K. Torén
P K Henneberger
J. Kongerud
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 03 22;7(3):e014018
Date
03-22-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Respiratory Sounds
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and physician-diagnosed asthma and assess the impact of current occupational exposure.
Cross-sectional analyses of the prevalence of self-reported respiratory health and association with current occupational exposure in a random sample of the general population in Telemark County, Norway.
In 2013, a self-administered questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of the general population, aged 16-50, in Telemark, Norway. The overall response rate was 33%, comprising 16 099 responders.
The prevalence for respiratory symptoms and asthma, and OR of respiratory symptoms and asthma for occupational groups and exposures were calculated. Occupational exposures were assessed using self-reported exposure and an asthma-specific job-exposure matrix (JEM).
The prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma was 11.5%. For the occupational groups, the category with agriculture/fishery workers and craft/related trade workers was associated with wheezing and asthma attack in the past 12 months, showing OR 1.3 (1.1 to 1.6) and 1.9 (1.2 to 2.8), respectively. The group including technicians and associated professionals was also associated with wheezing OR 1.2 (1.0 to 1.3) and asthma attack OR 1.4 (1.1 to 1.9). The JEM data show that exposure to flour was associated with wheezing OR 3.2 (1.4 to 7.3) and woken with dyspnoea OR 3.5 (1.3 to 9.5), whereas exposures to diisocyanates, welding/soldering fumes and exposure to vehicle/motor exhaust were associated with dyspnoea OR 2.9 (1.5 to 5.7), 3.2 (1.6 to 6.4) and 1.4 (1.0 to 1.8), respectively.
The observed prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma was 11.5%. The 'manual' occupations were associated with respiratory symptoms. Occupational exposure to flour, diisocyanates, welding/soldering fumes and vehicle/motor exhaust was associated with respiratory symptoms in the past 12 months and use of asthma medication. However, prospective data are needed to confirm the observed associations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28336744 View in PubMed
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Asthma mortality and occupation in Sweden 1981-1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15797
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Jun;31(6):678-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
K. Torén
L G Hörte
Author Affiliation
Section of Occupational Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Jun;31(6):678-81
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agriculture
Asthma - mortality
Automobile Driving
Beauty Culture
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to investigate mortality attributable to asthma in different occupations. The mortality from asthma among Swedish workers between 1981 and 1992 was investigated by a linkage between official mortality statistics and the occupational information in the 1980 National Census. For each occupation, a smoking-adjusted standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated. The information about smoking habits was obtained from smoking surveys carried out from 1977 to 1979. Only occupations with more than five cases were considered in the analysis. Significantly increased mortality from asthma was found among male farmers (smoking-adjusted SMR = 146; 95% confidence interval [CI] 105-187) and male professional drivers (smoking-adjusted SMR = 144, 95% CI = 101-209) and female hairdressers (smoking-adjusted SMR = 332, 95% CI = 102-525). The increased mortality among three occupational groups (hairdressers, farmers, and professional drivers) out of 46 groups analyzed may be random occurrences. However, farmers and hairdressers are exposed to agents causing asthma, indicating that the increased mortality may be attributable to occupational exposure.
PubMed ID
9131221 View in PubMed
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Asthma-related work disability in Sweden. The impact of workplace exposures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15622
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1999 Dec;160(6):2028-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
P D Blanc
S. Ellbjär
C. Janson
D. Norbäck
E. Norrman
P. Plaschke
K. Torén
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medicine and the Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1999 Dec;160(6):2028-33
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Disability Evaluation
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - complications - diagnosis
Linear Models
Male
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Skin Tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Work disability due to respiratory disease, especially asthma, is common and costly among working age adults. The goal of this analysis was to characterize the risk factors for such disability. We analyzed data from the Swedish part of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS), a random population-based sample of adults age 20 to 44, enriched with symptomatic subjects at increased likelihood of having asthma. We analyzed structured interview data available for 2,065 subjects and further analyzed methacholine challenge and skin prick test data for 1,562 of these. We defined respiratory work disability as reported job change or work loss due to breathing affected by a job. We used binary generalized linear modeling with a log link to estimate disability risk. Eighty-four subjects (4%) reported such work disability. This increased to 13% among those with asthma (45 of 350 subjects). Adjusting for covariates, occupations at high risk for asthma were associated with disability (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1 to 3.0), as was self-reported regular exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) at work (PR 1.8; 95% CI 1.1 to 3.1) and self- reported job exposure to vapors, gases, dust, or fumes (VGDF) (PR 4.3; 95% CI 2.2 to 8.6). Workplace ETS exposure was also associated with methacholine challenge-positive asthma reported to be symptomatic at work among male subjects (PR 4. 2; 95% CI 1.8 to 9.8), whereas high asthma-risk occupations were associated with this outcome among female subjects (PR 2.7; 95% CI 1. 05 to 7.1). Respiratory work disability, defined as breathing-related job change due to work loss, was associated with workplace exposures themselves, even after taking into account other covariates. Better control of workplace exposures, including workplace ETS, may reduce work disability caused by respiratory conditions, especially adult asthma.
PubMed ID
10588624 View in PubMed
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Asthma symptoms and nasal congestion as independent risk factors for insomnia in a general population: results from the GA(2)LEN survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118710
Source
Allergy. 2013 Feb;68(2):213-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
F. Sundbom
E. Lindberg
A. Bjerg
B. Forsberg
K. Franklin
M. Gunnbjörnsdottir
R. Middelveld
K. Torén
C. Janson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine & Allergology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 2013 Feb;68(2):213-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Obstruction - diagnosis - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Asthma and rhinitis have been related to insomnia. The aim of this study was to further analyse the association between asthma, nasal symptoms and insomnia and to identify risk factors for sleep disturbance among patients with asthma, in a large population-based set of material.
In 2008, a postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 45 000 adults in four Swedish cities. The questionnaire included questions on insomnia, asthma, rhinitis, weight, height, tobacco use and physical activity.
Twenty-five thousand six hundred and ten subjects participated. Asthma was defined as either current medication for asthma or at least one attack of asthma during the last 12 months, and 1830 subjects (7.15%) were defined as asthmatics. The prevalence of insomnia symptoms was significantly higher among asthmatics than non-asthmatics (47.3% vs 37.2%,
PubMed ID
23176562 View in PubMed
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Breath-taking jobs: a case-control study of respiratory work disability by occupation in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283039
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2016 Sep;73(9):600-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
A K Fell
R. Abrahamsen
P K Henneberger
M V Svendsen
E. Andersson
K. Torén
J. Kongerud
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2016 Sep;73(9):600-6
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Career Choice
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations - classification
Principal Component Analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The current knowledge on respiratory work disability is based on studies that used crude categories of exposure. This may lead to a loss of power, and does not provide sufficient information to allow targeted workplace interventions and follow-up of patients with respiratory symptoms.
The aim of this study was to identify occupations and specific exposures associated with respiratory work disability.
In 2013, a self-administered questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of the general population, aged 16-50, in Telemark County, Norway. We defined respiratory work disability as a positive response to the survey question: 'Have you ever had to change or leave your job because it affected your breathing?' Occupational exposures were assessed using an asthma-specific job-exposure matrix, and comparison of risks was made for cases and a median of 50 controls per case.
247 workers had changed their work because of respiratory symptoms, accounting for 1.7% of the respondents ever employed. The 'breath-taking jobs' were cooks/chefs: adjusted OR 3.6 (95% CI 1.6 to 8.0); welders: 5.2 (2.0 to 14); gardeners: 4.5 (1.3 to 15); sheet metal workers: 5.4 (2.0 to 14); cleaners: 5.0 (2.2 to 11); hairdressers: 6.4 (2.5 to 17); and agricultural labourers: 7.4 (2.5 to 22). Job changes were also associated with a variety of occupational exposures, with some differences between men and women.
Self-report and job-exposure matrix data showed similar findings. For the occupations and exposures associated with job change, preventive measures should be implemented.
Notes
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2014 May;58(4):469-8124504176
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 2000 May;37(5):451-810723039
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Cites: Respir Res. 2009 Oct 12;10:9419821983
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PubMed ID
27365181 View in PubMed
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55 records – page 1 of 6.