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[A quantitative assessment of the impact of diet on the mortality of heart disease in Denmark. Estimation of etiologic fraction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10365
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2000
Author
M. Osler
J. Godtfredsen
M N Grønbaek
P. Marckmann
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Panum Instituttet, afdeling for social medicin og psykosocial sundhed (Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab).
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Date
Sep-11-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to quantify the impact of different dietary factors on the mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. METHODS: Relative risks and knowledge on the distribution of different dietary factors were used to estimate etiological fractions. RESULTS: It is estimated that an intake of fruit and vegetables and saturated fat as recommended would prevent 12 and 22%, respectively, of deaths from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. An intake of fish among those at high risk for ischaemic heart disease, would lead to a 26% lower mortality, while alcohol intake among abstainers would have no significant quantitative effect. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that changes in dietary habits according to current recommendations would have an impact on public health in Denmark.
PubMed ID
11002740 View in PubMed
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Body composition and body fat distribution in relation to later risk of acute myocardial infarction: a Danish follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137399
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1433-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
J G Stegger
E B Schmidt
T. Obel
T L Berentzen
A. Tjønneland
T I A Sørensen
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. Jakob.Stegger@rn.dk
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1433-41
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Composition
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Obesity is a modifiable risk factor for acute myocardial infarction (MI), but lean body mass (LBM) may also be an important factor. Low LBM may increase the risk of MI and LBM may modify the effect of obesity on MI. Thus, the inability of the classical anthropometric measures to evaluate LBM may lead to misclassification of MI risk in both lean and obese persons. We investigated the associations between incident MI and bioelectrical impedance analyses (BIA) derived measures of body composition in combination with body mass index (BMI) and anthropometric measures of body fat distribution.
From 1993 to 1997, 27?148 men and 29?863 women, aged 50 to 64 year, were recruited into the Danish prospective study Diet, Cancer and Health. During 11.9 years of follow-up we identified 2028 cases of incident MI (1487 men and 541 women). BMI, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference and BIA of body composition including body fat mass (BFM), body fat percentage and LBM were measured at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazard models with age as time axis and performed extensive control for confounding. Weight, BMI, classical estimates of abdominal obesity and BIA estimates of obesity showed significant positive associations with incident MI. However, BFM adjusted for WC showed no association. Low LBM was associated with a higher risk of incident MI in both genders, and high LBM was associated with a higher risk in men.
Obesity was positively associated with MI. Estimates of obesity achieved by BIA seemed not to add additional information to classical anthropometric measures regarding MI risk. Both high and low LBM may be positively associated with MI.
PubMed ID
21285940 View in PubMed
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Interaction between blood type, smoking and factor V Leiden mutation and risk of venous thromboembolism: a Danish case-cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124479
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2012 Oct;10(10):2191-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012

Long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and diabetes-associated mortality: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121320
Source
Diabetologia. 2013 Jan;56(1):36-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
M. Sørensen
M. Ketzel
O. Hertel
S. Loft
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
Z J Andersen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Diabetologia. 2013 Jan;56(1):36-46
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - mortality
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide - toxicity
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Residence Characteristics
Time Factors
Urban health
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate whether air pollution from traffic at a residence is associated with mortality related to type 1 or type 2 diabetes.
We followed up 52,061 participants in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort for diabetes-related mortality in the nationwide Register of Causes of Death, from baseline in 1993-1997 up to the end of 2009, and traced their residential addresses since 1971 in the Central Population Registry. We used dispersion-modelled concentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) since 1971 and amount of traffic at the baseline residence as indicators of traffic-related air pollution and used Cox regression models to estimate mortality-rate ratios (MRRs) with adjustment for potential confounders.
Mean levels of NO2 at the residence since 1971 were significantly associated with mortality from diabetes. Exposure above 19.4 µg/m³ (upper quartile) was associated with a MRR of 2.15 (95% CI 1.21, 3.83) when compared with below 13.6 µg/m³ (lower quartile), corresponding to an MRR of 1.31 (95% CI 0.98, 1.76) per 10 µg/m³ NO2 after adjustment for potential confounders.
This study suggests that traffic-related air pollution is associated with mortality from diabetes. If confirmed, reduction in population exposure to traffic-related air pollution could be an additional strategy against the global public health burden of diabetes.
PubMed ID
22918192 View in PubMed
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[The connection between food and alcohol intake habits among 48.763 Danish men and women. A cross-sectional study in the project "Food, cancer and health"]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10537
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Dec 13;161(50):6923-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-1999
Author
A M Tjønneland
M N Grønbaek
C. Stripp
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Institut for Epidemiologisk Kraeftforskning, Kraeftens Bekaempelse, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Dec 13;161(50):6923-7
Date
Dec-13-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - etiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - prevention & control
Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Variation in diet associated with drinking patterns may partly explain why wine seems to reduce ischaemic heart disease mortality. In a cross-sectional study conducted in Copenhagen and Aarhus from 1995 to 1997 including 23,284 men and 25,479 women aged 50-64 years, the relation between intake of different alcoholic beverages and selected indicators of a healthy diet was investigated. In multivariate analyses, wine, as compared with other alcoholic drinks, was associated with a higher intake of fruit, fish, cooked vegetables, salad, the use of olive oil for cooking and not using fat spread on rye bread. In conclusion, the association between wine drinking and an intake of a healthy diet may have implications for the interpretation of previous reports of the relation between type of alcoholic beverage and ischaemic heart disease mortality.
PubMed ID
10643379 View in PubMed
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Type of alcohol and drinking pattern in 56, 970 Danish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10512
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Feb;54(2):174-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
M. Grønbaek
A. Tjønneland
D. Johansen
C. Stripp
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Kommunehospitalet, DK-1399 Copenhagen K, Denmark. mg@ipm.hosp.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Feb;54(2):174-6
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Beer
Coronary Disease - mortality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Wine
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe drinking patterns among individuals who prefer drinking wine, beer or spirits. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study obtaining detailed information on intake of wine, beer and spirits and on frequency of alcohol intake. Adjustment for gender, age, smoking habits, educational attainment and body mass index. SETTING: Denmark. SUBJECTS: 27, 151 men and 29, 819 women, randomly selected from Copenhagen and Aarhus, Denmark. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Drinking pattern-steady or binge drinking. RESULTS: A vast majority (71%) of both men and women preferred wine or beer. At all levels of total alcohol intake, beer drinkers were most likely to be frequent drinkers. Thus, light drinkers of beer had an odds ratio for being frequent drinkers of 1.97 (95% confidence limits 1.50-2.58) as compared to light drinkers of wine (total alcohol intake 3-30 drinks per month), while people who preferred beer had an odds ratio of 1. 29 (1.19-1.40) compared with wine drinkers in the moderate drinking category (31-134 drinks per month). There were no significant differences in total alcohol intake between individuals preferring different alcoholic beverages. CONCLUSION: If binge drinking is less healthy than steady drinking, the relation between wine intake and coronary heart disease mortality could be subject to negative confounding, since beer drinkers seem to have the most sensible drinking pattern. SPONSORSHIP: Danish Cancer Society and the Danish National Board of Health. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2000) 54, 174-176
PubMed ID
10694790 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.