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49 records – page 1 of 5.

[Prevention in general practice. Are female and male patients treated the same way? A questionnaire study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21278
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):44-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-1999
Author
U. Hølund
G. Boysen
P. Charles
E F Eriksen
O K Overvad
B H Petersson
B. Sandström
A R Thomassen
M A Vittrup
Author Affiliation
Mejeriernes Ernaeringscenter, Arhus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):44-8
Date
Jan-4-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Dietary Services
English Abstract
Family Practice
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Preventive Health Services
Primary Prevention
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
Three hundred and seventy-four general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark filled in a questionnaire on practices regarding prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD), cancer, osteoporosis, and overweight/underweight. Half of the GPs were questioned about the issue of prevention based upon female case stories and the other half on male case stories with identical wording. The GPs more often in relation to: Prevention of CHD gave dietary counselling and recommended weight loss to slightly overweight male than female patients. Prevention of cancers gave dietary counselling and recommended weight loss and increase of exercise to female than to male patients. Prevention of osteoporosis recommended a supplement of calcium and vitamin D to female than to male patients. Treatment of underweight recommended weight gain and discussion of psycho-social issues to underweight female than male patients. In conclusion, GPs distinguish between men and women in relation to prevention strategies in general practice. There is a need for well-described prevention and action strategies with relevant gender differentiation for use in general practice.
PubMed ID
9922688 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Dec 21;160(52):7601-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-1998
Author
B L Heitmann
M. Osler
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
H:S Kommunehospitalet, Institut for Sygdomsforebyggelse, Epidemiologisk Grundforsknings center.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Dec 21;160(52):7601-5
Date
Dec-21-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Food Habits
Heart Diseases - etiology
Humans
Life Style
Neoplasms - etiology
Obesity - complications - etiology - prevention & control
Obesity, Morbid - prevention & control
Risk factors
PubMed ID
9889680 View in PubMed
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[The role of diet for development of renal cell carcinoma]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21650
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Apr 27;160(18):2689-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-1998
Author
A. Mellemgaard
J K McLaughlin
O K Overvad
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Sektor for Kraeftepidemiologi, Kraeftens Bekaempelse, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Apr 27;160(18):2689-93
Date
Apr-27-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Abstract
Dietary risk factors for renal cell cancer were investigated in a population based case-control study of incident cases. A total of 351 cases and 340 controls matched for age and sex were interviewed about dietary habits as well as exposure to other known or suspected risk factors. An association was found between risk of renal cell cancer and energy intake, especially fats. There was no protective effect of fruits but a weak protective effect of cruceferous vegetables. The association with diet was present after adjusting for the effect of cigarette smoking, socioeconomic status and body mass index, all of which have been identified as risk factors for renal cell cancer.
PubMed ID
9599551 View in PubMed
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[Salt--an analysis of the connection between intake and health]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15825
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Nov 4;158(45):6415-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-1996
Author
O B Pedersen
H. Ibsen
O K Overvad
L F Ovesen
P. Skøtt
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Nov 4;158(45):6415-20
Date
Nov-4-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
English Abstract
Food Additives - adverse effects - analysis
Health status
Humans
Risk factors
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
The average salt intake (sodium chloride) in Denmark is about 10 g/person/day, which is approximately 8 times higher than the estimated need. Salt added during industrial processing of foods constitutes more than 50% of the daily salt intake. Observational and experimental epidemiological studies indicate no decisive effects on blood pressure in humans caused by considerable variations in the daily salt intake. However, a small group of patients with hypertension may lower their blood pressure by reducing the daily intake of salt to 5 g. It has not been convincingly documented that high salt intake is an independent risk factor in the pathogenesis of asthma, osteoporosis, toxaemia of pregnancy or apoplectic stroke. On the other hand, several epidemiological studies point to the fact that the intake of salted foods may increase the risk of gastric cancer. It is recommended 1) that the food industry as far as possible limits the addition of salt, 2) that foods are supplied with a declaration of the salt content, and 3) that the research in this field is strengthened to facilitate the identification of persons at increased risk of developing disorders associated with high salt intake.
PubMed ID
8992674 View in PubMed
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Dietary risk factors for renal cell carcinoma in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22695
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1996 Apr;32A(4):673-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
A. Mellemgaard
J K McLaughlin
K. Overvad
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1996 Apr;32A(4):673-82
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary Fats
Dietary Proteins
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals
Sex Factors
Vitamins
Abstract
The role of diet in the aetiology of renal cell carcinoma was investigated in a population-based case-control study in Denmark. Cases were 20-79 years old, with a histologically verified diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. Controls were sampled from the general population and were frequency-matched on age and sex. A total of 351 cases (73% of the eligible) and 340 controls (68% of the eligible) were included in the study. Dietary information was obtained in a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and the information was confirmed in a subsequent interview performed by trained interviewers who also elicited information on other suspected risk factors such as smoking, occupation, medical history, education and reproductive history. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratios, and, both frequency of consumption of various food stuffs and computed nutrients were examined. A positive association was observed between risk of renal cell carcinoma and total energy intake (odds ratio, OR, for highest quartile compared to lowest: 1.7 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.0-3.0) for men, and 3.5 (95% CI 1.6-6.5) for women), fat intake (OR for highest quartile compared to lowest: 1.9 (95% CI 1.1-3.5) for men, and 3.3 (95% CI 1.6-6.9) for women). For women, an effect was also seen for intake of carbohydrates (OR for highest quartile compared to lowest: 3.2 (95% CI 1.5-6.8), while no protective effect was seen for vegetables or fruit. Dairy products may be associated with risk of renal cell cancer (OR for women using thickly spread butter compared to thinly spread: 11.4 (95% CI 2.8-45), OR for women who drank more than one glass of milk with 3.5% fat content compared to never drink milk: 3.7 (95% CI 1.2-11). As expected, total energy intake, intake of fat, protein and carbohydrates were closely correlated making it difficult to identify one of the energy sources as more closely associated with risk of renal cell cancer than the other. Several energy sources have been identified as possible risk factors for renal cell carcinoma. It is possible that a high energy intake as such rather than the individual sources are responsible for the increased risk. Furthermore, dairy fats may be associated with renal cell carcinoma risk. The observed associations appeared stronger in women, and did not explain the association with obesity and low socio-economic status previously found in Denmark.
PubMed ID
8695272 View in PubMed
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Waist and hip circumferences and all-cause mortality: usefulness of the waist-to-hip ratio?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67255
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Jun;28(6):741-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
J. Bigaard
K. Frederiksen
A. Tjønneland
B L Thomsen
K. Overvad
B L Heitmann
T I A Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, The Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. janne@cancer.dk
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Jun;28(6):741-7
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Constitution - physiology
Body mass index
Cause of Death
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Smoking - mortality
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether waist and hip circumferences, in addition to body mass index (BMI), are related to all-cause mortality. We studied these associations and tested the usefulness of the waist-to-hip ratio for mortality prediction. DESIGN: A Danish prospective cohort study with data collected between 1993 and 1997. SUBJECTS: A total of 27 179 men and 29 875 women born in Denmark and aged 50-64 years were followed for a median of 6.8 years. MEASUREMENTS: BMI, waist and hip circumferences at baseline. RESULTS: The associations between hip circumference and all-cause mortality were inverse for both men and women, but only after adjustment for waist circumference, or BMI, or both. The mortality rate ratios of mutually adjusted waist and hip circumferences were 0.63 (95% CI: 0.56, 0.71), and 0.70 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.79) times higher per 10% larger hip circumference in men and women, respectively, and 1.45 (95% CI: 1.34, 1.57) and 1.22 (95% CI: 1.14, 1.31) times higher per 10% larger waist circumference. The adequacy of the waist-to-hip ratio as a substitute for separate measurements of waist and hip circumferences depended on which other variables the analysis was adjusted for, indicating that the waist-to-hip ratio should be used with precaution. CONCLUSION: When mutually adjusted, waist and hip circumferences show opposite associations with all-cause mortality, probably due to different effects of adipose tissue in the abdominal and gluteofemoral regions. The waist-to-hip ratio cannot always capture these relations adequately.
PubMed ID
15052280 View in PubMed
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[The effect of transdermal nicotine patches in smoking cessation. A randomized trial in pharmacy customers in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67548
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Feb 1;161(5):593-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1999
Author
J. Sønderskov
J. Olsen
L. Meillier
O K Overvad
S. Sabroe
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Institut for Epidemiologi og Socialmedicin.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Feb 1;161(5):593-7
Date
Feb-1-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Cutaneous
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Drugs, Non-Prescription
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nicotine - administration & dosage
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the effect of 24-hour nicotine patches in smoking cessation among over-the-counter customers in Denmark based on a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Participants were consecutive customers to whom nicotine patches were offered free of charge and as the only treatment. Forty-two pharmacies in the areas of Aarhus and Copenhagen in Denmark participated in the trial, and 522 customers who smoked 10 or more cigarettes per day were randomized to either nicotine or placebo patches from January to March 1994. Twenty-four-hour patches were offered for a three-month period. Those smoking 20 or more cigarettes per day started on 21 mg/day patches. Customers who smoked less started on 14 mg/day patches and all the participants were gradually reduced to 7 mg/day patches during the study period. Smoking behaviour and compliance were recorded by means of self-administered question-naires and telephone interviews. Smoking status was recorded following each four-week treatment period, and 26 weeks after inclusion. There was a significant increase in smoking cessations rates, but only among smokers who started on 21 mg/day patches after eight weeks of follow-up. No significant differences in smoking cessation rates were seen among smokers who started with the low dose nicotine or placebo patches.
PubMed ID
9989194 View in PubMed
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Nicotine patches in smoking cessation: a randomized trial among over-the-counter customers in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67634
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb 15;145(4):309-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1997
Author
J. Sønderskov
J. Olsen
S. Sabroe
L. Meillier
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb 15;145(4):309-18
Date
Feb-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Cutaneous
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Drugs, Non-Prescription - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nicotine - therapeutic use
Nicotinic Agonists - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking Cessation - methods
Treatment Outcome
Treatment Refusal
Abstract
The authors examined the effect of 24-hour nicotine patches in smoking cessation among over-the-counter customers in Denmark, based on a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Participants were consecutive customers to whom nicotine patches were offered as the only treatment. Forty-two pharmacies in the areas of Aarhus and Copenhagen in Denmark participated in the trial, and 522 customers who smoked 10 or more cigarettes per day were randomized to either nicotine patches or placebo from January to March 1994. Customers with chronic diseases and pregnant or breastfeeding women were excluded from the trial. Twenty-four-hour patches were offered free of charge during a 3-month period. Those smoking 20 or more cigarettes per day started on a dose of 21-mg/day patches. Customers who smoked less started on patches of 14 mg/day; and for all of the participants, the dose was gradually reduced to 7-mg/day patches during the study period. Smoking behavior and compliance were recorded by means of self-administered questionnaires and telephone interviews. Smoking status was recorded in intervals of 4 weeks, which was fixed to be a treatment period, and 26 weeks after inclusion. There was a significant increase in smoking cessation rates after 8 weeks of follow-up but only among smokers who started on 21-mg/day patches. There was a marked placebo effect at each time of contact during the trial, especially in those smoking fewer than 20 cigarettes per day. Although the noncompliance rate was high overall due to discontinuation in the use of patches by relapsed smokers, noncompliance among successful quitters was low. More side effects were seen in the nicotine group than in the placebo group, but none of the reported side effects were serious. It appears that regular healthy smokers who were customers of nonprescribed nicotine patches and who received 21-mg/day nicotine patches benefited from the active treatment (44.1% stopped smoking after 4 weeks), but almost as many stopped smoking in the placebo group (37.3% after 4 weeks). No significant differences in smoking cessation rates were seen among smokers who started with the low-dose nicotine or placebo patches.
PubMed ID
9054234 View in PubMed
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Long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and diabetes-associated mortality: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121320
Source
Diabetologia. 2013 Jan;56(1):36-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
M. Sørensen
M. Ketzel
O. Hertel
S. Loft
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
Z J Andersen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Diabetologia. 2013 Jan;56(1):36-46
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - mortality
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide - toxicity
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Residence Characteristics
Time Factors
Urban health
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate whether air pollution from traffic at a residence is associated with mortality related to type 1 or type 2 diabetes.
We followed up 52,061 participants in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort for diabetes-related mortality in the nationwide Register of Causes of Death, from baseline in 1993-1997 up to the end of 2009, and traced their residential addresses since 1971 in the Central Population Registry. We used dispersion-modelled concentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) since 1971 and amount of traffic at the baseline residence as indicators of traffic-related air pollution and used Cox regression models to estimate mortality-rate ratios (MRRs) with adjustment for potential confounders.
Mean levels of NO2 at the residence since 1971 were significantly associated with mortality from diabetes. Exposure above 19.4 µg/m³ (upper quartile) was associated with a MRR of 2.15 (95% CI 1.21, 3.83) when compared with below 13.6 µg/m³ (lower quartile), corresponding to an MRR of 1.31 (95% CI 0.98, 1.76) per 10 µg/m³ NO2 after adjustment for potential confounders.
This study suggests that traffic-related air pollution is associated with mortality from diabetes. If confirmed, reduction in population exposure to traffic-related air pollution could be an additional strategy against the global public health burden of diabetes.
PubMed ID
22918192 View in PubMed
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Body composition and body fat distribution in relation to later risk of acute myocardial infarction: a Danish follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137399
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1433-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
J G Stegger
E B Schmidt
T. Obel
T L Berentzen
A. Tjønneland
T I A Sørensen
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. Jakob.Stegger@rn.dk
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1433-41
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Composition
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Obesity is a modifiable risk factor for acute myocardial infarction (MI), but lean body mass (LBM) may also be an important factor. Low LBM may increase the risk of MI and LBM may modify the effect of obesity on MI. Thus, the inability of the classical anthropometric measures to evaluate LBM may lead to misclassification of MI risk in both lean and obese persons. We investigated the associations between incident MI and bioelectrical impedance analyses (BIA) derived measures of body composition in combination with body mass index (BMI) and anthropometric measures of body fat distribution.
From 1993 to 1997, 27?148 men and 29?863 women, aged 50 to 64 year, were recruited into the Danish prospective study Diet, Cancer and Health. During 11.9 years of follow-up we identified 2028 cases of incident MI (1487 men and 541 women). BMI, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference and BIA of body composition including body fat mass (BFM), body fat percentage and LBM were measured at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazard models with age as time axis and performed extensive control for confounding. Weight, BMI, classical estimates of abdominal obesity and BIA estimates of obesity showed significant positive associations with incident MI. However, BFM adjusted for WC showed no association. Low LBM was associated with a higher risk of incident MI in both genders, and high LBM was associated with a higher risk in men.
Obesity was positively associated with MI. Estimates of obesity achieved by BIA seemed not to add additional information to classical anthropometric measures regarding MI risk. Both high and low LBM may be positively associated with MI.
PubMed ID
21285940 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.