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9 records – page 1 of 1.

[A quantitative assessment of the impact of diet on the mortality of heart disease in Denmark. Estimation of etiologic fraction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10365
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2000
Author
M. Osler
J. Godtfredsen
M N Grønbaek
P. Marckmann
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Panum Instituttet, afdeling for social medicin og psykosocial sundhed (Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab).
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Date
Sep-11-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to quantify the impact of different dietary factors on the mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. METHODS: Relative risks and knowledge on the distribution of different dietary factors were used to estimate etiological fractions. RESULTS: It is estimated that an intake of fruit and vegetables and saturated fat as recommended would prevent 12 and 22%, respectively, of deaths from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. An intake of fish among those at high risk for ischaemic heart disease, would lead to a 26% lower mortality, while alcohol intake among abstainers would have no significant quantitative effect. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that changes in dietary habits according to current recommendations would have an impact on public health in Denmark.
PubMed ID
11002740 View in PubMed
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[Attitude of general practitioners to the importance of gender and diet in disease prevention]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10741
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):40-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-1999
Author
U. Hølund
G. Boysen
P. Charles
E F Eriksen
O K Overvad
B H Petersson
B. Sandström
A R Thomassen
M A Vittrup
Author Affiliation
Mejeriernes Ernaeringscenter, Arhus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):40-3
Date
Jan-4-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Denmark
Dietary Services
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Physicians, Family - psychology
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Primary Prevention
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
Three hundred and seventy-four general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark filled in a questionnaire on attitudes to include information on gender and diet in the strategy for prevention of coronary heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis, and overweight/underweight. Risk factors for disease in general were ranked as follows: smoking, alcohol, stress, diet, physical exercise, heredity and hygiene. The patients' lack of motivation, insufficient time for each patient, and inadequate knowledge about nutrition were stated as barriers to dietary counselling. The GPs stated that the gender of the patient was important only to the counselling on osteoporosis. Lack of time and insufficient knowledge were perceived as barriers for including gender specific issues in prevention. It is concluded that GPs consider dietary counselling important but lack time and knowledge. The results point at a need for better pre- and postgraduate training in nutrition, and for a better reimbursement system for time spent on prevention.
PubMed ID
9922687 View in PubMed
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[Diet, cancer and health--a population study and establishment of a biological bank in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20597
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Jan 17;162(3):350-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-2000
Author
A M Tjønneland
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Institut for Epidemiologi og Socialmedicin.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Jan 17;162(3):350-4
Date
Jan-17-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Specimen Handling
Tissue Banks
Abstract
In order to test hypotheses on diet and the risk of cancer, a prospective cohort study was established. A total of 57,055 persons living in Copenhagen and Aarhus, between 50 and 65 years of age, visited a study clinic between December 1993 and May 1997. The participants provided questionnaire data on diet and lifestyle. Furthermore, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure and biological material were collected. All participants will be followed by linkage to health registries including the Cancer Registry and by self-administered follow-up questionnaires. The purpose of this publication is to describe the data-base, which will be available for research in the years to come including the results of the first two years of follow-up.
PubMed ID
10680472 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Dec 21;160(52):7601-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-1998
Author
B L Heitmann
M. Osler
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
H:S Kommunehospitalet, Institut for Sygdomsforebyggelse, Epidemiologisk Grundforsknings center.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Dec 21;160(52):7601-5
Date
Dec-21-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Food Habits
Heart Diseases - etiology
Humans
Life Style
Neoplasms - etiology
Obesity - complications - etiology - prevention & control
Obesity, Morbid - prevention & control
Risk factors
PubMed ID
9889680 View in PubMed
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[Prevention in general practice. Are female and male patients treated the same way? A questionnaire study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21278
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):44-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-1999
Author
U. Hølund
G. Boysen
P. Charles
E F Eriksen
O K Overvad
B H Petersson
B. Sandström
A R Thomassen
M A Vittrup
Author Affiliation
Mejeriernes Ernaeringscenter, Arhus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):44-8
Date
Jan-4-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Dietary Services
English Abstract
Family Practice
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Preventive Health Services
Primary Prevention
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
Three hundred and seventy-four general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark filled in a questionnaire on practices regarding prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD), cancer, osteoporosis, and overweight/underweight. Half of the GPs were questioned about the issue of prevention based upon female case stories and the other half on male case stories with identical wording. The GPs more often in relation to: Prevention of CHD gave dietary counselling and recommended weight loss to slightly overweight male than female patients. Prevention of cancers gave dietary counselling and recommended weight loss and increase of exercise to female than to male patients. Prevention of osteoporosis recommended a supplement of calcium and vitamin D to female than to male patients. Treatment of underweight recommended weight gain and discussion of psycho-social issues to underweight female than male patients. In conclusion, GPs distinguish between men and women in relation to prevention strategies in general practice. There is a need for well-described prevention and action strategies with relevant gender differentiation for use in general practice.
PubMed ID
9922688 View in PubMed
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[Salt--an analysis of the connection between intake and health]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15825
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Nov 4;158(45):6415-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-1996
Author
O B Pedersen
H. Ibsen
O K Overvad
L F Ovesen
P. Skøtt
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Nov 4;158(45):6415-20
Date
Nov-4-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
English Abstract
Food Additives - adverse effects - analysis
Health status
Humans
Risk factors
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
The average salt intake (sodium chloride) in Denmark is about 10 g/person/day, which is approximately 8 times higher than the estimated need. Salt added during industrial processing of foods constitutes more than 50% of the daily salt intake. Observational and experimental epidemiological studies indicate no decisive effects on blood pressure in humans caused by considerable variations in the daily salt intake. However, a small group of patients with hypertension may lower their blood pressure by reducing the daily intake of salt to 5 g. It has not been convincingly documented that high salt intake is an independent risk factor in the pathogenesis of asthma, osteoporosis, toxaemia of pregnancy or apoplectic stroke. On the other hand, several epidemiological studies point to the fact that the intake of salted foods may increase the risk of gastric cancer. It is recommended 1) that the food industry as far as possible limits the addition of salt, 2) that foods are supplied with a declaration of the salt content, and 3) that the research in this field is strengthened to facilitate the identification of persons at increased risk of developing disorders associated with high salt intake.
PubMed ID
8992674 View in PubMed
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[The connection between food and alcohol intake habits among 48.763 Danish men and women. A cross-sectional study in the project "Food, cancer and health"]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10537
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Dec 13;161(50):6923-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-1999
Author
A M Tjønneland
M N Grønbaek
C. Stripp
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Institut for Epidemiologisk Kraeftforskning, Kraeftens Bekaempelse, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Dec 13;161(50):6923-7
Date
Dec-13-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - etiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - prevention & control
Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Variation in diet associated with drinking patterns may partly explain why wine seems to reduce ischaemic heart disease mortality. In a cross-sectional study conducted in Copenhagen and Aarhus from 1995 to 1997 including 23,284 men and 25,479 women aged 50-64 years, the relation between intake of different alcoholic beverages and selected indicators of a healthy diet was investigated. In multivariate analyses, wine, as compared with other alcoholic drinks, was associated with a higher intake of fruit, fish, cooked vegetables, salad, the use of olive oil for cooking and not using fat spread on rye bread. In conclusion, the association between wine drinking and an intake of a healthy diet may have implications for the interpretation of previous reports of the relation between type of alcoholic beverage and ischaemic heart disease mortality.
PubMed ID
10643379 View in PubMed
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[The effect of transdermal nicotine patches in smoking cessation. A randomized trial in pharmacy customers in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67548
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Feb 1;161(5):593-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1999
Author
J. Sønderskov
J. Olsen
L. Meillier
O K Overvad
S. Sabroe
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Institut for Epidemiologi og Socialmedicin.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Feb 1;161(5):593-7
Date
Feb-1-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Cutaneous
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Drugs, Non-Prescription
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nicotine - administration & dosage
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the effect of 24-hour nicotine patches in smoking cessation among over-the-counter customers in Denmark based on a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Participants were consecutive customers to whom nicotine patches were offered free of charge and as the only treatment. Forty-two pharmacies in the areas of Aarhus and Copenhagen in Denmark participated in the trial, and 522 customers who smoked 10 or more cigarettes per day were randomized to either nicotine or placebo patches from January to March 1994. Twenty-four-hour patches were offered for a three-month period. Those smoking 20 or more cigarettes per day started on 21 mg/day patches. Customers who smoked less started on 14 mg/day patches and all the participants were gradually reduced to 7 mg/day patches during the study period. Smoking behaviour and compliance were recorded by means of self-administered question-naires and telephone interviews. Smoking status was recorded following each four-week treatment period, and 26 weeks after inclusion. There was a significant increase in smoking cessations rates, but only among smokers who started on 21 mg/day patches after eight weeks of follow-up. No significant differences in smoking cessation rates were seen among smokers who started with the low dose nicotine or placebo patches.
PubMed ID
9989194 View in PubMed
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[The role of diet for development of renal cell carcinoma]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21650
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Apr 27;160(18):2689-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-1998
Author
A. Mellemgaard
J K McLaughlin
O K Overvad
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Sektor for Kraeftepidemiologi, Kraeftens Bekaempelse, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Apr 27;160(18):2689-93
Date
Apr-27-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Abstract
Dietary risk factors for renal cell cancer were investigated in a population based case-control study of incident cases. A total of 351 cases and 340 controls matched for age and sex were interviewed about dietary habits as well as exposure to other known or suspected risk factors. An association was found between risk of renal cell cancer and energy intake, especially fats. There was no protective effect of fruits but a weak protective effect of cruceferous vegetables. The association with diet was present after adjusting for the effect of cigarette smoking, socioeconomic status and body mass index, all of which have been identified as risk factors for renal cell cancer.
PubMed ID
9599551 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.