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[A quantitative assessment of the impact of diet on the mortality of heart disease in Denmark. Estimation of etiologic fraction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10365
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2000
Author
M. Osler
J. Godtfredsen
M N Grønbaek
P. Marckmann
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Panum Instituttet, afdeling for social medicin og psykosocial sundhed (Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab).
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Date
Sep-11-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to quantify the impact of different dietary factors on the mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. METHODS: Relative risks and knowledge on the distribution of different dietary factors were used to estimate etiological fractions. RESULTS: It is estimated that an intake of fruit and vegetables and saturated fat as recommended would prevent 12 and 22%, respectively, of deaths from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. An intake of fish among those at high risk for ischaemic heart disease, would lead to a 26% lower mortality, while alcohol intake among abstainers would have no significant quantitative effect. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that changes in dietary habits according to current recommendations would have an impact on public health in Denmark.
PubMed ID
11002740 View in PubMed
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Does the association between smoking status and selected healthy foods depend on gender? A population-based study of 54 417 middle-aged Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19306
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
M. Osler
A. Tjønneland
M. Suntum
B L Thomsen
C. Stripp
M. Grønbaek
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):57-63
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats, Unsaturated - analysis
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits - drug effects
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Smoking serves different functions for men and women. Thus, we wanted to investigate the association between smoking behaviour and intakes of selected healthy foods in men and women with special focus on differences and similarities between the two genders. DESIGN: In 1993-1997, a random sample of 80 996 men and 79 729 women aged 50-64 y was invited to participate in the study 'Diet, Cancer and Health'. In all, 27 179 men and 29 876 women attended a health examination and completed a 192-item food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The association between smoking status and low, median and high intakes of selected foods was examined among 25 821 men and 28 596 women. SETTING: The greater Copenhagen and Aarhus area, Denmark. RESULTS: For both men and women, smoking status group was associated with diet, such that increasing level of smoking status ranging from never smokers over ex-smokers to currently heavy smokers was associated with a lower intake of the healthy foods: fresh fruit, cooked vegetables, raw vegetables/salad, and olive oil. For wine, increasing level of smoking status category was associated with a higher fraction of abstainers and heavy drinkers. The difference between the extreme smoking status categories was larger than the difference between men and women within smoking status categories such that never smoking men in general had a higher intake of healthy foods than heavy smoking women. Correction for age, educational level, and body mass index (BMI) did not affect the results. CONCLUSION: In this middle-aged population, intake of healthy foods were associated with smoking behaviour with a dose-response type of relationship. The overall pattern was similar for men and women.
PubMed ID
11840181 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Dec 21;160(52):7601-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-1998
Author
B L Heitmann
M. Osler
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
H:S Kommunehospitalet, Institut for Sygdomsforebyggelse, Epidemiologisk Grundforsknings center.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Dec 21;160(52):7601-5
Date
Dec-21-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Food Habits
Heart Diseases - etiology
Humans
Life Style
Neoplasms - etiology
Obesity - complications - etiology - prevention & control
Obesity, Morbid - prevention & control
Risk factors
PubMed ID
9889680 View in PubMed
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