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[Attitude of general practitioners to the importance of gender and diet in disease prevention]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10741
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):40-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-1999
Author
U. Hølund
G. Boysen
P. Charles
E F Eriksen
O K Overvad
B H Petersson
B. Sandström
A R Thomassen
M A Vittrup
Author Affiliation
Mejeriernes Ernaeringscenter, Arhus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):40-3
Date
Jan-4-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Denmark
Dietary Services
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Physicians, Family - psychology
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Primary Prevention
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
Three hundred and seventy-four general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark filled in a questionnaire on attitudes to include information on gender and diet in the strategy for prevention of coronary heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis, and overweight/underweight. Risk factors for disease in general were ranked as follows: smoking, alcohol, stress, diet, physical exercise, heredity and hygiene. The patients' lack of motivation, insufficient time for each patient, and inadequate knowledge about nutrition were stated as barriers to dietary counselling. The GPs stated that the gender of the patient was important only to the counselling on osteoporosis. Lack of time and insufficient knowledge were perceived as barriers for including gender specific issues in prevention. It is concluded that GPs consider dietary counselling important but lack time and knowledge. The results point at a need for better pre- and postgraduate training in nutrition, and for a better reimbursement system for time spent on prevention.
PubMed ID
9922687 View in PubMed
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Importance of diet and sex in prevention of coronary artery disease, cancer, osteoporosis, and overweight or underweight: a study of attitudes and practices of Danish primary care physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11048
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Jun;65(6 Suppl):2004S-2006S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
U. Hølund
A. Thomassen
G. Boysen
P. Charles
E F Eriksen
K. Overvad
B. Petersson
B. Sandström
M. Vittrup
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Department, Danish Dairy Board, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Jun;65(6 Suppl):2004S-2006S
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Denmark
Diet
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Obesity - prevention & control
Osteoporosis - prevention & control
Physician's Practice Patterns
Primary Health Care
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
General practitioners (GPs) in Denmark (n = 374) answered a questionnaire on attitudes toward including information on diet and sex in the prevention of coronary artery disease, cancers, osteoporosis, and weight problems. Risk factors for disease were ranked as follows: smoking, alcohol, stress, diet, physical exercise, heredity, and hygiene. Patients' lack of motivation, insufficient time for each patient, and inadequate knowledge about nutrition were listed by GPs as barriers to dietary counseling. GPs stated that the sex of the patient was important only for counseling on osteoporosis. Lack of time and insufficient knowledge were perceived as barriers to including sex-specific issues in prevention. One-half of the GPs were questioned about the issue of prevention on the basis of female case stories and the other half on the basis of male case stories with identical wording. Responses to the case stories indicated that GPs would give dietary guidance and recommend loss of weight to slightly overweight male patients to a much greater degree than to overweight female patients for prevention of coronary artery disease, give dietary counseling and recommend loss of weight and exercise to female patients more than to male patients for prevention of cancers, recommend a supplement of calcium and vitamin D for prevention of osteoporosis to female patients, and recommend weight gain and discuss psychosocial issues more with underweight female patients than with underweight male patients. Female GPs included measures of prevention such as dietary counseling, exercise prescription, dietary supplement prescription, and discussion of psychosocial issues to a greater extent than did male GPs.
PubMed ID
9174510 View in PubMed
Less detail

Is the effect of alcohol on risk of stroke confined to highly stressed persons?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9192
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2005;25(3):105-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
N R Nielsen
T. Truelsen
J C Barefoot
S P Johnsen
K. Overvad
G. Boysen
P. Schnohr
M. Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Centre for Alcohol Research, National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. nrn@niph.dk
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2005;25(3):105-13
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Cerebrovascular Accident - etiology
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Psychological stress and alcohol are both suggested as risk factors for stroke. Further, there appears to be a close relation between stress and alcohol consumption. Several experimental studies have found alcohol consumption to reduce the immediate effects of stress in a laboratory setting. We aimed to examine whether the association between alcohol and stroke depends on level of self-reported stress in a large prospective cohort. METHODS: The 5,373 men and 6,723 women participating in the second examination of the Copenhagen City Heart Study in 1981-1983 were asked at baseline about their self-reported level of stress and their weekly alcohol consumption. The participants were followed-up until 31st of December 1997 during which 880 first ever stroke events occurred. Data were analysed by means of Cox regression modelling. RESULTS: At a high stress level, weekly total consumption of 1-14 units of alcohol compared with no consumption seemed associated with a lower risk of stroke (adjusted RR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.31-1.07). At lower stress levels, no clear associations were observed. Regarding subtypes, self-reported stress appeared only to modify the association between alcohol intake and ischaemic stroke events. Regarding specific types of alcoholic beverages, self-reported stress only modified the associations for intake of beer and wine. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that the apparent lower risk of stroke associated with moderate alcohol consumption is confined to a group of highly stressed persons. It is suggested that alcohol consumption may play a role in reducing the risk of stroke by modifying the physiological or psychological stress response.
PubMed ID
15956807 View in PubMed
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[Prevention in general practice. Are female and male patients treated the same way? A questionnaire study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21278
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):44-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-1999
Author
U. Hølund
G. Boysen
P. Charles
E F Eriksen
O K Overvad
B H Petersson
B. Sandström
A R Thomassen
M A Vittrup
Author Affiliation
Mejeriernes Ernaeringscenter, Arhus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):44-8
Date
Jan-4-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Dietary Services
English Abstract
Family Practice
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Preventive Health Services
Primary Prevention
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
Three hundred and seventy-four general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark filled in a questionnaire on practices regarding prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD), cancer, osteoporosis, and overweight/underweight. Half of the GPs were questioned about the issue of prevention based upon female case stories and the other half on male case stories with identical wording. The GPs more often in relation to: Prevention of CHD gave dietary counselling and recommended weight loss to slightly overweight male than female patients. Prevention of cancers gave dietary counselling and recommended weight loss and increase of exercise to female than to male patients. Prevention of osteoporosis recommended a supplement of calcium and vitamin D to female than to male patients. Treatment of underweight recommended weight gain and discussion of psycho-social issues to underweight female than male patients. In conclusion, GPs distinguish between men and women in relation to prevention strategies in general practice. There is a need for well-described prevention and action strategies with relevant gender differentiation for use in general practice.
PubMed ID
9922688 View in PubMed
Less detail