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Consumption of dairy products in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: data from 35 955 24-hour dietary recalls in 10 European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18551
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1259-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
A. Hjartåker
A. Lagiou
N. Slimani
E. Lund
M D Chirlaque
E. Vasilopoulou
X. Zavitsanos
F. Berrino
C. Sacerdote
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
D. Engeset
G. Skeie
A. Aller
P. Amiano
G. Berglund
S. Nilsson
A. McTaggart
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
M. Schulz
B. Hemon
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Section of Medical Statistics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1122, Blindern, N-0317 Norway. anette.hjartaker@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1259-71
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Dairy Products
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe and compare the consumption of dairy products in cohorts included in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: Data from single 24-hour dietary recall interviews collected through a highly standardised computer-based program (EPIC-SOFT) in 27 redefined centres in 10 European countries between 1995 and 2000. From a total random sample of 36 900, 22 924 women and 13 031 men were selected after exclusion of subjects under 35 and over 74 years of age. RESULTS: A high total consumption of dairy products was reported in most of the centres in Spain and in the UK cohort sampled from the general population, as well as in the Dutch, Swedish and Danish centres. A somewhat low consumption was reported in the Greek centre and in some of the Italian centres (Ragusa and Turin). In all centres and for both sexes, milk constituted the dairy sub-group with the largest proportion (in grams) of total dairy consumption, followed by yoghurt and other fermented milk products, and cheese. Still, there was a wide range in the contributions of the different dairy sub-groups between centres. The Spanish and Nordic centres generally reported a high consumption of milk, the Swedish and Dutch centres reported a high consumption of yoghurt and other fermented milk products, whereas the highest consumption of cheese was reported in the French centres. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate both quantitative and qualitative disparities in dairy product consumption among the EPIC centres. This offers a sound starting point for analyses of associations between dairy intake and chronic diseases such as cancer.
PubMed ID
12639231 View in PubMed
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A cross-sectional study of dietary habits and urinary glucose excretion - a predictor of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20439
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 May;54(5):434-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
A. Ekblond
L. Mellemkjaer
A. Tjonneland
M. Suntum
C. Stripp
K. Overvad
C. Johansen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 May;54(5):434-9
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cereals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology - prevention & control - urine
Diet
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Glycosuria
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Milk
Poultry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between consumption of certain foods and macronutrients and urinary glucose excretion, which is a predictor of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study, Denmark, 1993-97. SUBJECTS: Participants in the Danish study 'Diet, Cancer and Health'. After exclusion of persons with postprandial urine samples and persons with diabetes or other diseases potentially resulting in glycosuria, the study population included 14 743 men and 18 064 women aged 50-64 y. We identified 183 men and 43 women with glucose in their urine. RESULTS: Consumption of poultry was negatively associated with glycosuria in both men (odds ratio, OR=0.87; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI=0.77-0.98) and women (OR=0.69; 0.48-1.00). Fiber from fruit showed a weak negative association with glycosuria in both men (0. 95; 0.90-1.01) and women (0.89; 0.78-1.02), whereas a significant negative association with total fiber (0.68; 0.51-0.91) and fiber from vegetables (0.94; 0.88-0.99) was seen in men. Intake of fish tended to reduce the risk of glycosuria in women only (0.80; 0.63-1. 02), whereas ingestion of milk products increased their risk significantly (1.15; 1.06-1.24). CONCLUSION: Although statistical significance and consistency in the two sexes were not achieved for all end-points, the study indicates a protective effect of dietary products like poultry, fruit and cereals against glycosuria and suggests a promoting effect of milk. SPONSORSHIP: The Danish National Board of Health and the Danish Cancer Society.
PubMed ID
10822293 View in PubMed
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Determinants of plasma alkylresorcinol concentration in Danish post-menopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140604
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011 Jan;65(1):94-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
R. Landberg
A. Kamal-Eldin
P. Aman
J. Christensen
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
A. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agriculture Science, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden. rikard.landberg@lmv.slu.se
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011 Jan;65(1):94-101
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Bread
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Fiber - analysis
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Postmenopause
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Resorcinols - blood
Secale cereale - chemistry
Abstract
Alkylresorcinols (AR), a group of phenolic lipids present in the outer parts of wheat and rye grain kernels, have been suggested as biomarkers of whole-grain wheat and rye intake. In this study, we investigated potential determinants of plasma AR concentration in a free-living population.
Non-fasting samples from post-menopausal women enrolled in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study (n = 360) were selected. Diet was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) and the association between food items likely to contain AR and relevant non-dietary factors were studied by analysis of covariance models.
The median AR concentration was 78 nmol/l (interquartile range = 106.9 nmol/l). Intake of rye bread, identified as the main determinant, was associated with 87% higher plasma total AR concentration per 100 g of bread (95% confidence interval = 46-139%). About 8-12% of the total variation (depending on the AR homologue) in plasma AR concentration was explained by the selected dietary variables. At a nutrient level, total dietary fiber and cereal fiber were significantly associated with plasma total AR concentration (P = 0.05), but only ˜2% of the total plasma AR concentration was explained by the dietary fiber or cereal fiber intake.
In the studied population, AR plasma concentration was mainly affected by rye bread intake among investigated determinants.
PubMed ID
20859297 View in PubMed
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Development of a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire to assess food, energy and nutrient intake in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24666
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;20(4):900-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
J. Haraldsdóttir
M. Ewertz
O M Jensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social Medicine, University of Arhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;20(4):900-5
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Foods to be included in a Danish self-administered semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire were identified from food tables developed, together with data collected, for the survey 'Dietary habits in Denmark, 1985'. The questionnaire was to be used in a prospective study on diet, cancer and health, and the aim was to rank individuals with regard to intake of 19 different nutrients considered of prime importance in human carcinogenesis. The questionnaire for the dietary survey included 247 foods and recipes. From stepwise multiple regression analyses with the intake of each of the 19 nutrients as the dependent variable and the intake of the 247 foods and recipes as independent variables, the foods in the models explaining 90% of the between-person variability were considered for the final questionnaire. All relevant analyses were performed for the study group as a whole, for men and women separately, and in each gender for subgroups of energy intake. Taken together, the models explaining 90% of the between-person variability identified a total of 74 foods or recipes, which were important predictors of the intake of one or more of the nutrients considered. A few foods were excluded and a few foods were added to the final questionnaire based on common biological background information, and on information on foods providing important amounts of given nutrients, but which failed to contribute to regression analyses. The 92 foods and recipes, which were included in the final questionnaire provided altogether 81% of the average total supply of the nutrients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1800428 View in PubMed
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Dietary risk factors for renal cell carcinoma in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22695
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1996 Apr;32A(4):673-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
A. Mellemgaard
J K McLaughlin
K. Overvad
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1996 Apr;32A(4):673-82
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary Fats
Dietary Proteins
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals
Sex Factors
Vitamins
Abstract
The role of diet in the aetiology of renal cell carcinoma was investigated in a population-based case-control study in Denmark. Cases were 20-79 years old, with a histologically verified diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. Controls were sampled from the general population and were frequency-matched on age and sex. A total of 351 cases (73% of the eligible) and 340 controls (68% of the eligible) were included in the study. Dietary information was obtained in a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and the information was confirmed in a subsequent interview performed by trained interviewers who also elicited information on other suspected risk factors such as smoking, occupation, medical history, education and reproductive history. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratios, and, both frequency of consumption of various food stuffs and computed nutrients were examined. A positive association was observed between risk of renal cell carcinoma and total energy intake (odds ratio, OR, for highest quartile compared to lowest: 1.7 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.0-3.0) for men, and 3.5 (95% CI 1.6-6.5) for women), fat intake (OR for highest quartile compared to lowest: 1.9 (95% CI 1.1-3.5) for men, and 3.3 (95% CI 1.6-6.9) for women). For women, an effect was also seen for intake of carbohydrates (OR for highest quartile compared to lowest: 3.2 (95% CI 1.5-6.8), while no protective effect was seen for vegetables or fruit. Dairy products may be associated with risk of renal cell cancer (OR for women using thickly spread butter compared to thinly spread: 11.4 (95% CI 2.8-45), OR for women who drank more than one glass of milk with 3.5% fat content compared to never drink milk: 3.7 (95% CI 1.2-11). As expected, total energy intake, intake of fat, protein and carbohydrates were closely correlated making it difficult to identify one of the energy sources as more closely associated with risk of renal cell cancer than the other. Several energy sources have been identified as possible risk factors for renal cell carcinoma. It is possible that a high energy intake as such rather than the individual sources are responsible for the increased risk. Furthermore, dairy fats may be associated with renal cell carcinoma risk. The observed associations appeared stronger in women, and did not explain the association with obesity and low socio-economic status previously found in Denmark.
PubMed ID
8695272 View in PubMed
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[Diet, cancer and health--a population study and establishment of a biological bank in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20597
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Jan 17;162(3):350-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-2000
Author
A M Tjønneland
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Institut for Epidemiologi og Socialmedicin.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Jan 17;162(3):350-4
Date
Jan-17-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Specimen Handling
Tissue Banks
Abstract
In order to test hypotheses on diet and the risk of cancer, a prospective cohort study was established. A total of 57,055 persons living in Copenhagen and Aarhus, between 50 and 65 years of age, visited a study clinic between December 1993 and May 1997. The participants provided questionnaire data on diet and lifestyle. Furthermore, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure and biological material were collected. All participants will be followed by linkage to health registries including the Cancer Registry and by self-administered follow-up questionnaires. The purpose of this publication is to describe the data-base, which will be available for research in the years to come including the results of the first two years of follow-up.
PubMed ID
10680472 View in PubMed
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Diversity of dietary patterns observed in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18549
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1311-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
N. Slimani
M. Fahey
A A Welch
E. Wirfält
C. Stripp
E. Bergström
J. Linseisen
M B Schulze
C. Bamia
Y. Chloptsios
F. Veglia
S. Panico
H B Bueno-de-Mesquita
M C Ocké
M. Brustad
E. Lund
C A González
A. Barcos
G. Berglund
A. Winkvist
A. Mulligan
P. Appleby
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
E. Kesse
P. Ferrari
W A Van Staveren
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert-Thomas, 69372 Lyon Cedex 08, France. Slimani@iarc.fr
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1311-28
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cultural Diversity
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the diversity in dietary patterns existing across centres/regions participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN AND SETTING: Single 24-hour dietary recall measurements were obtained by means of standardised face-to-face interviews using the EPIC-SOFT software. These have been used to present a graphic multi-dimensional comparison of the adjusted mean consumption of 22 food groups. SUBJECTS: In total, 35 955 men and women, aged 35-74 years, participating in the EPIC nested calibration study. RESULTS: Although wide differences were observed across centres, the countries participating in EPIC are characterised by specific dietary patterns. Overall, Italy and Greece have a dietary pattern characterised by plant foods (except potatoes) and a lower consumption of animal and processed foods, compared with the other EPIC countries. France and particularly Spain have more heterogeneous dietary patterns, with a relatively high consumption of both plant foods and animal products. Apart from characteristics specific to vegetarian groups, the UK 'health-conscious' group shares with the UK general population a relatively high consumption of tea, sauces, cakes, soft drinks (women), margarine and butter. In contrast, the diet in the Nordic countries, The Netherlands, Germany and the UK general population is relatively high in potatoes and animal, processed and sweetened/refined foods, with proportions varying across countries/centres. In these countries, consumption of vegetables and fruit is similar to, or below, the overall EPIC means, and is low for legumes and vegetable oils. Overall, dietary patterns were similar for men and women, although there were large gender differences for certain food groups. CONCLUSIONS: There are considerable differences in food group consumption and dietary patterns among the EPIC study populations. This large heterogeneity should be an advantage when investigating the relationship between diet and cancer and formulating new aetiological hypotheses related to dietary patterns and disease.
PubMed ID
12639235 View in PubMed
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Does the association between smoking status and selected healthy foods depend on gender? A population-based study of 54 417 middle-aged Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19306
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
M. Osler
A. Tjønneland
M. Suntum
B L Thomsen
C. Stripp
M. Grønbaek
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):57-63
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats, Unsaturated - analysis
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits - drug effects
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Smoking serves different functions for men and women. Thus, we wanted to investigate the association between smoking behaviour and intakes of selected healthy foods in men and women with special focus on differences and similarities between the two genders. DESIGN: In 1993-1997, a random sample of 80 996 men and 79 729 women aged 50-64 y was invited to participate in the study 'Diet, Cancer and Health'. In all, 27 179 men and 29 876 women attended a health examination and completed a 192-item food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The association between smoking status and low, median and high intakes of selected foods was examined among 25 821 men and 28 596 women. SETTING: The greater Copenhagen and Aarhus area, Denmark. RESULTS: For both men and women, smoking status group was associated with diet, such that increasing level of smoking status ranging from never smokers over ex-smokers to currently heavy smokers was associated with a lower intake of the healthy foods: fresh fruit, cooked vegetables, raw vegetables/salad, and olive oil. For wine, increasing level of smoking status category was associated with a higher fraction of abstainers and heavy drinkers. The difference between the extreme smoking status categories was larger than the difference between men and women within smoking status categories such that never smoking men in general had a higher intake of healthy foods than heavy smoking women. Correction for age, educational level, and body mass index (BMI) did not affect the results. CONCLUSION: In this middle-aged population, intake of healthy foods were associated with smoking behaviour with a dose-response type of relationship. The overall pattern was similar for men and women.
PubMed ID
11840181 View in PubMed
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Effects of an isocaloric healthy Nordic diet on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and inflammation markers in metabolic syndrome -- a randomized study (SYSDIET).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116441
Source
J Intern Med. 2013 Jul;274(1):52-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
M. Uusitupa
K. Hermansen
M J Savolainen
U. Schwab
M. Kolehmainen
L. Brader
L S Mortensen
L. Cloetens
A. Johansson-Persson
G. Onning
M. Landin-Olsson
K-H Herzig
J. Hukkanen
F. Rosqvist
D. Iggman
J. Paananen
K J Pulkki
M. Siloaho
L. Dragsted
T. Barri
K. Overvad
K E Bach Knudsen
M S Hedemann
P. Arner
I. Dahlman
G I A Borge
P. Baardseth
S M Ulven
I. Gunnarsdottir
S. Jónsdóttir
I. Thorsdottir
M. Orešic
K S Poutanen
U. Risérus
B. Akesson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. matti.uusitupa@uef.fi
Source
J Intern Med. 2013 Jul;274(1):52-66
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apolipoproteins A - blood
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Denmark
Diet - methods
Energy intake
Fatty Acids - analysis
Finland
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Iceland
Inflammation - blood
Insulin Resistance
Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein - blood
Lipids - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - metabolism - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Different healthy food patterns may modify cardiometabolic risk. We investigated the effects of an isocaloric healthy Nordic diet on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, blood pressure and inflammatory markers in people with metabolic syndrome.
We conducted a randomized dietary study lasting for 18-24 weeks in individuals with features of metabolic syndrome (mean age 55 years, BMI 31.6 kg m(-2) , 67% women). Altogether 309 individuals were screened, 200 started the intervention after 4-week run-in period, and 96 (proportion of dropouts 7.9%) and 70 individuals (dropouts 27%) completed the study, in the Healthy diet and Control diet groups, respectively. Healthy diet included whole-grain products, berries, fruits and vegetables, rapeseed oil, three fish meals per week and low-fat dairy products. An average Nordic diet served as a Control diet. Compliance was monitored by repeated 4-day food diaries and fatty acid composition of serum phospholipids.
Body weight remained stable, and no significant changes were observed in insulin sensitivity or blood pressure. Significant changes between the groups were found in non-HDL cholesterol (-0.18, mmol L(-1) 95% CI -0.35; -0.01, P = 0.04), LDL to HDL cholesterol (-0.15, -0.28; -0.00, P = 0.046) and apolipoprotein B to apolipoprotein A1 ratios (-0.04, -0.07; -0.00, P = 0.025) favouring the Healthy diet. IL-1 Ra increased during the Control diet (difference -84, -133; -37 ng L(-1) , P = 0.00053). Intakes of saturated fats (E%, beta estimate 4.28, 0.02; 8.53, P = 0.049) and magnesium (mg, -0.23, -0.41; -0.05, P = 0.012) were associated with IL-1 Ra.
Healthy Nordic diet improved lipid profile and had a beneficial effect on low-grade inflammation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23398528 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Dec 21;160(52):7601-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-1998
Author
B L Heitmann
M. Osler
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
H:S Kommunehospitalet, Institut for Sygdomsforebyggelse, Epidemiologisk Grundforsknings center.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Dec 21;160(52):7601-5
Date
Dec-21-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Food Habits
Heart Diseases - etiology
Humans
Life Style
Neoplasms - etiology
Obesity - complications - etiology - prevention & control
Obesity, Morbid - prevention & control
Risk factors
PubMed ID
9889680 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 2 of 5.