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Analysis of midwifery students' written reflections to evaluate progression in learning during clinical practice at birthing units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266484
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2015 Mar;15(2):134-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Eva K Persson
Linda J Kvist
Maria Ekelin
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2015 Mar;15(2):134-40
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Delivery Rooms
Educational Measurement - methods
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Midwifery - education
Pregnancy
Problem-Based Learning
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Writing
Abstract
Written daily reflections during clinical practice on birthing units have been used during several years in midwifery education at Lund University, Sweden. However, the usefulness of these reflections for evaluation of progression in learning and professional development of students has to date not been evaluated. In order to analyse written reflections, two taxonomies developed by Bloom and Pettersen have been applied to the texts. Progression in the professional development of midwifery students can be seen through levels of complexity in cognitive and psycho-motor learning areas and also in the description of learning situations. Progression can be seen from a basic description of facts in simple situations at the beginning of the students' practice to a complex description of complicated situations towards the end of the practice. Written daily reflections appear to be a suitable method to help students to reflect in a structured way, thereby helping their professional development. Reflections can help clinical supervisors to understand the needs of the individual student and to support their knowledge accruement. Daily written reflections on clinical practice can be of use in other health education programs.
PubMed ID
25661056 View in PubMed
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The association between Mycoplasma genitalium and pelvic inflammatory disease after termination of pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98588
Source
BJOG. 2010 Feb;117(3):361-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
C. Bjartling
S. Osser
K. Persson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Malmo University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden. carina.bjartling@skane.se
Source
BJOG. 2010 Feb;117(3):361-4
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - methods
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Chlamydia Infections - complications
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Female
Humans
Mycoplasma Infections - complications
Mycoplasma genitalium - isolation & purification
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease - microbiology
Postoperative Complications - microbiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The prevalence and complications of Mycoplasma genitalium and Chlamydia trachomatis infections among women undergoing termination of pregnancy were studied in this nested case-control study at Malmo University Hospital, Sweden, during 2003 to 2007. The study comprised 2079 women presenting for termination of pregnancy. Forty-nine women with M. genitalium infection and 51 women with C. trachomatis infection, together with 168 negative control women, were evaluated. The prevalences of M. genitalium and C. trachomatis were 2.5% and 2.8%, respectively. The M. genitalium was strongly associated with post-termination pelvic inflammatory disease (odds ratio 6.29, 95% CI 1.56-25.2). The increased risk for pelvic inflammatory disease associated with M. genitalium infection after termination of pregnancy suggests a causal relationship.
PubMed ID
20015303 View in PubMed
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Breast self-examination among Swedish women: a survey of frequency, knowledge, and attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23389
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1995;10(3):163-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
K. Persson
I. Johansson
A C Ek
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences Department of Caring Sciences, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1995;10(3):163-7
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Self-Examination
Comparative Study
Education
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupations
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Partners
Sweden
Abstract
Breast cancer is a common cause of death among women. The aim of this study was to determine whether women carry out regular breast self-examination (BSE), and to describe their knowledge of, and attitudes towards, breast cancer. Questionnaires were mailed to 200 randomly selected women who had not undergone breast cancer surgery. The response rate was 81%. The respondents were divided in three groups: those who practiced BSE regularly, those who practiced BSE occasionally, and those who did not practice BSE. The results show that only 10% of the sample practice BSE. Neither age, educational background, nor occupation, nor having knowledge of breast disease and medical outcome was associated with BSE practice. Nor did having a close relative or friend with breast cancer affect the practice of BSE.
PubMed ID
8534603 View in PubMed
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Breast self-examination: an analysis of self-reported practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22103
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1997 May;25(5):886-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
K. Persson
P G Svensson
A C Ek
Author Affiliation
Department of Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Jönköping, Sweden. Kerstin:Persson@hhj.hj.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1997 May;25(5):886-92
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Breast Self-Examination - psychology
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Religion
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the performance of breast self-examination (BSE) and age, place of residence, ethnic background and religion, as well as whether a group willing to take part in an interview regarding BSE mirrored the whole population. Six hundred and ninety-four (69.4%) women, aged 25-80, responded to the questionnaire. Of these, 69.6% examined their breasts. Whether the subjects lived in urban or rural areas was of no importance for practising BSE, nor was country of birth or number of years in Sweden. A larger proportion of women aged 45-80 practised BSE compared with women aged 25-44 (P
PubMed ID
9147194 View in PubMed
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Characterization of Chlamydia trachomatis omp1 genotypes among sexually transmitted disease patients in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192697
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2001 Nov;39(11):3915-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
M. Jurstrand
L. Falk
H. Fredlund
M. Lindberg
P. Olcén
S. Andersson
K. Persson
J. Albert
A. Bäckman
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Orebro Medical Centre Hospital, SE-70185 Orebro, Sweden. margaretha.jurstrand@orebroll.se
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2001 Nov;39(11):3915-9
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - classification - genetics - metabolism
Female
Female Urogenital Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Male
Male Urogenital Diseases
Middle Aged
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Porins - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Bacterial - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Urine - microbiology
Urogenital System - microbiology
Abstract
A method for detection and genotyping of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections based on omp1 gene amplification and sequencing was developed. DNA was extracted from urogenital or urine samples using a Chelex-based method, and an approximately 1,100-bp-long fragment from the omp1 gene was directly amplified and sequenced. Genotyping was performed by BLAST similarity search, and phylogenetic tree analysis was used to illustrate the evolutionary relationships between clinical isolates and reference strains. The method was used to determine the genotypes of C. trachomatis in 237 positive urogenital and/or urine specimens collected at a Swedish sexually transmitted disease clinic during 1 year. The most common genotypes corresponded to serotypes E (47%) and F (17%). The omp1 gene was highly conserved for genotype E (106 of 112 samples without any mutation) and F (41 of 42 samples without any mutation) strains but appear slightly less conserved for genotypes G (n = 6) and H (n = 6), where the sequences displayed one to four nucleotide substitutions relative to the reference sequence. Genotyping of samples collected at the follow-up visit indicated that two patients had become reinfected, while three other patients suffered treatment failure or reinfection. One woman appeared to have a mixed infection with two different C. trachomatis strains. This omp1 genotyping method had a high reproducibility and could be used for epidemiological characterization of sexually transmitted Chlamydia infections.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11682507 View in PubMed
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[Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR)--a common cause of respiratory tract infections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226204
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jun 5;88(23):2143-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1991

A clinical and epidemiological study of "ornithosis" caused by Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia pneumoniae (strain TWAR).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38301
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1989;21(6):681-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
A. Frydén
E. Kihlström
R. Maller
K. Persson
V. Romanus
S. Anséhn
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1989;21(6):681-91
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Bacterial - immunology
Child
Chlamydia Infections - drug therapy - etiology
Chlamydophila psittaci - isolation & purification
Complement Fixation Tests
Female
Humans
Incidence
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Psittacosis - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Ornithosis is a notifiable disease in Sweden since 1954. In 1981 and 1982 a sharp increase in the number of notifications occurred. Since then the number has declined but is still high. A changed epidemiology characterized by no history of bird contact and no common source, raised the suspicion of a new agent. Serological data now suggest that the epidemic was to a substantial part due to Chlamydia pneumoniae (strain TWAR) (48% of the patients during 1981-1982 compared to 9% during 1984-1987). During recent years TWAR infections have thus become uncommon but reappearance can be expected in the near future. The clinical picture as well as the complications appear to be very similar in infections caused by C. pneumoniae and C. psittaci.
PubMed ID
2617210 View in PubMed
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Combined seropositivity for H. pylori and C. pneumoniae is associated with age, obesity and social factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67460
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 2000 Jun;7(3):191-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
R. Ekesbo
P M Nilsson
L H Lindholm
K. Persson
T. Wadström
Author Affiliation
Primary Health Care Centre, Dalby, Sweden. ekesbo.mevrick@swipnet.se
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 2000 Jun;7(3):191-5
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Chlamydophila Infections - complications
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - immunology
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Education
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Helicobacter Infections - complications
Helicobacter pylori - immunology
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Immunoblotting
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Insulin - blood
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Pilot Projects
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Class
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been associated with chronic infection by Helicobacter pylori and Chlamydia pneumoniae both in cross-sectional and in prospective follow-up cohort studies. This association may be partly due to an increase in metabolic risk factors for CVD, secondary to low-grade inflammation caused by infections. OBJECTIVE: To investigate for subjects classified according to serology titres for infection with C. pneumoniae and H. pylori associations between seropositivity and the degree of obesity and fasting insulin levels, as well as social factors. METHODS: Using methods based on those in earlier investigations of hypertensive patients in the Dalby primary-health-care district, southern Sweden, we investigated frozen samples from serum of 310 middle-aged treated hypertensives and 288 age-matched and sex-matched normotensive controls from a defined population. The baseline examination included the measurement of weight, height and blood pressure as a mean of two office readings with the subject supine. The body mass index (BMI) was calculated as kg/m2. Fasting blood samples were drawn for measurements of levels of serum lipids, blood glucose, plasma insulin and serum lipids, including total cholesterol and triglycerides. The serology titres for H. pylori were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The titres for C. pneumoniae were determined by a micro-immunofluorescence method. Self-reported factors concerning social and lifestyle backgrounds were recorded. RESULTS: The group (n = 245) of subjects with combined positive serology for H. pylori and C. pneumoniae differed from the group without any positive serology (n = 57) in age (61.6 versus 57.4 years, P
PubMed ID
11006888 View in PubMed
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Comparison of health care utilization of postnatal programs in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29939
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2005 Jan-Feb;34(1):55-62
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Ellberg
B. Lundman
M E K Persson
U. Hogberg
Author Affiliation
Kvinnokliniken Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, S-90185 Umea, Sweden. lotta.ellberg@vll.se
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2005 Jan-Feb;34(1):55-62
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Maternal Health Services - utilization
Postnatal Care - organization & administration
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Program Evaluation
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Term Birth
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the utilization of health care services, based on number of outpatient visits and readmissions, by mothers and newborns following discharge postnatally after having received various types of maternity care. DESIGN: The design was a cohort of Swedish women giving birth at full term. All together, 773 women and 782 newborns were followed using questionnaires, registry data, and medical chart notes. The information served as a basis for analyzing utilization of health care services during the first 28 days post-delivery. RESULTS: Of the women, 15% sought medical care and 1.7% were readmitted, whereas 17% of the newborns received medical care and 2.9% were readmitted. At 6 months, about half were exclusively being breastfed. There was no difference in need to seek health care or breastfeeding outcome owing to type of maternity care. CONCLUSION: Mothers with newborns sought care relatively frequently but rarely needed to be readmitted after discharge from the maternity care. The risk of readmission during the first month after childbirth was not greater for mothers and children who received care through the family suite or early discharge programs.
PubMed ID
15673646 View in PubMed
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Decline of herpes simplex virus type 2 and Chlamydia trachomatis infections from 1970 to 1993 indicated by a similar change in antibody pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64634
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1995;27(3):195-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
K. Persson
A. Månsson
E. Jönsson
E. Nordenfelt
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Virology, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1995;27(3):195-9
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - immunology
Chlamydia trachomatis - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Herpes Genitalis - epidemiology - immunology
Herpesvirus 2, Human - immunology
Humans
Incidence
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - immunology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Antibodies to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) were determined in sera from pregnant women from 1970 and at intervals up to 1993. The trends for HSV-2 and Ct infections were deduced from the observed antibody rates in different age groups during the observation period. Total antibody rates for HSV-2 tended to decline toward the end of the period when age-matched groups were compared, while the Ct antibody rates peaked in 1979 and then declined gradually. Age-specific antibody rates showed declining frequencies in women younger than 20 years for both HSV-2 and Ct over the study period. Women 35 years of age and older in the early 1990s had significantly higher antibody rates than younger women at that time or than women of similar age in the early 1970s. This group of slightly older women with high antibody rates in the 1990s were 15-20 years of age in 1970 when a high antibody frequency was noted in this age group. High antibody rates against both HSV-2 and Ct in older pregnant women in the early 1990s may thus reflect a high incidence of these infections around 1970. The declining rates of antibodies in the youngest women would suggest a declining incidence of primary infections in this group.
PubMed ID
8539540 View in PubMed
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54 records – page 1 of 6.