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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Source
Epidemiol Rev. 2007;29:77-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
M U Jakobsen
T. Berentzen
T I A Sørensen
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Centre for Health And Society, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. muj@dce.au.dk
Source
Epidemiol Rev. 2007;29:77-87
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - metabolism
Denmark
Fatty Liver - metabolism
Humans
Obesity - metabolism
Abstract
It has been hypothesized that visceral fat releases free fatty acids and adipokines and thereby exposes the liver to fat accumulation. The authors aimed to evaluate current epidemiologic evidence for an association between abdominal fat and liver fat content. Clinical and epidemiologic studies with data on abdominal fat and liver fat content were reviewed. Studies using waist circumference to estimate abdominal fat mass suggested a direct association between abdominal fat and liver fat content. Studies using imaging methods suggested a direct association between intraabdominal fat and liver fat content, but not between subcutaneous abdominal fat and liver fat content. In conclusion, clinical and epidemiologic studies of abdominal fat and liver fat content suggest a direct association between abdominal fat and liver fat content which is probably accounted for by visceral fat. However, results from the included studies do not allow strong conclusions regarding the temporal sequence of events. Future longitudinal studies are recommended to obtain additional information on associations and mechanisms. Both abdominal fat depots and other body compartments of interest should be included to further investigate the association between specific fat depots and liver fat content. Biomarkers may provide insight into underlying mechanisms.
PubMed ID
17478441 View in PubMed
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[A quantitative assessment of the impact of diet on the mortality of heart disease in Denmark. Estimation of etiologic fraction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10365
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2000
Author
M. Osler
J. Godtfredsen
M N Grønbaek
P. Marckmann
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Panum Instituttet, afdeling for social medicin og psykosocial sundhed (Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab).
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Date
Sep-11-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to quantify the impact of different dietary factors on the mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. METHODS: Relative risks and knowledge on the distribution of different dietary factors were used to estimate etiological fractions. RESULTS: It is estimated that an intake of fruit and vegetables and saturated fat as recommended would prevent 12 and 22%, respectively, of deaths from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. An intake of fish among those at high risk for ischaemic heart disease, would lead to a 26% lower mortality, while alcohol intake among abstainers would have no significant quantitative effect. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that changes in dietary habits according to current recommendations would have an impact on public health in Denmark.
PubMed ID
11002740 View in PubMed
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Consumption of added fats and oils in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) centres across 10 European countries as assessed by 24-hour dietary recalls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18552
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1227-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
J. Linseisen
E. Bergström
L. Gafá
C A González
A. Thiébaut
A. Trichopoulou
R. Tumino
C. Navarro Sánchez
C. Martínez Garcia
I. Mattisson
S. Nilsson
A. Welch
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
E. Kesse
A B Miller
M. Schulz
K. Botsi
A. Naska
S. Sieri
C. Sacerdote
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
G. Skeie
D. Engeset
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Unit of Human Nutrition and Cancer Prevention, Technical University of Munich, Alte Akademie 16, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany. j.linseisen@wzw.tum.de
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1227-42
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Educational Status
Energy intake
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the consumption of added fats and oils across the European centres and countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN AND SETTING: 24-Hour dietary recalls were collected by means of standardised computer-guided interviews in 27 redefined EPIC centres across 10 European countries. SUBJECTS: From an initial number of 36 900 subjects, single dietary recalls from 22 924 women and 13 031 men in the age range of 35-74 years were included. RESULTS: Mean daily intake of added fats and oils varied between 16.2 g (Varese, Italy) and 41.1 g (Malmö, Sweden) in women and between 24.7 g (Ragusa, Italy) and 66.0 g (Potsdam, Germany) in men. Total mean lipid intake by consumption of added fats and oils, including those used for sauce preparation, ranged between 18.3 (Norway) and 37.2 g day-1 (Greece) in women and 28.4 (Heidelberg, Germany) and 51.2 g day-1 (Greece) in men. The Mediterranean EPIC centres with high olive oil consumption combined with low animal fat intake contrasted with the central and northern European centres where fewer vegetable oils, more animal fats and a high proportion of margarine were consumed. The consumption of added fats and oils of animal origin was highest in the German EPIC centres, followed by the French. The contribution of added fats and oils to total energy intake ranged from 8% in Norway to 22% in Greece. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate a high variation in dietary intake of added fats and oils in EPIC, providing a good opportunity to elucidate the role of dietary fats in cancer aetiology.
PubMed ID
12639229 View in PubMed
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Consumption of dairy products in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: data from 35 955 24-hour dietary recalls in 10 European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18551
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1259-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
A. Hjartåker
A. Lagiou
N. Slimani
E. Lund
M D Chirlaque
E. Vasilopoulou
X. Zavitsanos
F. Berrino
C. Sacerdote
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
D. Engeset
G. Skeie
A. Aller
P. Amiano
G. Berglund
S. Nilsson
A. McTaggart
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
M. Schulz
B. Hemon
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Section of Medical Statistics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1122, Blindern, N-0317 Norway. anette.hjartaker@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1259-71
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Dairy Products
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe and compare the consumption of dairy products in cohorts included in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: Data from single 24-hour dietary recall interviews collected through a highly standardised computer-based program (EPIC-SOFT) in 27 redefined centres in 10 European countries between 1995 and 2000. From a total random sample of 36 900, 22 924 women and 13 031 men were selected after exclusion of subjects under 35 and over 74 years of age. RESULTS: A high total consumption of dairy products was reported in most of the centres in Spain and in the UK cohort sampled from the general population, as well as in the Dutch, Swedish and Danish centres. A somewhat low consumption was reported in the Greek centre and in some of the Italian centres (Ragusa and Turin). In all centres and for both sexes, milk constituted the dairy sub-group with the largest proportion (in grams) of total dairy consumption, followed by yoghurt and other fermented milk products, and cheese. Still, there was a wide range in the contributions of the different dairy sub-groups between centres. The Spanish and Nordic centres generally reported a high consumption of milk, the Swedish and Dutch centres reported a high consumption of yoghurt and other fermented milk products, whereas the highest consumption of cheese was reported in the French centres. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate both quantitative and qualitative disparities in dairy product consumption among the EPIC centres. This offers a sound starting point for analyses of associations between dairy intake and chronic diseases such as cancer.
PubMed ID
12639231 View in PubMed
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A cross-sectional study of dietary habits and urinary glucose excretion - a predictor of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20439
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 May;54(5):434-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
A. Ekblond
L. Mellemkjaer
A. Tjonneland
M. Suntum
C. Stripp
K. Overvad
C. Johansen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 May;54(5):434-9
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cereals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology - prevention & control - urine
Diet
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Glycosuria
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Milk
Poultry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between consumption of certain foods and macronutrients and urinary glucose excretion, which is a predictor of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study, Denmark, 1993-97. SUBJECTS: Participants in the Danish study 'Diet, Cancer and Health'. After exclusion of persons with postprandial urine samples and persons with diabetes or other diseases potentially resulting in glycosuria, the study population included 14 743 men and 18 064 women aged 50-64 y. We identified 183 men and 43 women with glucose in their urine. RESULTS: Consumption of poultry was negatively associated with glycosuria in both men (odds ratio, OR=0.87; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI=0.77-0.98) and women (OR=0.69; 0.48-1.00). Fiber from fruit showed a weak negative association with glycosuria in both men (0. 95; 0.90-1.01) and women (0.89; 0.78-1.02), whereas a significant negative association with total fiber (0.68; 0.51-0.91) and fiber from vegetables (0.94; 0.88-0.99) was seen in men. Intake of fish tended to reduce the risk of glycosuria in women only (0.80; 0.63-1. 02), whereas ingestion of milk products increased their risk significantly (1.15; 1.06-1.24). CONCLUSION: Although statistical significance and consistency in the two sexes were not achieved for all end-points, the study indicates a protective effect of dietary products like poultry, fruit and cereals against glycosuria and suggests a promoting effect of milk. SPONSORSHIP: The Danish National Board of Health and the Danish Cancer Society.
PubMed ID
10822293 View in PubMed
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[Diet, cancer and health--a population study and establishment of a biological bank in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20597
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Jan 17;162(3):350-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-2000
Author
A M Tjønneland
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Institut for Epidemiologi og Socialmedicin.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Jan 17;162(3):350-4
Date
Jan-17-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Specimen Handling
Tissue Banks
Abstract
In order to test hypotheses on diet and the risk of cancer, a prospective cohort study was established. A total of 57,055 persons living in Copenhagen and Aarhus, between 50 and 65 years of age, visited a study clinic between December 1993 and May 1997. The participants provided questionnaire data on diet and lifestyle. Furthermore, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure and biological material were collected. All participants will be followed by linkage to health registries including the Cancer Registry and by self-administered follow-up questionnaires. The purpose of this publication is to describe the data-base, which will be available for research in the years to come including the results of the first two years of follow-up.
PubMed ID
10680472 View in PubMed
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Diversity of dietary patterns observed in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18549
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1311-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
N. Slimani
M. Fahey
A A Welch
E. Wirfält
C. Stripp
E. Bergström
J. Linseisen
M B Schulze
C. Bamia
Y. Chloptsios
F. Veglia
S. Panico
H B Bueno-de-Mesquita
M C Ocké
M. Brustad
E. Lund
C A González
A. Barcos
G. Berglund
A. Winkvist
A. Mulligan
P. Appleby
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
E. Kesse
P. Ferrari
W A Van Staveren
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert-Thomas, 69372 Lyon Cedex 08, France. Slimani@iarc.fr
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1311-28
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cultural Diversity
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the diversity in dietary patterns existing across centres/regions participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN AND SETTING: Single 24-hour dietary recall measurements were obtained by means of standardised face-to-face interviews using the EPIC-SOFT software. These have been used to present a graphic multi-dimensional comparison of the adjusted mean consumption of 22 food groups. SUBJECTS: In total, 35 955 men and women, aged 35-74 years, participating in the EPIC nested calibration study. RESULTS: Although wide differences were observed across centres, the countries participating in EPIC are characterised by specific dietary patterns. Overall, Italy and Greece have a dietary pattern characterised by plant foods (except potatoes) and a lower consumption of animal and processed foods, compared with the other EPIC countries. France and particularly Spain have more heterogeneous dietary patterns, with a relatively high consumption of both plant foods and animal products. Apart from characteristics specific to vegetarian groups, the UK 'health-conscious' group shares with the UK general population a relatively high consumption of tea, sauces, cakes, soft drinks (women), margarine and butter. In contrast, the diet in the Nordic countries, The Netherlands, Germany and the UK general population is relatively high in potatoes and animal, processed and sweetened/refined foods, with proportions varying across countries/centres. In these countries, consumption of vegetables and fruit is similar to, or below, the overall EPIC means, and is low for legumes and vegetable oils. Overall, dietary patterns were similar for men and women, although there were large gender differences for certain food groups. CONCLUSIONS: There are considerable differences in food group consumption and dietary patterns among the EPIC study populations. This large heterogeneity should be an advantage when investigating the relationship between diet and cancer and formulating new aetiological hypotheses related to dietary patterns and disease.
PubMed ID
12639235 View in PubMed
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Does the association between smoking status and selected healthy foods depend on gender? A population-based study of 54 417 middle-aged Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19306
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
M. Osler
A. Tjønneland
M. Suntum
B L Thomsen
C. Stripp
M. Grønbaek
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):57-63
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats, Unsaturated - analysis
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits - drug effects
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Smoking serves different functions for men and women. Thus, we wanted to investigate the association between smoking behaviour and intakes of selected healthy foods in men and women with special focus on differences and similarities between the two genders. DESIGN: In 1993-1997, a random sample of 80 996 men and 79 729 women aged 50-64 y was invited to participate in the study 'Diet, Cancer and Health'. In all, 27 179 men and 29 876 women attended a health examination and completed a 192-item food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The association between smoking status and low, median and high intakes of selected foods was examined among 25 821 men and 28 596 women. SETTING: The greater Copenhagen and Aarhus area, Denmark. RESULTS: For both men and women, smoking status group was associated with diet, such that increasing level of smoking status ranging from never smokers over ex-smokers to currently heavy smokers was associated with a lower intake of the healthy foods: fresh fruit, cooked vegetables, raw vegetables/salad, and olive oil. For wine, increasing level of smoking status category was associated with a higher fraction of abstainers and heavy drinkers. The difference between the extreme smoking status categories was larger than the difference between men and women within smoking status categories such that never smoking men in general had a higher intake of healthy foods than heavy smoking women. Correction for age, educational level, and body mass index (BMI) did not affect the results. CONCLUSION: In this middle-aged population, intake of healthy foods were associated with smoking behaviour with a dose-response type of relationship. The overall pattern was similar for men and women.
PubMed ID
11840181 View in PubMed
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Folate intake, alcohol and risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9096
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;60(2):280-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
A. Tjønneland
J. Christensen
A. Olsen
C. Stripp
S B Nissen
K. Overvad
B L Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, The Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. annet@cancer.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;60(2):280-6
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: There is consistent evidence that alcohol increases the risk of breast cancer. It has been suggested that the increased risk associated with alcohol intake may be reduced by adequate intake of folate. Since many women consume alcohol, detection of a risk-reducing mechanism would have major public health implications. DESIGN: We therefore evaluated the possible interaction between alcohol and folate in a paired nested case-control study among postmenopausal women. SETTING: A total of 24 697 postmenopausal women were included in the 'Diet, Cancer and Health' follow-up study between December 1993 and May 1997. The cohort was followed until December 2000. The study included 388 cases of breast cancer and 388 randomly selected controls were used to estimate the breast cancer incidence rate ratio (IRR) in conditional logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: A previously established association between alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer was present mainly among women with low folate intake. An IRR of 1.19 (95% CI: 0.99-1.42) per 10 g average daily alcohol intake was found for women with a daily folate intake below 300 mug, while among women with a folate intake higher than 350 mug, we could not show an association between the alcohol intake and the breast cancer incidence rate (e.g. folate intake >400 mug; IRR of 1.01 (95% CI: 0.85-1.20)). CONCLUSION: The findings support the evidence that adequate folate intake may attenuate the risk of breast cancer associated with high alcohol intake. SPONSORSHIP: The Danish Cancer Society.
PubMed ID
16234832 View in PubMed
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Food sources of carbohydrates in a European cohort of adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18553
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1197-215
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
E. Wirfält
A. McTaggart
V. Pala
B. Gullberg
G. Frasca
S. Panico
H B Bueno-de-Mesquita
P H M Peeters
D. Engeset
G. Skeie
M D Chirlaque
P. Amiano
E. Lundin
A. Mulligan
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
U. Nöthlings
E. Polychronopoulos
K. Georga
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, SE-20502 Sweden. elisabet.wirfalt@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1197-215
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the average consumption of carbohydrate-providing food groups among study centres of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: Of the 27 redefined EPIC study centres, 19 contributed subjects of both genders and eight centres female participants only (men, women, after exclusion of subjects under 35 and over 74 years of age from the original 36 900 total). Dietary data were obtained using the 24-hour recall methodology using the EPIC-SOFT software. The major sources of dietary carbohydrate were identified, and 16 food groups were examined. RESULTS: The 10 food groups contributing most carbohydrate were bread; fruit; milk and milk products; sweet buns, cakes and pies; potato; sugar and jam; pasta and rice; vegetables and legumes; crispbread; and fruit and vegetable juices. Consumption of fruits as well as vegetables and legumes was higher in southern compared with northern centres, while soft drinks consumption was higher in the north. Italian centres had high pasta and rice consumption, but breakfast cereal, potato, and sweet buns, cakes and pies were higher in northern centres. In Sweden, lower bread consumption was balanced with a higher consumption of crispbread, and with sweet buns, cakes and pies. Overall, men consumed higher amounts of vegetables and legumes, bread, soft drinks, potatoes, pasta and rice, breakfast cereal and sugar and jam than women, but fruit consumption appeared more frequent in women. CONCLUSION: The study supports the established idea that carbohydrate-rich foods chosen in northern Europe are different from those in the Mediterranean region. When comparing and interpreting diet-disease relationships across populations, researchers need to consider all types of foods.
PubMed ID
12639227 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.