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[A quantitative assessment of the impact of diet on the mortality of heart disease in Denmark. Estimation of etiologic fraction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10365
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2000
Author
M. Osler
J. Godtfredsen
M N Grønbaek
P. Marckmann
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Panum Instituttet, afdeling for social medicin og psykosocial sundhed (Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab).
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Date
Sep-11-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to quantify the impact of different dietary factors on the mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. METHODS: Relative risks and knowledge on the distribution of different dietary factors were used to estimate etiological fractions. RESULTS: It is estimated that an intake of fruit and vegetables and saturated fat as recommended would prevent 12 and 22%, respectively, of deaths from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. An intake of fish among those at high risk for ischaemic heart disease, would lead to a 26% lower mortality, while alcohol intake among abstainers would have no significant quantitative effect. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that changes in dietary habits according to current recommendations would have an impact on public health in Denmark.
PubMed ID
11002740 View in PubMed
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Diversity of dietary patterns observed in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18549
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1311-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
N. Slimani
M. Fahey
A A Welch
E. Wirfält
C. Stripp
E. Bergström
J. Linseisen
M B Schulze
C. Bamia
Y. Chloptsios
F. Veglia
S. Panico
H B Bueno-de-Mesquita
M C Ocké
M. Brustad
E. Lund
C A González
A. Barcos
G. Berglund
A. Winkvist
A. Mulligan
P. Appleby
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
E. Kesse
P. Ferrari
W A Van Staveren
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert-Thomas, 69372 Lyon Cedex 08, France. Slimani@iarc.fr
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1311-28
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cultural Diversity
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the diversity in dietary patterns existing across centres/regions participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN AND SETTING: Single 24-hour dietary recall measurements were obtained by means of standardised face-to-face interviews using the EPIC-SOFT software. These have been used to present a graphic multi-dimensional comparison of the adjusted mean consumption of 22 food groups. SUBJECTS: In total, 35 955 men and women, aged 35-74 years, participating in the EPIC nested calibration study. RESULTS: Although wide differences were observed across centres, the countries participating in EPIC are characterised by specific dietary patterns. Overall, Italy and Greece have a dietary pattern characterised by plant foods (except potatoes) and a lower consumption of animal and processed foods, compared with the other EPIC countries. France and particularly Spain have more heterogeneous dietary patterns, with a relatively high consumption of both plant foods and animal products. Apart from characteristics specific to vegetarian groups, the UK 'health-conscious' group shares with the UK general population a relatively high consumption of tea, sauces, cakes, soft drinks (women), margarine and butter. In contrast, the diet in the Nordic countries, The Netherlands, Germany and the UK general population is relatively high in potatoes and animal, processed and sweetened/refined foods, with proportions varying across countries/centres. In these countries, consumption of vegetables and fruit is similar to, or below, the overall EPIC means, and is low for legumes and vegetable oils. Overall, dietary patterns were similar for men and women, although there were large gender differences for certain food groups. CONCLUSIONS: There are considerable differences in food group consumption and dietary patterns among the EPIC study populations. This large heterogeneity should be an advantage when investigating the relationship between diet and cancer and formulating new aetiological hypotheses related to dietary patterns and disease.
PubMed ID
12639235 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Dec 21;160(52):7601-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-1998
Author
B L Heitmann
M. Osler
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
H:S Kommunehospitalet, Institut for Sygdomsforebyggelse, Epidemiologisk Grundforsknings center.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Dec 21;160(52):7601-5
Date
Dec-21-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Food Habits
Heart Diseases - etiology
Humans
Life Style
Neoplasms - etiology
Obesity - complications - etiology - prevention & control
Obesity, Morbid - prevention & control
Risk factors
PubMed ID
9889680 View in PubMed
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Food sources of carbohydrates in a European cohort of adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18553
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1197-215
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
E. Wirfält
A. McTaggart
V. Pala
B. Gullberg
G. Frasca
S. Panico
H B Bueno-de-Mesquita
P H M Peeters
D. Engeset
G. Skeie
M D Chirlaque
P. Amiano
E. Lundin
A. Mulligan
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
U. Nöthlings
E. Polychronopoulos
K. Georga
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, SE-20502 Sweden. elisabet.wirfalt@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1197-215
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the average consumption of carbohydrate-providing food groups among study centres of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: Of the 27 redefined EPIC study centres, 19 contributed subjects of both genders and eight centres female participants only (men, women, after exclusion of subjects under 35 and over 74 years of age from the original 36 900 total). Dietary data were obtained using the 24-hour recall methodology using the EPIC-SOFT software. The major sources of dietary carbohydrate were identified, and 16 food groups were examined. RESULTS: The 10 food groups contributing most carbohydrate were bread; fruit; milk and milk products; sweet buns, cakes and pies; potato; sugar and jam; pasta and rice; vegetables and legumes; crispbread; and fruit and vegetable juices. Consumption of fruits as well as vegetables and legumes was higher in southern compared with northern centres, while soft drinks consumption was higher in the north. Italian centres had high pasta and rice consumption, but breakfast cereal, potato, and sweet buns, cakes and pies were higher in northern centres. In Sweden, lower bread consumption was balanced with a higher consumption of crispbread, and with sweet buns, cakes and pies. Overall, men consumed higher amounts of vegetables and legumes, bread, soft drinks, potatoes, pasta and rice, breakfast cereal and sugar and jam than women, but fruit consumption appeared more frequent in women. CONCLUSION: The study supports the established idea that carbohydrate-rich foods chosen in northern Europe are different from those in the Mediterranean region. When comparing and interpreting diet-disease relationships across populations, researchers need to consider all types of foods.
PubMed ID
12639227 View in PubMed
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