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[Salt--an analysis of the connection between intake and health]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15825
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Nov 4;158(45):6415-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-1996
Author
O B Pedersen
H. Ibsen
O K Overvad
L F Ovesen
P. Skøtt
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Nov 4;158(45):6415-20
Date
Nov-4-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
English Abstract
Food Additives - adverse effects - analysis
Health status
Humans
Risk factors
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
The average salt intake (sodium chloride) in Denmark is about 10 g/person/day, which is approximately 8 times higher than the estimated need. Salt added during industrial processing of foods constitutes more than 50% of the daily salt intake. Observational and experimental epidemiological studies indicate no decisive effects on blood pressure in humans caused by considerable variations in the daily salt intake. However, a small group of patients with hypertension may lower their blood pressure by reducing the daily intake of salt to 5 g. It has not been convincingly documented that high salt intake is an independent risk factor in the pathogenesis of asthma, osteoporosis, toxaemia of pregnancy or apoplectic stroke. On the other hand, several epidemiological studies point to the fact that the intake of salted foods may increase the risk of gastric cancer. It is recommended 1) that the food industry as far as possible limits the addition of salt, 2) that foods are supplied with a declaration of the salt content, and 3) that the research in this field is strengthened to facilitate the identification of persons at increased risk of developing disorders associated with high salt intake.
PubMed ID
8992674 View in PubMed
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