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Aiming toWards Evidence baSed inTerpretation of Cardiac biOmarkers in patients pResenting with chest pain-the WESTCOR study: study design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310408
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2019 Oct; 53(5):280-285
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2019
Author
Hilde L Tjora
Ole-Thomas Steiro
Jørund Langørgen
Rune Bjørneklett
Ottar K Nygård
Renate Renstrøm
Øyvind Skadberg
Vernon V S Bonarjee
Bertil Lindahl
Paul Collinson
Torbjørn Omland
Kjell Vikenes
Kristin M Aakre
Author Affiliation
Emergency Care Clinic, Haukeland University Hospital , Bergen , Norway.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2019 Oct; 53(5):280-285
Date
Oct-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - blood - diagnosis - mortality
Algorithms
Angina, Unstable - blood - diagnosis - mortality
Biomarkers - blood
Computed Tomography Angiography
Coronary Angiography - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction - blood - diagnosis - mortality
Norway
Observational Studies as Topic
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Troponin - blood
Abstract
Objectives. The main aim of the Aiming toWards Evidence baSed inTerpretation of Cardiac biOmarkers in patients pResenting with chest pain (WESTCOR-study) (Clinical Trials number NCT02620202) is to improve diagnostic pathways for patients presenting to the Emergency department (ED) with acute chest pain. Design. The WESTCOR-study is a two center, cross-sectional and prospective observational study recruiting unselected patients presenting to the ED with suspected non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). Patient inclusion started September 2015 and we plan to include 2250 patients, finishing in 2019. The final diagnosis will be adjudicated by two independent cardiologists based on all available information including serial high sensitivity cardiac troponin measurements, coronary angiography, coronary CT angiography and echocardiography. The study includes one derivation cohort (N?=?985) that will be used to develop rule out/rule in algorithms for NSTEMI and NSTE-ACS (if possible) using novel troponin assays, and to validate established NSTEMI algorithms, with and without clinical scoring systems. The study further includes one subcohort (n?=?500) where all patients are examined with coronary CT angiography independent of biomarker status, aiming to assess the associations between biomarkers and the extent and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Finally, an external validation cohort (N?=?750) will be included at Stavanger University Hospital. Prospective studies will be based on the merged cohorts. Conclusion. The WESTCOR study will provide new diagnostic algorithms for early inclusion and exclusion of NSTE-ACS and insights in the associations between cardiovascular biomarkers, CT-angiographic findings and short and long-term clinical outcomes.
PubMed ID
31216908 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infections in Denmark, Norway and Sweden, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151890
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009 Mar 12;14(10)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-12-2009
Author
T. Bruun
G. Sørensen
L P Forshell
T. Jensen
K. Nygard
G. Kapperud
B A Lindstedt
T. Berglund
A. Wingstrand
R F Petersen
L. Müller
C. Kjelsø
S. Ivarsson
M. Hjertqvist
S. Löfdahl
S. Ethelberg
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Tone.Bruun@fhi.no
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009 Mar 12;14(10)
Date
Mar-12-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Meat - microbiology
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - microbiology
Salmonella typhimurium - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In November-December 2008, Norway and Denmark independently identified outbreaks of Salmonella Typhimurium infections characterised in the multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) by a distinct profile. Outbreak investigations were initiated independently in the two countries. In Denmark, a total of 37 cases were identified, and multiple findings of the outbreak strain in pork and pigs within the same supply chain led to the identification of pork in various forms as the source. In Norway, ten cases were identified, and the outbreak investigation quickly indicated meat bought in Sweden as the probable source and the Swedish authorities were alerted. Investigations in Sweden identified four human cases and two isolates from minced meat with the distinct profile. Subsequent trace-back of the meat showed that it most likely originated from Denmark. Through international alert from Norway on 19 December, it became clear that the Danish and Norwegian outbreak strains were identical and, later on, that the source of the outbreaks in all three countries could be traced back to Danish pork. MLVA was instrumental in linking the outbreaks in the different countries and tracing the source. This outbreak illustrates that good international communication channels, early alerting mechanisms, inter-sectoral collaboration between public health and food safety authorities and harmonised molecular typing tools are important for effective identification and management of cross-border outbreaks. Differences in legal requirements for food safety in neighbouring countries may be a challenge in terms of communication with consumers in areas where cross-border shopping is common.
PubMed ID
19317986 View in PubMed
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The antihypertensive MTHFR gene polymorphism rs17367504-G is a possible novel protective locus for preeclampsia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286147
Source
J Hypertens. 2017 Jan;35(1):132-139
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Liv Cecilie V Thomsen
Nina S McCarthy
Phillip E Melton
Gemma Cadby
Rigmor Austgulen
Ottar K Nygård
Matthew P Johnson
Shaun Brennecke
Eric K Moses
Line Bjørge
Ann-Charlotte Iversen
Source
J Hypertens. 2017 Jan;35(1):132-139
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alleles
Australia
Case-Control Studies
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Pleiotropy
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Hypertension - genetics
Inflammation - genetics
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2) - genetics
Norway
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Pre-Eclampsia - genetics
Pregnancy
Protective factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Preeclampsia is a complex heterogeneous disease commonly defined by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria in pregnancy. Women experiencing preeclampsia have increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) later in life. Preeclampsia and CVD share risk factors and pathophysiologic mechanisms, including dysregulated inflammation and raised blood pressure. Despite commonalities, little is known about the contribution of shared genes (pleiotropy) to these diseases. This study aimed to investigate whether genetic risk factors for hypertension or inflammation are pleiotropic by also being associated with preeclampsia.
We genotyped 122 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in women with preeclampsia (n?=?1006) and nonpreeclamptic controls (n?=?816) from the Norwegian HUNT Study. SNPs were chosen on the basis of previously reported associations with either nongestational hypertension or inflammation in genome-wide association studies. The SNPs were tested for association with preeclampsia in a multiple logistic regression model.
The minor (G) allele of the intronic SNP rs17367504 in the gene methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) was associated with a protective effect on preeclampsia (odds ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.53-0.80) in the Norwegian cohort. This association did not replicate in an Australian preeclampsia case-control cohort (P?=?0.68, odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.83-1.32, minor allele frequency?=?0.15).
MTHFR is important for regulating transmethylation processes and is involved in regulation of folate metabolism. The G allele of rs17367504 has previously been shown to protect against nongestational hypertension. Our study suggests a novel association between this allele and reduced risk for preeclampsia. This is the first study associating the minor (G) allele of a SNP within the MTHFR gene with a protective effect on preeclampsia, and in doing so identifying a possible pleiotropic protective effect on preeclampsia and hypertension.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27755385 View in PubMed
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Association between environmental risk factors and campylobacter infections in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180788
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2004 Apr;132(2):317-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
K. Nygård
Y. Andersson
J A Røttingen
A. Svensson
J. Lindbäck
T. Kistemann
J. Giesecke
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2004 Apr;132(2):317-25
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Poisson Distribution
Risk factors
Ruminants - microbiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Water Microbiology
Water supply
Abstract
Campylobacter sp. is the most common cause of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in Sweden and the incidence has been increasing. Case-control studies to identify risk factors have been conducted in several countries, but much remains unexplained. The geographical distribution of campylobacter infections varies substantially, and many environmental factors may influence the observed pattern. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) offer an opportunity to use routinely available surveillance data to explore associations between potential environmental risk factors showing a geographical pattern and disease incidence, complementing traditional approaches for investigating risk factors for disease. We investigated associations between campylobacter incidence and environmental factors related to water and livestock in Sweden. Poisson regression was used to estimate the strength of the associations. Positive associations were found between campylobacter incidence and average water-pipe length per person, ruminant density, and a negative association with the percentage of the population receiving water from a public water supply. This indicates that drinking water and contamination from livestock may be important factors in explaining sporadic human campylobacteriosis in Sweden, and that contamination occurring in the water distribution system might be more important than previously considered.
PubMed ID
15061507 View in PubMed
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Association between Weight Change and Mortality in Community Living Older People Followed for Up to 14 Years. The Hordaland Health Study (HUSK).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289903
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2017; 21(8):909-917
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
T R Haugsgjerd
J Dierkes
S E Vollset
K J Vinknes
O K Nygård
R Seifert
G Sulo
G S Tell
Author Affiliation
Teresa Risan Haugsgjerd, Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Kalfarveien 31, 5018 Bergen, Norway; Email: Teresa.Haugsgjerd@uib.no, Tel: +47 40634711.
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2017; 21(8):909-917
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Body Weight - physiology
Cohort Studies
Community Medicine
Female
Humans
Male
Mortality
Norway
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
To study the importance of weight change with regard to mortality in older people.
Prospective cohort study.
The cohort includes participants in the Hordaland Health Study, Norway, 1997-99 (N=2935, age 71-74 years) who had previously participated in a survey in 1992-93.
Participants with weight measured at both surveys were followed for mortality through 2012. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate risk of death according to changes in weight. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for people with stable weight (± 3 kg were significantly associated with increased risk of mortality. Thus, weight should be routinely measured in older adults.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28972244 View in PubMed
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B vitamin treatments modify the risk of myocardial infarction associated with a MTHFD1 polymorphism in patients with stable angina pectoris.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284813
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Jun;26(6):495-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Y P Ding
E K R Pedersen
S. Johansson
J F Gregory
P M Ueland
G F T Svingen
Ø. Helgeland
K. Meyer
Å. Fredriksen
O K Nygård
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Jun;26(6):495-501
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angina, Stable - diagnosis - drug therapy - enzymology - genetics
Female
Folic Acid - therapeutic use
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase (NADP) - genetics
Middle Aged
Minor Histocompatibility Antigens - genetics
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - enzymology - genetics - prevention & control
Norway
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Vitamin B 6 - therapeutic use
Vitamin B Complex - therapeutic use
Abstract
Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD1) catalyzes three sequential reactions that metabolize derivatives of tetrahydrofolate (THF) in folate-dependent one-carbon metabolism. Impaired MTHFD1 flux has been linked to disturbed lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. However, limited information is available on its relation to the development of atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease.
We explored the association between a MTHFD1 polymorphism (rs1076991 C?>?T) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and potential effect modifications by folic acid/B12 and/or vitamin B6 treatment in suspected stable angina pectoris patients (n?=?2381) participating in the randomized Western Norway B Vitamin Intervention Trial (WENBIT). During the median follow-up of 4.9 years 204 participants (8.6%) suffered an AMI. After adjusting for established CVD risk factors, the MTHFD1 polymorphism was significantly associated with AMI (HR: 1.49; 95% CI, 1.23-1.81). A similar association was observed among patients allocated to treatment with vitamin B6 alone (HR: 1.53; 95% CI, 1.01-2.31), and an even stronger relationship was seen in patients treated with both vitamin B6 and folic acid/B12 (HR: 2.35; 95% CI, 1.55-3.57). However, no risk association between the MTHFD1 polymorphism and AMI was seen in patients treated with placebo (HR: 1.29; 95% CI, 0.86-1.93) or folic acid/B12 (1.17; 95% CI, 0.83-1.65).
A common and functional MTHFD1 polymorphism is associated with increased risk of AMI, although the risk seems to be dependent on specific B vitamin treatment. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the possible mechanisms, also in order to explore potential effect modifications by nutritional factors.
PubMed ID
26803590 View in PubMed
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[Careful monitoring of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. No cases of the new variant of CJD discovered in Sweden so far].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192489
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 24;98(43):4697-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-2001
Author
K. Nygård
M. Arneborn
J. Giesecke
Author Affiliation
Epidemiologiska avdelningen, Smittskyddsinstitutet, Stockholm. karin.nygård@smi.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 24;98(43):4697-9
Date
Oct-24-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Syndrome - diagnosis - transmission
Disease Notification
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
11715245 View in PubMed
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[Cholesterol determination at conscription. A method to identify persons with high risk of developing cardiovascular disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54728
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Oct 30;115(26):3249-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1995
Author
O K Nygård
G. von der Lippe
S. Seim
Author Affiliation
Hjerteavdelingen, Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Oct 30;115(26):3249-53
Date
Oct-30-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - etiology - genetics
Cholesterol - blood
English Abstract
Humans
Life Style
Male
Military Personnel
Norway
Risk factors
Abstract
In the adult population, serum cholesterol level and risk of cardiovascular disease are related to some extent to habits and lifestyle established at an early age. We have estimated serum total cholesterol levels by means of a dry chemical method and have collected information on established cardiovascular risk factors among 1,203 young Norwegian men at conscription. 30 of the recruits with the highest serum cholesterol levels were later examined in the hospital's out-patient clinic. A total of 30.8% of the recruits were daily smokers. Mean serum total cholesterol was 4.05 mmol/l with a 97.5 percentile value of 6.31 mmol/l. The prevalence of coronary heart disease among parents was significantly higher among recruits from the upper cholesterol quintile (4.2%) compared with those in the lowest quintile (0.8%) (p = 0.02). These findings show that cholesterol screening at conscription is feasible and can be used to identify a group of men at high risk of subsequently developing cardiovascular disease.
PubMed ID
7482452 View in PubMed
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Dietary choline is related to increased risk of acute myocardial infarction in patients with stable angina pectoris.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308244
Source
Biochimie. 2020 Jun; 173:68-75
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2020
Author
Anthea Van Parys
Vegard Lysne
Gard Frodahl Tveitevåg Svingen
Per Magne Ueland
Indu Dhar
Jannike Øyen
Jutta Dierkes
Ottar K Nygård
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nutrition, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: anthea.parys@uib.no.
Source
Biochimie. 2020 Jun; 173:68-75
Date
Jun-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Angina, Stable - blood - epidemiology
Choline - blood
Diet
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
High plasma choline has been associated with the metabolic syndrome and risk of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease. However, dietary choline is not correlated with choline plasma concentrations, and there are few studies and contradictory evidence regarding dietary choline and cardiovascular events. In addition, a recommended dietary allowance for choline has not been established and remains a point of contention. This study assessed the association between dietary choline, including choline forms, and risk of incident acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with suspected stable angina pectoris (SAP). In total 1981 patients (80% men, median age 62) from the Western Norway B Vitamin Intervention Trial were included in this analysis. Information on dietary choline was obtained using a 169-item food frequency questionnaire. The Cardiovascular Disease in Norway project provided data on AMI. Risk associations were estimated using Cox-regression analysis using energy-adjusted choline intake. Median (25th, 75th percentile) total energy-adjusted choline intake was 288 (255, 326) mg/d. During a median (25th, 75th percentile) follow-up of 7.5 (6.3, 8.8) years, 312 (15.7%) patients experienced at least one AMI. Increased intakes of energy-adjusted choline (HR [95% CI] per 50?mg increase 1.11 [1.03, 1.20]), phosphatidylcholine (HR per 50?mg increase 1.24 [1.08, 1.42]) and sphingomyelin (HR per 5?mg increase 1.16 [1.02, 1.31]) were associated with higher AMI risk. In conclusion, higher dietary intakes of total choline, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin were associated with increased risk of AMI in patients with SAP. Future studies are necessary to explore underlying mechanisms for this observation.
PubMed ID
31707100 View in PubMed
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[Don't leave practical studies to the nurses. Interview by Kjell Arne Bakke].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220882
Source
J Sykepleien. 1993 Jun 8;81(10):14-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-8-1993

32 records – page 1 of 4.